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  1. Robert Pierson & Richard Reiner (2008). Explanatory Warrant for Scientific Realism. Synthese 161 (2):271 - 282.
    Nancy Cartwright relies upon an inference pattern known as inference to the best causal explanation (IBCE) to support a limited form of entity realism, according to which we are warranted in believing in entities that purportively cause observable effects. IBCE, as usually understood, is valid, even though all other forms of inference to the best explanation (IBE) are usually understood to be invalid. We argue that IBCE and IBE are in the same boat with respect to their ability to support (...)
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  2. Robert Pierson (2003). Alston's Concept of Justification. Teorema 22 (3):49-58.
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  3. Robert Pierson (2000). Christian Mystical Perception and the Theory of Doxastic Practices. Sophia 39 (1):25-45.
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  4. Robert Pierson (1997). Anything Goes. International Studies in Philosophy 29 (2):47-56.
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  5. Robert Pierson (1996). Greek Scepticism: Anti-Realist Trends in Ancient Thought Leo Groarke Montreal and Kingston: McGill-Queen's University Press, 1990, Xiii + 176 Pp. [REVIEW] Dialogue 35 (01):183-.
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  6. Richard Reiner & Robert Pierson (1995). Hacking's Experimental Realism: An Untenable Middle Ground. Philosophy of Science 62 (1):60-69.
    As Laudan and Fine show, and Boyd concedes, the attempt to infer the truth of scientific realism from the fact that it putatively provides the best explanation of the instrumental success of science is circular, since what is to be shown is precisely the legitimacy of such abductive inferences. Hacking's "experimental argument for scientific realism about entities" is one of the few arguments for scientific realism that purports to avoid this circularity. We argue that Hacking's argument is as dependent on (...)
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  7. Robert Pierson (1994). Jonathan Dancy and Ernest Sosa, Eds., A Companion to Epistemology Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 14 (2):87-89.
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  8. Robert Pierson (1994). Thomas Brante, Steve Fuller, and William Lynch, Eds., Controversial Science: From Content to Contention Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 14 (4):238-241.
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  9. Robert Pierson (1994). The Epistemic Authority of Expertise. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1994:398 - 405.
    When is it more rational to think for oneself or to defer to the relevant expert? Expertise is either closed-system oriented and lay-person oriented. The first sort is concerned primarily with controlling and manipulating a discipline's defining set of variables as a closed or relatively closed system. The second sort is simply in the business of "advising" clients. I argue that when expert claims are of the first sort, the layperson must defer to the experts; but when experts either extrapolate (...)
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