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Robert Rynasiewicz [25]Robert A. Rynasiewicz [3]
  1. Robert Rynasiewicz (2014). Adrian Bardon .A Brief History of the Philosophy of Time. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013. Pp. 200. $74.00 (Cloth); $19.95 (Paper). [REVIEW] Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 4 (1):165-168.
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  2. Robert Rynasiewicz (2012). Of Modern Physics. Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 43:90-94.
     
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  3. Robert Rynasiewicz (2012). Simultaneity, Convention, and Gauge Freedom. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 43 (2):90-94.
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  4. Robert Rynasiewicz, Shane Steinert-Threlkeld & Vivek Suri, Mathematical Existence de-Platonized: Introducing Objects of Supposition in the Arts and Sciences.
    In this paper, we introduce a suppositional view of linguistic practice that ranges over fiction, science, and mathematics. While having similar con- sequences to some other views, in particular Linsky and Zalta’s plenitudinous platonism, the view advocated here both differs fundamentally in approach and accounts for a wider range of phenomena and scientific discourse.
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  5. Robert Rynasiewicz, Newton's Views on Space, Time, and Motion. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Isaac Newton founded classical mechanics on the view that space is something distinct from body and that time is something that passes uniformly without regard to whatever happens in the world. For this reason he spoke of absolute space and absolute time, so as to distinguish these entities from the various ways by which we measure them (which he called relative spaces and relative times). From antiquity into the eighteenth century, contrary views which denied that space and time are real (...)
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  6. Robert Rynasiewicz & Jürgen Renn (2006). The Turning Point for Einstein's Annus Mirabilis☆. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 37 (1):5-35.
    The year 1905 has been called Einstein's annus mirabilis in virtue of three ground-breaking works completed over the span of a few months --- the light quantum paper (Einstein, 1905a), the Brownian motion paper (Einstein, 1905c), and the paper on the electrodynamics of moving bodies introducing the special theory of relativity (Einstein, 1905d). There are prima facie reasons for thinking that the origins of these papers cannot be understood in isolation from one another. Due to space limitations, we concentrate primarily (...)
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  7. Robert Rynasiewicz (2003). Field Unification in the Maxwell‐Lorentz Theory with Absolute Space. Philosophy of Science 70 (5):1063-1072.
    Although Trautman (1966) appears to give a unified‐field treatment of electrodynamics in Newtonian spacetime, there are difficulties in cogently interpreting it as such in relation to the facts of electromagnetic and magneto‐electric induction. Presented here is a covariant, nonunified field treatment of the Maxwell‐Lorentz theory with absolute space. This dispels a worry in Earman (1989) as to whether there are any historically realistic examples in which absolute space plays an indispensable role. It also shows how Trautman's formulation can be rendered (...)
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  8. Robert Rynasiewicz (2003). Field Unification in the Maxwell-Lorentz Theory with Absolute Space. Philosophy of Science 70 (5):1063-1072.
    Although Trautman (1966) appears to give a unified-field treatment of electrodynamics in Newtonian spacetime, there are difficulties in cogently interpreting it as such in relation to the facts of electromagnetic and magneto-electric induction. Presented here is a covariant, non-unified field treatment of the Maxwell-Lorentz theory with absolute space. This dispels a worry in Earman (1989) as to whether there are any historically realistic examples in which absolute space plays an indispenable role. It also shows how Trautman`s formulation can be rendered (...)
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  9. Robert Rynasiewicz (2001). Definition, Convention, and Simultaneity: Malament's Result and its Alleged Refutation by Sarkar and Stachel. Proceedings of the Philosophy of Science Association 2001 (3):S345-.
    The question whether distant simultaneity (relativized to an inertial frame) has a factual or a conventional status in special relativity has long been disputed and remains in contention even today. At one point it appeared that Malament (1977) had settled the issue by proving that the only non-trivial equivalence relation definable from (temporally symmetric) causal connectability is the standard simultaneity relation. Recently, though, Sarkar and Stachel (1999) claim to have identified a suspect assumption in the proof by defining a non-standard (...)
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  10. Robert Rynasiewicz, Is Simultaneity Conventional Despite Malament's Result?
    Many take Malaments result that the standard Einstein simultaniety relation is uniquely definable from the causal structure of Minkowski space-time to be tantamount to a refutation of the claim that criterion for simultaneity in the special theory of relativity (STR) is a matter of convention. I call into question this inference by examining concrete alternatives and suggest that what has been overlooked is why it should be assumed that in STR simultaneity must be relative only to a frame of reference (...)
     
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  11. Robert Rynasiewicz, Reichenbach's Epsilon Definition of Simultaneity in Historical and Philosophical Perspective.
    I examine the development of Reichenbach's ideas concerning the conventionality of simultaneity in connection with his ``epsilon''-definition of simultaneity. It does not appear that he ever considered non-standard choices of ``epsilon'' that yield the same ``light-geometry'' as that of special relativity. Rather, it appears he believed that non-standard choices, though always epistemically justified, lead to different ``light-geometries'' (e.g., classical space-time) and thus would necessitate more complicated ``matter axioms'' than those postulated in his axiomatization of relativity.
     
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  12. Robert Rynasiewicz (2000). On the Distinction Between Absolute and Relative Motion. Philosophy of Science 67 (1):70-93.
    One of the issues dividing "absolutists" and "relationists" is the question whether all motion is relative motion or, in the words of Earman, spacetime has "structures that support absolute quantities of motion." This paper argues that, despite the enormous literature bearing on the topic, it is problematic to formulate a general criterion for when a quantity counts as absolute in contrast to merely relative in a way that is not hopelessly parasitic on other, presumably distinct, senses of "absolute." Furthermore, I (...)
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  13. Robert Rynasiewicz (1996). Absolute Versus Relational Space-Time: An Outmoded Debate? Journal of Philosophy 93 (6):279-306.
  14. Robert Rynasiewicz (1996). Is There a Syntactic Solution to the Hole Problem? Philosophy of Science 63 (3):62.
    After some background setting in which it is shown how Maudlin's (1989, 1990) response to the hole argument of Earman and Norton (1987) is related to that of Rynasiewicz (1994), it is argued that the syntactic proposals of Mundy (1992) and of Leeds (1995), which claim to dismiss the hole argument as an uninteresting blunder, are inadequate. This leads to a discussion of how the responses of Maudlin and Rynasiewicz relate to issues about gauge freedom and relativity principles.
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  15. Robert Rynasiewicz (1995). Book Review:Physics and Chance: Philosophical Issues in the Foundations of Statistical Mechanics Lawrence Sklar. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 62 (2):337-.
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  16. Robert Rynasiewicz (1995). Absolute Vs. Relational Theories of Space and Time. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 55 (3):675-687.
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  17. Robert A. Rynasiewicz (1995). Absolute Vs. Relational Theories of Space and Time: A Review of John Earman's ``World Enough and Space-Time''. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 55 (3):675--87.
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  18. Robert A. Rynasiewicz (1995). By Their Properties, Causes, and Effects: Newton's Scholium on Time, Space, Place, and Motion II: The Context. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science 26 (2):295--321.
  19. Robert Rynasiewicz (1994). The Lessons of the Hole Argument. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 45 (2):407-436.
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  20. Robert Rynasiewicz (1992). Rings, Holes and Substantivalism: On the Program of Leibniz Algebras. Philosophy of Science 59 (4):572-589.
    In a number of publications, John Earman has advocated a tertium quid to the usual dichotomy between substantivalism and relationism concerning the nature of spacetime. The idea is that the structure common to the members of an equivalence class of substantival models is captured by a Leibniz algebra which can then be taken to directly characterize the intrinsic reality only indirectly represented by the substantival models. An alleged virtue of this is that, while a substantival interpretation of spacetime theories falls (...)
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  21. Robert Rynasiewicz (1992). Why the New Theory of Reference Does Not Entail Absolute Time and Space. Philosophy of Science 59 (3):508-509.
    I explain why the New Theory of Reference of Marcus, Kripke, Kaplan, Putnam and others does not entail absolute time and space, contrary to what Quentin Smith has recently claimed.
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  22. Robert Rynasiewicz (1988). Lorentz's Local Time and the Theorem of Corresponding States. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1988:67 - 74.
    I address a number of questions concerning the interpretation of local time and the corresponding states theorem (CST) of the Versuch, questions which have been addressed either incompletely or inadequately in the secondary literature. In particular: (1) What is the relation between local time and the behavior of moving clocks? (2) What is the relation between the primed field variables and the electric and magnetic fields in a moving system? (3) What is the relation of the CST to the principle (...)
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  23. Robert Rynasiewicz (1986). The Universality of Laws in Space and Time. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1986:66 - 75.
    A number of writers have suggested that laws of nature must be universal in space and time. Just what this claim amounts to is the focus of the present study. I consider and compare a number of interpretations of the requirement, with especial reference to an example by Tooley which seems paradigmatic of the antithesis of universality in space and time. I also sketch a number of other concepts of "local", "global", and "universal", each of which should be (...)
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  24. Robert Rynasiewicz (1984). Observability. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1984:189 - 201.
    It is customarily thought that in addition to the class of observed phenomena there is a larger class of observable phenomena. For a theory to be empirically adequate, it must be true on this larger class. It is denied that there is such a thing as the class observable over and above observed phenomena. This does not entail that empirical adequacy reduces to agreement with just the observed facts. Observability is a feature of abstract items in the models of theories, (...)
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  25. Robert Rynasiewicz (1983). Review. [REVIEW] Synthese 56 (1).
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  26. Robert A. Rynasiewicz (1983). Falsifiability and the Semantic Eliminability of Theoretical Languages. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 34 (3):225-241.
  27. John Earman, Clark Glymour & Robert Rynasiewicz (1982). On Writing the History of Special Relativity. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1982:403 - 416.
    Nearly all accounts of the genesis of special relativity unhesitatingly assume that the theory was worked out in a roughly five week period following the discovery of the relativity of simultaneity. Not only is there no direct evidence for this common presupposition, there are numerous considerations which militate against it. The evidence suggests it is far more reasonable that Einstein was already in possession of the Lorentz and field transformations, that he had applied these to the dynamics of the electron, (...)
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  28. John Earman, Clark Glymour & Robert Rynasiewicz, On Writing the History of Relativity.
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