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  1. Robert Stickgold (2013). Early to Bed: How Sleep Benefits Children's Memory. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 17 (6):261-262.
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  2. Dara S. Manoach & Robert Stickgold (2009). Does Abnormal Sleep Impair Memory Consolidation in Schizophrenia? Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 3.
    Although disturbed sleep is a prominent feature of schizophrenia, its relation to the pathophysiology, signs, and symptoms of schizophrenia remains poorly understood. Sleep disturbances are well known to impair cognition in healthy individuals. Yet, in spite of its ubiquity in schizophrenia, abnormal sleep has generally been overlooked as a potential contributor to cognitive deficits. Amelioration of cognitive deficits is a current priority of the schizophrenia research community, but most efforts to define, characterize, and quantify cognitive deficits focus on cross-sectional measures. (...)
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  3. Robert Stickgold & Matthew Walker (2004). To Sleep, Perchance to Gain Creative Insight? Trends in Cognitive Sciences 8 (5):191-192.
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  4. Roar Fosse, Magdalena J. Fosse & Robert Stickgold (2003). Response to Schwartz: Dreaming and Episodic Memory. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (8):327-328.
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  5. J. Allan Hobson, Edward F. Pace-Schott & Robert Stickgold (2003). Dreaming and the Brain: Toward a Cognitive Neuroscience of Conscious States. In Edward F. Pace-Schott, Mark Solms, Mark Blagrove & Stevan Harnad (eds.), Sleep and Dreaming: Scientific Advances and Reconsiderations. Cambridge University Press. 793-842.
    Sleep researchers in different disciplines disagree about how fully dreaming can be explained in terms of brain physiology. Debate has focused on whether REM sleep dreaming is qualitatively different from nonREM (NREM) sleep and waking. A review of psychophysiological studies shows clear quantitative differences between REM and NREM mentation and between REM and waking mentation. Recent neuroimaging and neurophysiological studies also differentiate REM, NREM, and waking in features with phenomenological implications. Both evidence and theory suggest that there are isomorphisms between (...)
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  6. J. Allan Hobson, Edward F. Pace-Schott & Robert Stickgold (2000). Consciousness: Its Vicissitudes in Waking and Sleep. In Michael S. Gazzaniga (ed.), The New Cognitive Neurosciences: 2nd Edition. Mit Press.
  7. J. Allan Hobson, Edward F. Pace-Schott & Robert Stickgold (2000). Dreaming and the Brain: Toward a Cognitive Neuroscience of Conscious States. Behavioral And Brain Sciences 23 (6):793-842; 904-1018; 1083-1121.
    Sleep researchers in different disciplines disagree about how fully dreaming can be explained in terms of brain physiology. Debate has focused on whether REM sleep dreaming is qualitatively different from nonREM (NREM) sleep and waking. A review of psychophysiological studies shows clear quantitative differences between REM and NREM mentation and between REM and waking mentation. Recent neuroimaging and neurophysiological studies also differentiate REM, NREM, and waking in features with phenomenological implications. Both evidence and theory suggest that there are isomorphisms between (...)
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  8. J. Allan Hobson, Edward F. Pace-Schott & Robert Stickgold (2000). Dream Science 2000: A Response to Commentaries on Dreaming and the Brain. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):1019-1035.
    Definitions of dreaming are not required to map formal features of mental activity onto brain measures. While dreaming occurs during all stages of sleep, intense dreaming is largely confined to REM. Forebrain structures and many neurotransmitters can contribute to sleep and dreaming without negating brainstem and aminergic-cholinergic control mechanisms. Reductionism is essential to science and AIM has considerable heuristic value. Recent findings support sleep's role in learning and memory. Emerging technologies may address long-standing issues in sleep and dream research.
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  9. Robert Stickgold (2000). Inclusive Versus Exclusive Approaches to Sleep and Dream Research. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):1011-1013.
    By assuming that REM sleep either plays a critical role in all memory consolidation or no role in any, Vertes & Eastman have chosen to reject, rather than explain, robust experimental findings of a role for sleep in memory and learning. In contrast, Nielsen has attempted to integrate conflicting findings in the dispute over REM versus NREM mentation. Researchers must trust the data more and the theories less, and build integrative rather than exclusionary models if they hope to resolve these (...)
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  10. Jason T. Rowley, Robert Stickgold & J. Allan Hobson (1998). Eyelid Movements and Mental Activity at Sleep Onset. Consciousness and Cognition 7 (1):67-84.
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  11. J. A. Hobson & Robert Stickgold (1994). A Neurocognitive Approach to Dreaming. Consciousness and Cognition 3 (1):1-15.
     
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  12. J. Allan Hobson & Robert Stickgold (1994). Dreaming: A Neurocognitive Approach. Consciousness and Cognition 3 (1):1-15.
  13. Jane M. Merritt, Robert Stickgold, Edward Pace-Schott, Julie Williams & J. Allan Hobson (1994). Emotion Profiles in the Dreams of Men and Women. Consciousness and Cognition 3 (1):46-60.
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  14. Jody Resnick, Robert Stickgold, Cynthia D. Rittenhouse & J. Allan Hobson (1994). Self-Representation and Bizarreness in Children′s Dream Reports Collected in the Home Setting. Consciousness and Cognition 3 (1):30-45.
  15. Cynthia D. Rittenhouse, Robert Stickgold & J. Allan Hobson (1994). Constraint on the Transformation of Characters, Objects, and Settings in Dream Reports. Consciousness and Cognition 3 (1):100-113.
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  16. Robert Stickgold, Edward Pace-Schott & J. Allan Hobson (1994). A New Paradigm for Dream Research: Mentation Reports Following Spontaneous Arousal From REM and NREM Sleep Recorded in a Home Setting. Consciousness and Cognition 3 (1):16-29.
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  17. Robert Stickgold, Cynthia D. Rittenhouse & J. Allan Hobson (1994). Dream Splicing: A New Technique for Assessing Thematic Coherence in Subjective Reports of Mental Activity. Consciousness and Cognition 3 (1):114-128.
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  18. Jeffrey P. Sutton, Cynthia D. Rittenhouse, Edward Pace-Schott, Jane M. Merritt, Robert Stickgold & J. Allan Hobson (1994). Emotion and Visual Imagery in Dream Reports: A Narrative Graphing Approach. Consciousness and Cognition 3 (1):89-99.
  19. Jeffrey P. Sutton, Cynthia D. Rittenhouse, Edward Pace-Schott, Robert Stickgold & J. Allan Hobson (1994). A New Approach to Dream Bizarreness: Graphing Continuity and Discontinuity of Visual Attention in Narrative Reports. Consciousness and Cognition 3 (1):61-88.