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  1. Robert P. Vertes (2005). Sleep is for Rest, Waking Consciousness is for Learning and Memory – of Any Kind. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (1):86-87.
    Although considerable attention has been paid to the possible involvement of sleep in memory processing, there is no substantial evidence for it. Walker describes a phenomenon of consolidation-based enhancement (CBE), whereby performance on select procedural tasks improves with overnight sleep; that is, without additional practice on the tasks. CBE, however, appears restricted to a few tasks, and even with these tasks CBE is not confined to sleep but also occurs during wakefulness. Sleep serves no unique role in this process. At (...)
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  2. Robert P. Vertes & Kathleen E. Eastman13 (2003). REM Sleep is Not Committed to Memory. In Edward F. Pace-Schott, Mark Solms, Mark Blagrove & Stevan Harnad (eds.), Sleep and Dreaming: Scientific Advances and Reconsiderations. Cambridge University Press. 269.
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  3. Robert P. Vertes & Kathleen E. Eastman (2000). Rem Sleep is Not Committed to Memory. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):1057-1063.
    We believe that this has been a constructive debate on the topic of memory consolidation and REM sleep. It was a lively and spirited exchange – the essence of science. A number of issues were discussed including: the pedestal technique, stress, and early REMD work in animals; REM windows; the processing of declarative versus procedural memory in REM in humans; a mnemonic function for theta rhythm in waking but not in REM sleep; the lack of cognitive deficits in patients on (...)
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  4. Robert P. Vertes & Kathleen E. Eastman (2000). The Case Against Memory Consolidation in Rem Sleep. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):867-876.
    We present evidence disputing the hypothesis that memories are processed or consolidated in REM sleep. A review of REM deprivation (REMD) studies in animals shows these reports to be about equally divided in showing that REMD does, or does not, disrupt learning/memory. The studies supporting a relationship between REM sleep and memory have been strongly criticized for the confounding effects of very stressful REM deprivation techniques. The three major classes of antidepressant drugs, monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs), and (...)
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  5. Robert P. Vertes (1986). A New Role for FTG Neurons? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (3):425.
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  6. Robert P. Vertes (1981). An Atropine-Sensitive and a Less Atropine-Sensitive System. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (3):493.
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