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Profile: Robert Gall (Bethany College, West Virginia)
  1. Robert S. Gall (2013). Faith in Doubt in the End. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 73 (1):29-38.
    At one time or another, most Contemporary Continental philosophers of religion make reference to Nietzsche’s announcement that “God is dead.” However, their interpretation and treatment of that announcement owes nothing to Nietzsche. Instead, they see the death of God as Hegel did, as a moment in a transition to a new way of talking and thinking about God or the Absolute. Their faith in God or the Absolute is not in doubt in the end. We argue that if one hears (...)
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  2. Robert S. Gall (2013). Fideism or Faith in Doubt? Philosophy Today 57 (4):358-368.
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  3. Robert S. Gall (2009). From Daimonion to The “Last” God. Philosophy Today 53 (3):265-272.
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  4. Robert S. Gall (2007). An Environment Friendly God: Response to Nancy Hudson's “Divine Immanence”. [REVIEW] Philosophia 35 (3-4):357-360.
    This paper is a response to Professor Nancy Hudson’s paper “Divine Immanence: Nicholas of Cusa’s Understanding of Theophany and the Retrieval of a ‘New’ Model of God,” (Nancy Hudson, “Divine Immanence: Nicholas of Cusa’s Understanding of Theophany and the Retrieval of a ‘New’ Model of God,” Journal of Theological Studies 56.2 (October 2005): 450–470). The global ecological crisis has spawned intensive reflection about living in right relationship with the earth. Western Christian thought has received special scrutiny since modern alienation from (...)
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  5. Robert S. Gall (2003). Interrupting Speculation: The Thinking of Heidegger and Greek Tragedy. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 36 (2):177-194.
    Despite his extended readings of parts of the Antigone of Sophocles, Heidegger nowhere explicitly sets about giving us a theory of tragedy or a detailed analysis of the essence of tragedy. The following paper seeks to piece together Heidegger's understanding of tragedy and tragic experience by looking to themes in his thinking – particularly his analyses of early Greek thinking – and connecting them both to his scattered references to tragedy and actual examples from Greek tragedy. What we find is (...)
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  6. Robert S. Gall (2001). Different Religions, Diverse Gods. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 49 (1):33-47.
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  7. Robert S. Gall (1999). Kami and Daimōn: A Cross-Cultural Reflection on What is Divine. Philosophy East and West 49 (1):63-74.
    The purpose here is to recall the diversity of our experience, particularly the archaic experience, of what is divine, through Motoori Norinaga and Martin Heidegger and their considerations of the archaic notions of kami and daimōn. Using their insights and other sources also becomes a means for reconfiguring our understanding of philosophy of religion as a thinking that enacts what it is about, drawing no hard and fast distinctions between thinking and practice, in the hope of seeing religion as it (...)
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  8. Robert S. Gall (1998). Danger: Philosophy of Religion. Philosophy Today 42 (4):393-401.
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  9. Robert S. Gall (1994). Living on (Happily) Ever After. Philosophy Today 38 (2):167-180.
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  10. Robert S. Gall (1994). Living on (Happily) Ever After: Derrida, Philosophy and the Comic. Philosophy Today 38 (2):167-180.
     
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  11. Robert S. Gall (1989). Heidegger, Tragedy, and Ethical Reflection. International Studies in Philosophy 21 (1):33-48.
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  12. Robert S. Gall (1988). Tragedy or Religion? A Question of "Radical Hermeneutics". Philosophy Today 32 (3):244-255.
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  13. Robert S. Gall (1987). Beyond Theism and Atheism: Heidegger's Significance for Religious Thinking. Distributors for the U.S. And Canada, Kluwer Academic Publishers.
  14. Robert S. Gall (1986). Mysticism and Ontology: A Heideggerian Critique of Caputo. Southern Journal of Philosophy 24 (4):463-478.
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  15. Robert S. Gall (1986). The Inside and the Outside: Religious Experience and Religious Thought. Auslegung 12:122-133.
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  16. Robert S. Gall (1985). Beyond Tragedy. Philosophy Today 29 (2):110-120.
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  17. Robert S. Gall (1985). Beyond Theodicy: The Divine in Heidegger and Tragedy. Philosophy Today 29 (2):110-120.
    The paper attempts to account for the contradictory nature of divinity in tragedy by referring to heidegger's thinking and using tragic literature to illustrate heidegger's discussions of the divine. Heidegger and tragedy are found to have a unique understanding of the divine that forsakes theodicies and emphasizes the questionableness of divinity as essential to the experience of the divine.
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