18 found
Sort by:
  1. Robert Stickgold (2013). Early to Bed: How Sleep Benefits Children's Memory. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 17 (6):261-262.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Robert Stickgold & Matthew Walker (2004). To Sleep, Perchance to Gain Creative Insight? Trends in Cognitive Sciences 8 (5):191-192.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Roar Fosse, Magdalena J. Fosse & Robert Stickgold (2003). Response to Schwartz: Dreaming and Episodic Memory. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (8):327-328.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. J. Allan Hobson, Edward F. Pace-Schott & Robert Stickgold (2003). Dreaming and the Brain: Toward a Cognitive Neuroscience of Conscious States. In Edward F. Pace-Schott, Mark Solms, Mark Blagrove & Stevan Harnad (eds.), Sleep and Dreaming: Scientific Advances and Reconsiderations. Cambridge University Press. 793-842.
    Sleep researchers in different disciplines disagree about how fully dreaming can be explained in terms of brain physiology. Debate has focused on whether REM sleep dreaming is qualitatively different from nonREM (NREM) sleep and waking. A review of psychophysiological studies shows clear quantitative differences between REM and NREM mentation and between REM and waking mentation. Recent neuroimaging and neurophysiological studies also differentiate REM, NREM, and waking in features with phenomenological implications. Both evidence and theory suggest that there are isomorphisms between (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. J. Allan Hobson, Edward F. Pace-Schott & Robert Stickgold (2000). Consciousness: Its Vicissitudes in Waking and Sleep. In Michael S. Gazzaniga (ed.), The New Cognitive Neurosciences: 2nd Edition. Mit Press.
  6. J. Allan Hobson, Edward F. Pace-Schott & Robert Stickgold (2000). Dreaming and the Brain: Toward a Cognitive Neuroscience of Conscious States. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):793-842; 904-1018; 1083-1121.
    Sleep researchers in different disciplines disagree about how fully dreaming can be explained in terms of brain physiology. Debate has focused on whether REM sleep dreaming is qualitatively different from nonREM (NREM) sleep and waking. A review of psychophysiological studies shows clear quantitative differences between REM and NREM mentation and between REM and waking mentation. Recent neuroimaging and neurophysiological studies also differentiate REM, NREM, and waking in features with phenomenological implications. Both evidence and theory suggest that there are isomorphisms between (...)
    Direct download (14 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. J. Allan Hobson, Edward F. Pace-Schott & Robert Stickgold (2000). Dream Science 2000: A Response to Commentaries on Dreaming and the Brain. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):1019-1035.
    Definitions of dreaming are not required to map formal features of mental activity onto brain measures. While dreaming occurs during all stages of sleep, intense dreaming is largely confined to REM. Forebrain structures and many neurotransmitters can contribute to sleep and dreaming without negating brainstem and aminergic-cholinergic control mechanisms. Reductionism is essential to science and AIM has considerable heuristic value. Recent findings support sleep's role in learning and memory. Emerging technologies may address long-standing issues in sleep and dream research.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Robert Stickgold (2000). Inclusive Versus Exclusive Approaches to Sleep and Dream Research. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):1011-1013.
    By assuming that REM sleep either plays a critical role in all memory consolidation or no role in any, Vertes & Eastman have chosen to reject, rather than explain, robust experimental findings of a role for sleep in memory and learning. In contrast, Nielsen has attempted to integrate conflicting findings in the dispute over REM versus NREM mentation. Researchers must trust the data more and the theories less, and build integrative rather than exclusionary models if they hope to resolve these (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Jason T. Rowley, Robert Stickgold & J. Allan Hobson (1998). Eyelid Movements and Mental Activity at Sleep Onset. Consciousness and Cognition 7 (1):67-84.
    The nature and time course of sleep onset mentation was studied in the home environment using the Nightcap, a reliable, cost-effective, and relatively noninvasive sleep monitor. The Nightcap, linked to a personal computer, reliably identified sleep onset according to changes in perceived sleepiness and the appearance of hypnagogic dream features. Awakenings were performed by the computer after 15 s to 5 min of sleep as defined by eyelid quiescence. Awakenings from longer periods of sleep were associated with an increase in (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. J. A. Hobson & Robert Stickgold (1994). A Neurocognitive Approach to Dreaming. Consciousness and Cognition 3 (1):1-15.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. J. Allan Hobson & Robert Stickgold (1994). Dreaming: A Neurocognitive Approach. Consciousness and Cognition 3 (1):1-15.
    The studies reported in the following articles are aimed at providing a comprehensive, detailed, and quantitative picture of cognition in human dreaming. Our main premises are that waking, REM sleep, and non-REM sleep represent physiologically distinct and identifiable brain states and that the differences between waking, REM, and NREM mentation reflect these physiological differences. We have studied dreams at a formal level of analysis and, in these papers, have studied the specific dream properties of emotions, bizarre transformations, scene shifts, and (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Jane M. Merritt, Robert Stickgold, Edward Pace-Schott, Julie Williams & J. Allan Hobson (1994). Emotion Profiles in the Dreams of Men and Women. Consciousness and Cognition 3 (1):46-60.
    We have investigated the emotional profile of dreams and the relationship between dream emotion and cognition using a form that specifically asked subjects to identify emotions within their dreams. Two hundred dream reports were collected from 20 subjects, each of whom produced 10 reports. Compared to previous studies, our method yielded a 10-fold increase in the amount of emotion reported. Anxiety/fear was reported most frequently, followed, in order, by joy/elation, anger, sadness, shame/guilt, and, least frequently, affection/eroticism. Unexpectedly, there was no (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Jody Resnick, Robert Stickgold, Cynthia D. Rittenhouse & J. Allan Hobson (1994). Self-Representation and Bizarreness in Children′s Dream Reports Collected in the Home Setting. Consciousness and Cognition 3 (1):30-45.
    We have conducted a home-based study of children′s dream reports in which parents used open-ended interviewing styles to collect 88 dream reports from their 4- to 10-year-old children in the comfortable and supportive environment of their own homes. Particular attention was paid to formal properties including characters , settings, self-representation, and bizarreness. In contrast to previous studies, our data indicate that young children are able to give long, detailed reports of their dreams that share many formal characteristics with adult dream (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Cynthia D. Rittenhouse, Robert Stickgold & J. Allan Hobson (1994). Constraint on the Transformation of Characters, Objects, and Settings in Dream Reports. Consciousness and Cognition 3 (1):100-113.
    To extend the hypothesis that bizarre discontinuities in dreams result from the interaction of chaotic, "bottom-up" brainstem activation with "top-down" cortical synthesis, we have performed a detailed analysis of dream discontinuities using a new methodology that allows for objective characterization of this formal dream feature. Transformations of characters and objects in dream reports were found to follow definite associational rules. While there were 11 examples of character–character transformation and 7 of inanimate object–inanimate object transformation, transformations of characters into inanimate objects (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Robert Stickgold, Edward Pace-Schott & J. Allan Hobson (1994). A New Paradigm for Dream Research: Mentation Reports Following Spontaneous Arousal From REM and NREM Sleep Recorded in a Home Setting. Consciousness and Cognition 3 (1):16-29.
    The "Nightcap," a relatively nonintrusive and "user-friendly" sleep monitoring system, was used by 11 subjects on 10 consecutive nights in their homes. Eighty-eight sleep mentation reports were obtained after spontaneous awakenings from Nightcap-identified REM sleep and 61 were obtained from NREM awakenings. Sleep mentation was recalled in 83% of REM reports and 54% of NREM reports. The median length of REM reports was 148 words compared to 21 words for NREM reports. Twenty-four percent of the REM reports were over 500 (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Robert Stickgold, Cynthia D. Rittenhouse & J. Allan Hobson (1994). Dream Splicing: A New Technique for Assessing Thematic Coherence in Subjective Reports of Mental Activity. Consciousness and Cognition 3 (1):114-128.
    A novel "dream splicing" technique allows the objective evaluation of thematic coherence in dreams. In this study, dream reports were cut into segments and segments randomly recombined to form spliced reports. Judges then attempted to distinguish spliced reports from intact ones. Five judges correctly scored 22 spliced and intact reports 82% of the time ; 13 of the 22 reports were correctly scored by all five judges . We conclude that most dream reports contain sufficient coherence to allow judges to (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Jeffrey P. Sutton, Cynthia D. Rittenhouse, Edward Pace-Schott, Jane M. Merritt, Robert Stickgold & J. Allan Hobson (1994). Emotion and Visual Imagery in Dream Reports: A Narrative Graphing Approach. Consciousness and Cognition 3 (1):89-99.
    To test the notion that shifts in visual imagery and attention are correlated with experiences of emotion, we studied 10 dream reports using an affirmative probe of emotion and a quantitative measure of plot discontinuity. We found that emotion, especially changes in emotion, are correlated with discontinuities in visual imagery. These correlations are quantified using a new graph theoretical method for analyzing narrative reports.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Jeffrey P. Sutton, Cynthia D. Rittenhouse, Edward Pace-Schott, Robert Stickgold & J. Allan Hobson (1994). A New Approach to Dream Bizarreness: Graphing Continuity and Discontinuity of Visual Attention in Narrative Reports. Consciousness and Cognition 3 (1):61-88.
    In this paper, a new method of quantitatively assessing continuity and discontinuity of visual attention is developed. The method is based on representing narrative information using graph theory. It is applicable to any type of narrative report. Since dream reports are often described as bizarre, and since bizarreness is partially characterized by discontinuities in plot, we chose to test our method on a set of dream data. Using specific criteria for identifying and arranging objects of visual attention, dream narratives from (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation