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Robert Stern [63]Robert M. Stern [2]
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Profile: Robert Stern (University of Sheffield)
  1. Alix Cohen & Robert Stern (eds.) (forthcoming). Thinking About The Emotions: A Philosophical History. Oxford.
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  2. Robert Stern (forthcoming). Hegel and the New Historicism. Bulletin of the Hegel Society of Great Britain.
     
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  3. Robert Stern (2014). Darwall on Second‐Personal Ethics. European Journal of Philosophy 22 (2):321-333.
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  4. Robert Stern (2013). An Hegelian in Strange Costume? On Peirce's Relation to Hegel I. Philosophy Compass 8 (1):53-62.
  5. Robert Stern (2013). An Hegelian in Strange Costume? On Peirce's Relation to Hegel II. Philosophy Compass 8 (1):63-72.
  6. Robert Stern (2013). Hegel's Critique of Kant: From Dichotomy to Identity. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 21 (4):807-810.
    (2013). Hegel's Critique of Kant: From Dichotomy to Identity. British Journal for the History of Philosophy: Vol. 21, No. 4, pp. 807-810. doi: 10.1080/09608788.2013.792778.
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  7. Robert Stern (2013). Hegel's Naturalism: Mind, Nature, and the Final Ends of Life. By Terry Pinkard. (Oxford UP, 2012. Pp. Xii + 213. Price £40.00.). [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 63 (251):393-395.
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  8. Robert Stern (2013). The Routledge Guide Book to Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit. Routledge.
    Prev. ed. pub.: Routledge philosophy guidebook to Hegel and the Phenomenology of spirit, 2002.
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  9. Robert Stern (2013). Whither Philosophy? Metaphilosophy 44 (3):222-229.
    This article considers possible future directions of philosophy, based around the experience of the author as editor of the European Journal of Philosophy for about a decade. After some discussion of the original impetus for the journal, and of how the philosophy scene has changed since it was founded in 1993, the article focuses particularly on the themes of transcendentalism and naturalism as likely to shape the philosophical debates of the future, as they have done in the past.
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  10. Robert Stern (2012). Argument From Autonomy. In Jimmy Lenman & Yonatan Shemmer (eds.), Constructivism in Practical Philosophy. Oxford University Press. 119.
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  11. Robert Stern (2012). A Reply to My Critics. Inquiry 55 (6):622-654.
    Abstract In this paper, I respond to three commentators on my book Understanding Moral Obligation: Kant, Hegel Kierkegaard. Anne Margaret Baxley focuses on my treatment of Kant, Dean Moyar on my treatment of Hegel, and William Bristow on my treatment of Kierkegaard. In this reply, I try to show how the critical points that they raise can be addressed.
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  12. Robert Stern (2012). Constructivism and the Argument From Autonomy. In Jimmy Lenman & Yonatan Shemmer (eds.), Constructivism in Practical Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
     
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  13. Robert Stern (2012). Editor's Pick. The Philosophers' Magazine 57 (57):102-104.
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  14. Robert Stern (2012). Is Hegel's Master–Slave Dialectic a Refutation of Solipsism? British Journal for the History of Philosophy 20 (2):333-361.
    This paper considers whether Hegel's master/slave dialectic in the Phenomenology of Spirit should be considered as a refutation of solipsism. It focuses on a recent and detailed attempt to argue for this sort of reading that has been proposed by Frederick Beiser ? but it argues that this reading is unconvincing, both in the historical motivations given for it in the work of Jacobi and Fichte, and as an interpretation of the text itself. An alternative reading of the dialectic is (...)
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  15. Robert Stern (2012). Taylor, Trascendental Arguments, and Hegel on Consciousness. Revista de Filosofía 44 (132):17-38.
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  16. Robert Stern (2012). Understanding Moral Obligation: Kant, Hegel, Kierkegaard. Cambridge University Press.
    In many histories of modern ethics, Kant is supposed to have ushered in an anti-realist or constructivist turn by holding that unless we ourselves 'author' or lay down moral norms and values for ourselves, our autonomy as agents will be threatened. In this book, Robert Stern challenges the cogency of this 'argument from autonomy', and claims that Kant never subscribed to it. Rather, it is not value realism but the apparent obligatoriness of morality that really poses a challenge to our (...)
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  17. Robert Stern (2012). Understanding Moral Obligation:A Précis. Inquiry 55 (6):563-566.
    Inquiry, Volume 55, Issue 6, Page 563-566, December 2012.
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  18. Robert Stern (2011). Transcendental Argument. In Joel Smith & Peter Sullivan (eds.), Transcendental Philosophy and Naturalism. Oxford University Press. 74.
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  19. Robert Stern (2011). The Development of Ethics: A Historical and Critical Study. Volume III: From Kant to Rawls. Journal of Moral Philosophy 8 (2):290-292.
  20. Robert Stern (2010). Moral Scepticism and Agency: Kant and Korsgaard. Ratio 23 (4):453-474.
    One argument put forward by Christine Korsgaard in favour of her constructivist appeal to the nature of agency, is that it does better than moral realism in answering moral scepticism. However, realists have replied by pressing on her the worry raised by H. A. Prichard, that any attempt to answer the moral sceptic only succeeds in basing moral actions in non-moral ends, and so is self-defeating. I spell out these issues in more detail, and suggest that both sides can learn (...)
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  21. Robert Stern (2009). Hegelian Metaphysics. Oxford University Press.
    The volume concludes by examining a critique of Hegel's metaphysical position from the perspective of the "continental" tradition, and in particular Gilles ...
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  22. Robert Stern (2009). Review: Forster, Kant and Skepticism. [REVIEW] Kantian Review 14 (1):141-146.
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  23. Robert Stern (2009). Kant and Skepticism, by Michael N. Forster. Princeton and Oxford: Princeton University Press, 2008. Pp. X + 154, Hardcover. ISBN 9780691129877. $29.95/£L7.95. [REVIEW] Kantian Review 14 (1):141-146.
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  24. Robert Stern (2009). The Autonomy of Morality and the Morality of Autonomy. Journal of Moral Philosophy 6 (3):395-415.
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  25. Robert Stern (2008). Hegel's Idealism. In Frederick C. Beiser (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Hegel and Nineteenth-Century Philosophy. Cambridge University Press. 137--74.
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  26. Robert Stern (2008). Kant's Response to Skepticism. In John Greco (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Skepticism. Oxford University Press. 265.
    Within much contemporary epistemology, Kant’s response to skepticism has come to be epitomized by an appeal to transcendental arguments. This form of argument is said to provide a distinctively Kantian way of dealing with the skeptic, by showing that what the skeptic questions is in fact a condition for her being able to raise that question in the first place, if she is to have language, thoughts, or experiences at all. In this way, it is hoped, the game played by (...)
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  27. Robert Stern (2007). Freedom, Self-Legislation and Morality in Kant and Hegel: Constructivist Vs. Realist Accounts. In Espen Hammer (ed.), German Idealism: Contemporary Perspectives. Routledge. 245--66.
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  28. Robert Stern (2007). Hegel, British Idealism, and the Curious Case of the Concrete Universal. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 15 (1):115 – 153.
    [INTRODUCTION] Like the terms 'dialectic', 'Aufhebung' (or 'sublation'), and 'Geist', the term 'concrete universal' has a distinctively Hegelian ring to it. But unlike these others, it is particularly associated with the British strand in Hegel's reception history, as having been brought to prominence by some of the central British Idealists. It is therefore perhaps inevitable that, as their star has waned, so too has any use of the term, while an appreciation of the problematic that lay behind it has seemingly (...)
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  29. Robert Stern (2007). Individual Existence and the Philosophy of Difference. In Brian Leiter & Michael Rosen (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Continental Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
     
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  30. Robert Stern (2007). Peirce, Hegel, and the Category of Secondness. Inquiry 50 (2):123 – 155.
    This paper focuses on one of C. S. Peirce's criticisms of G. W. F. Hegel: namely, that Hegel neglected to give sufficient weight to what Peirce calls "Secondness", in a way that put his philosophical system out of touch with reality. The nature of this criticism is explored, together with its relevant philosophical background. It is argued that while the issues Peirce raises go deep, in some respects Hegel's position is closer to his own than he may have realised, whilst (...)
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  31. Robert Stern (2007). Transcendental Arguments: A Plea for Modesty. Grazer Philosophische Studien 74 (1):143-161.
    A modest transcendental argument is one that sets out merely to establish how things need to appear to us or how we need to believe them to be, rather than how things are. Stroud's claim to have established that all transcendental arguments must be modest in this way is criticised and rejected. However, a different case for why we should abandon ambitious transcendental arguments is presented: namely, that when it comes to establishing claims about how things are, there is no (...)
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  32. Malcolm Seymour, Trevor Green, Audrey Healy, J. D. G. Evans, Richard Cross, James Ladyman, Katherine J. Morris, W. J. Mander, Christine Battersby, A. W. Moore, Robert Stern, Christopher Hookway, Bob Carruthers, Gary Russell, Dennis Hedlund, Alex Ridgway, Alexander Fyfe, Paul Farrer & Trevor Nichols (eds.) (2006). Western Philosophy. Kultur.
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  33. Robert Stern (2006). Hegel's Doppelsatz: A Neutral Reading. Journal of the History of Philosophy 44 (2):235-266.
    : This paper offers a distinctive interpretation of Hegel's Doppelsatz from the Preface to the Philosophy of Right: 'What is rational is actual; and what is actual is rational'. This has usually been interpreted either conservatively (as claiming that everything that is, is right or good) or progressively (that if the world were actual, it would be right or good, but that there is a distinction that can be drawn between existence and actuality). My aim in this paper is to (...)
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  34. Robert Stern (2006). Metaphysical Dogmatism, Humean Scepticism, Kantian Criticism. Kantian Review 11 (1):102-116.
  35. Robert Stern (2006). Review of Ellis, Fiona, Concepts and Reality in the History of Philosophy: Tracing a Philosophical Error From Locke to Bradley. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2006 (5).
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  36. Robert Stern (2004). Coherence as a Test for Truth. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 69 (2):296–326.
    This paper sets out to demonstrate that a contrast can be drawn between coherentism as an account of the structure of justification, and coherentism as a method of inquiry. Whereas the former position aims to offer an answer to the ‘regress of justification’ problem, the latter position claims that coherence plays a vital and indispensable role as a criterion of truth, given the fallibility of cognitive methods such as perception and memory. It is argued that ‘early’ coherentists like Bradley and (...)
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  37. Robert Stern (2004). Does ‘Ought’ Imply ‘Can’? And Did Kant Think It Does? Utilitas 16 (1):42-61.
    The aim of this article is twofold. First, it is argued that while the principle of ‘ought implies can’ is certainly plausible in some form, it is tempting to misconstrue it, and that this has happened in the way it has been taken up in some of the current literature. Second, Kant's understanding of the principle is considered. Here it is argued that these problematic conceptions put the principle to work in a way that Kant does not, so that there (...)
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  38. Robert Stern (2003). Introduction. In , Transcendental Arguments: Problems and Prospects. Clarendon Press.
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  39. Robert Stern (2003). Kant's Empirical Realism. Mind 112 (446):323-328.
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  40. Robert Stern (2003). On Kant's Response to Hume: The Second Analogy as Transcendental Argument. In , Transcendental Arguments: Problems and Prospects. Clarendon Press.
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  41. Robert Stern (2003). „On Strawson's Naturalistic Turn “. In Hans-Johann Glock (ed.), Strawson and Kant. Oxford University Press. 219--234.
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  42. Robert Stern (2003). Review: Kant's Empirical Realism. [REVIEW] Mind 112 (446):323-328.
  43. Robert Stern (2002). History, Meaning, and Interpretation: A Critical Response to Bevir. History of European Ideas 28 (1-2):1-12.
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  44. Robert Stern (2002). Routledge Philosophy Guidebook to Hegel and the Phenomenology of Spirit. Routledge.
    The Phenomenology of Spirit is Hegel's most important and famous work. It is essential to understanding Hegel's philosophical system and why he remains a major figure in western philosophy. Stern offers a clear and accessible introduction to what is undoubtedly one of the most complex books in the history of philosophy.
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  45. Robert Stern (2000). Transcendental Arguments and Scepticism: Answering the Question of Justification. Oxford University Press.
    Robert Stern investigates how scepticism can be countered by using transcendental arguments concerning the necessary conditions for the possibility of experience, language, or thought. He shows that the most damaging sceptical questions concern neither the certainty of our beliefs nor the reliability of our belief-forming methods, but rather how we can justify our beliefs.
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  46. Robert Stern (1999). Going Beyond the Kantian Philosophy: On McDowell's Hegelian Critique of Kant. European Journal of Philosophy 7 (2):247–269.
    The Kant-Hegel relation has a continuing fascination for commentators on Hegel, and understandably so: for, taking this route into the Hegelian jungle can promise many advantages. First, it can set Hegel’s thought against a background with which we are fairly familiar, and in a way that makes its relevance clearly apparent; second, it can help us locate Hegel in the broader philosophical tradition, making us see that the traditional ‘analytic’ jump from Kant to Frege leaves out a crucial period in (...)
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  47. Robert Stern (1999). Review: Guyer & Wood (Eds & Trs), Critique of Pure Reason. [REVIEW] Kantian Review 3:137-140.
  48. Robert Stern (1999). Immanuel Kant, Critique of Pure Reason. Translated and Edited by Paul Guyer and Allen W. Wood. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1998. Pp. Xi, 785. £50 (Hbk). ISBN 0-521-65729-6. [REVIEW] Kantian Review 3:137-140.
  49. Robert Stern (ed.) (1999). Transcendental Arguments: Problems and Prospects. Oxford University Press.
    In this volume of fourteen new essays, a distinguished team of philosophers offer a broad and stimulating examination of the nature, role, and value of transcendental arguments. Transcendental arguments aim to show that what is doubted or denied by the sceptic must be the case, as a condition for the possibility of experience, language, or thought. The essays consider how successful such arguments are as a response to sceptical problems.
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  50. Robert Stern (1994). British Hegelianism: A Non-Metaphysical View? European Journal of Philosophy 2 (3):293-321.
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