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  1.  4
    Robert B. Talisse (2009). Democracy and Moral Conflict. Cambridge University Press.
    Why democracy? Most often this question is met with an appeal to some decidedly moral value, such as equality, liberty, dignity or even peace. But in contemporary democratic societies, there is deep disagreement and conflict about the precise nature and relative worth of these values. And when democracy votes, some of those who lose will see the prevailing outcome as not merely disappointing, but morally intolerable. How should citizens react when confronted with a democratic result that they regard as intolerable? (...)
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  2. Scott F. Aikin & Robert B. Talisse (2013). Why We Argue : A Guide to Political Disagreement. Routledge.
    Why We Argue : A Guide to Political Disagreement presents an accessible and engaging introduction to the theory of argument, with special emphasis on the way argument works in public political debate. The authors develop a view according to which proper argument is necessary for one’s individual cognitive health; this insight is then expanded to the collective health of one’s society. Proper argumentation, then, is seen to play a central role in a well-functioning democracy. Written in a lively style and (...)
     
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  3. Robert B. Talisse (2007). A Pragmatist Philosophy of Democracy : Communities of Inquiry. In Michael Beaney (ed.), The Analytic Turn: Analysis in Early Analytic Philosophy and Phenomenology. Routledge
    Email and ethics -- Causation and laws of nature -- Internalism and epistemology -- Einstein, relativity, and absolute simultaneity -- Epistemology modalized -- Truth and speech acts -- Fiction, narrative, and knowledge -- A pragmatist philosophy of democracy.
     
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  4.  7
    Robert B. Talisse (2013). Sustaining Democracy: Folk Epistemology and Social Conflict. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 16 (4):500-519.
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  5. Robert B. Talisse (2004). Towards a Peircean Politics of Inquiry. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 40 (1):21 - 38.
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  6.  21
    Robert Talisse & Scott F. Aikin (2006). Two Forms of the Straw Man. Argumentation 20 (3):345-352.
    The authors identify and offer an analysis of a new form of the Straw Man fallacy, and then explore the implications of the prevalence of this fallacy for contemporary political discourse.
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  7.  36
    Robert B. Talisse (2004). Does Public Ignorance Defeat Deliberative Democracy? Critical Review 16 (4):455-463.
    Abstract Richard Posner and Ilya Somin have recently posed forceful versions of a common objection to deliberative democracy, the Public Ignorance Objection. This objection holds that demonstrably high levels of public ignorance render deliberative democracy practically impossible. But the public?ignorance data show that the public is ignorant in a way that does not necessarily defeat deliberative democracy. Posner and Somin have overestimated the force of the Public Ignorance Objection, so the question of deliberative democracy's practical feasibility is still open.
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  8. Scott F. Aikin, Michael Harbour & Robert B. Talisse (2010). Nagel on Public Education and Intelligent Design. Journal of Philosophical Research 35:209-219.
    In a recent article, Thomas Nagel argues against the court’s decision to strike down the Dover school district’s requirement that biology teachers in Dover public schools inform their students about Intelligent Design. Nagel contends that this ruling relies on questionable demarcation between science and nonscience and consequently misapplies the Establishment Clause of the constitution. Instead, he argues in favor of making room for an open discussion of these issues rather than an outright prohibition against Intelligent Design. We contend that Nagel’s (...)
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  9.  11
    Robert B. Talisse (2004). Can Value Pluralists Be Comprehensive Liberals? Galston's Liberal Pluralism. Contemporary Political Theory 3 (2):127.
    In this paper, the author engages William Galston's recent attempt to revive the Berlinian project of developing a comprehensive theory of liberalism from value pluralist premises. The author's argument maintains that, despite Galston's attempts, the value pluralist in fact has no resources with which to recommend a liberal political order over a variety of illiberal regimes, and that, further, Galston's own justificatory strategy is indistinguishable from the later Rawls's noncomprehensive, ‘political' liberalism. Although the argument engages the work of Berlin and (...)
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  10. Robert B. Talisse & Scott F. Aikin (2005). Still Searching for a Pragmatist Pluralism. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 41 (1):145 - 160.
  11. Robert B. Talisse (2013). A Pragmatist Philosophy of Democracy. Routledge.
    In recent years there has been a renewed interest in American pragmatism. In political philosophy, the revival of pragmatism has led to a new appreciation for the democratic theory of John Dewey. In this book, Robert B. Talisse advances a series of pragmatic arguments against Deweyan democracy. Particularly, Talisse argues that Deweyan democracy cannot adequately recognize pluralism , the fact that intelligent, sincere, and well-intentioned persons can disagree sharply and reasonably over moral ideals. Drawing upon the epistemology of the founder (...)
     
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  12.  14
    Scott F. Aikin & Robert B. Talisse (2015). Reply to Joshua Anderson. The Pluralist 10 (3):335-343.
    We are pleased to find that our 2005 paper “Why Pragmatists Cannot Be Pluralists” continues to draw critical attention. It seems to us that despite the many responses to our paper, its central challenge has not been met. That challenge is for pragmatists to articulate a genuine pluralism that is consistent with their broader commitments. Unfortunately, much of the wrangling over our paper has aimed to capture the word “pluralism” for pragmatist deployment; little has been done to clarify what that (...)
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  13.  6
    Andrew T. Forcehimes & Robert B. Talisse (forthcoming). Belief and the Error Theory. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-8.
    A new kind of debate about the normative error theory has emerged. Whereas longstanding debates have fixed on the error theory’s plausibility, this new debate concerns the theory’s believability. Bart Streumer is the chief proponent of the error theory’s unbelievability. In this brief essay, we argue that Streumer’s argument prevails against extant critiques, and then press a criticism of our own.
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  14. Robert B. Talisse (2001). Liberty, Community, and Democracy: Sidney Hook's Pragmatic Deliberativism. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 15 (4):286-304.
  15. Robert B. Talisse (2008). Toward a Social Epistemic Comprehensive Liberalism. Episteme 5 (1):pp. 106-128.
    For well over a decade, much of liberal political theory has accepted the founding premise of Rawls's political liberalism, according to which the fact of reasonable pluralism renders comprehensive versions of liberalism incoherent. However, the founding premise presumes that all comprehensive doctrines are moral doctrines. In this essay, the author builds upon recent work by Allen Buchanan and develops a comprehensive version of liberalism based in a partially comprehensive social epistemic doctrine. The author then argues that this version of liberalism (...)
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  16.  45
    Robert Talisse & Scott Aikin (2007). Kitcher on the Ethics of Inquiry. Journal of Social Philosophy 38 (4):654-665.
    The thesis that scientific inquiry must operate within moral constraints is familiar and unobjectionable in cases involving immoral treatment of experimental subjects, as in the infamous Tuskegee experiments. However, in Science, Truth, and Democracy1 and related work,2 Philip Kitcher envisions a more controversial set of constraints. Specifically, he argues that inquiry ought not to be pursued in cases where the consequences of its pursuit are likely to affect negatively the lives of individuals who comprise a socially underprivileged group. This constraint (...)
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  17.  14
    Robert B. Talisse (2008). Pragmatism: A Guide for the Perplexed. Continuum.
    The origins of pragmatism -- Pragmatism and epistemology -- Pragmatism and truth -- Pragmatism and metaphysics -- Pragmatism and ethics -- Pragmatism and politics -- Pragmatism and environmental ethics.
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  18.  15
    Andrew T. Forcehimes & Robert B. Talisse (2013). Clarifying Cohen: A Response to Jubb and Hall. Res Publica 19 (4):371-379.
    In this brief essay, we clarify Cohen’s ‘Facts and Principles’ argument, and then argue that the objections posed by two recent critiques of Cohen—Robert Jubb (Res Publica 15:337–353, 2009) and Edward Hall (Res Publica 19:173–181, 2013)—look especially vulnerable to the charge of being self-defeating. It may still be that Cohen’s view concerning facts and principles is false. Our aim here is merely to show that two recent attempts to demonstrate its falsity are unlikely to succeed.
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  19.  18
    Robert B. Talisse (2010). Reply to Festenstein. Contemporary Political Theory 9 (1):45.
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  20.  4
    Robert B. Talisse (2010). An Epistemological Defense of Democracy. Critical Review 22 (2-3):281-291.
    Folk epistemology?the idea that one can't help believing that one's beliefs are true?provides an alternative to political theorists' inadequate defenses of democracy. It implicitly suggests a dialectical, truth-seeking norm for dealing with people who do not share one's own beliefs. Folk epistemology takes us beyond Mill's consequentialist claim for democracy (that the free array of opinions in a deliberative democracy leads us to the truth); instead, the epistemic freedom of the democratic process itself makes citizens confident that evidence for one's (...)
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  21. Robert B. Talisse (2001). On Rawls. Wadsworth.
  22.  38
    Robert B. Talisse (2011). Pluralism and Liberal Politics. Routledge.
    In this book, Robert Talisse critically examines the moral and political implications of pluralism, the view that our best moral thinking is indeterminate and that moral conflict is an inescapable feature of the human condition. Through a careful engagement with the work of William James, Isaiah Berlin, John Rawls, and their contemporary followers, Talisse distinguishes two broad types of moral pluralism: metaphysical and epistemic. After arguing that metaphysical pluralism does not offer a compelling account of value and thus cannot ground (...)
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  23.  30
    Robert Talisse (2005). Why Pragmatists Cannot Be Pluralists. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 41 (1):101 - 118.
    Contemporary pragmatists frequently claim to be pluralists, but infrequently say what this commitment means. The authors argue that pragmatism is inconsistent with any commitment that can plausibly be called pluralism.
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  24.  2
    Robert B. Talisse (2006). Democracy and Ignorance: Reply to Friedman. Critical Review 18 (4):453-466.
    Several distinct epistemic states may be properly characterized as states of ?ignorance.? It is not clear that the ?public ignorance? on which Jeffrey Friedman bases his critique of social democracy is objectionable, because it is not evident which of these epistemic states is at issue. Moreover, few extant theories of democracy defend it on the grounds that it produces good outcomes, rather than because its procedures are just. And even the subcategory of democratic theories that focus on epistemic issues take (...)
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  25.  2
    D. Micah Hester & Robert Talisse (2009). Physician Deception and Patient Autonomy. American Journal of Bioethics 9 (12):22-23.
  26.  34
    Robert B. Talisse (2007). From Pragmatism to Perfectionism: Cheryl Misak's Epistemic Deliberativism. Philosophy and Social Criticism 33 (3):387-406.
    In recent work, Cheryl Misak has developed a novel justification of deliberative democracy rooted in Peircean epistemology. In this article, the author expands Misak's arguments to show that not only does Peircean pragmatism provide a justification for deliberative democracy that is more compelling than the justifications offered by competing liberal and discursivist views, but also fixes a specific conception of deliberative politics that is perfectionist rather than neutralist. The article concludes with a discussion of whether the `epistemic perfectionism' implied by (...)
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  27.  25
    Robert B. Talisse (2011). Toward a New Pragmatist Politics. Metaphilosophy 42 (5):552-571.
    In A Pragmatist Philosophy of Democracy, I launched a pragmatist critique of Deweyan democracy and a pragmatist defense of an alternative view of democracy, one based in C. S. Peirce's social epistemology. In this article, I develop a more precise version of the criticism of Deweyan democracy I proposed in A Pragmatist Philosophy of Democracy, and provide further details of the Peircean alternative. Along the way, some recent critics are addressed.
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  28.  6
    Robert B. Talisse (2000). Two‐Faced Liberalism: John Gray's Pluralist Politics and the Reinstatement of Enlightenment Liberalism. Critical Review 14 (4):441-458.
    Abstract In Two Faces of Liberalism, John Gray pursues the dual agenda of condemning familiar liberal theories for perpetuating the failed ?Enlightenment project,? and promoting his own version of anti?Enlightenment liberalism, which he calls ?modus vivendi.? However, Gray's critical apparatus is insufficient to capture accurately the highly influential ?political? liberalism of John Rawls. Moreover, Gray's modus vivendi faces serious challenges raised by Rawls concerning stability. In order to respond to the Rawlsian objections, Gray would have to reinstate the aspirations and (...)
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  29.  17
    Robert Talisse (2000). Manifesto of a Passionate Moderate. Newsletter of the Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy 28 (87):29-31.
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  30.  17
    Robert Talisse (1995). Understanding John Dewey. Newsletter of the Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy 23 (72):14-16.
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  31.  29
    Robert B. Talisse (2005). Deliberative Democracy Defended: A Response to Posner's Political Realism. Res Publica 11 (2):185-199.
  32.  16
    Robert B. Talisse (2005). Liberalism, Pluralism, and Political Justification. The Harvard Review of Philosophy 13 (2):57-72.
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  33.  16
    Robert Talisse (2001). Time in the Ditch. Newsletter of the Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy 29 (89):41-42.
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  34.  18
    Robert B. Talisse (2003). Teaching Plato's Euthyphro Dialogically. Teaching Philosophy 26 (2):163-175.
    If one interprets Plato’s dialogues using the dialogical mode, then the principal philosophical significance of the work is not exhausted by the arguments put forward by its characters. Integral to the dialogical mode involves a consideration of the purpose of investigating a philosophical issue in the form of a dialogue rather than a treatise. But Plato’s dialogues should not only be understood in a dialogical mode but instructors should also teach using this mode of interrogation. This paper describes a new (...)
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  35.  34
    Robert B. Talisse (2001). On the Supposed Tension in Peirce's “Fixation of Belief”. Journal of Philosophical Research 26:561-569.
    Recent commentaries on “The Fixation of Belief” have located and emphasized an inconsistency or “tension” in Peirce’s central argument. On the one hand, Peirce maintains that “the settlement of opinion is the sole object of inquiry”; on the other, he wants to establish that the method of science is superior to all other methods of inquiry. The tension arises from the fact that whereas Peirce dismisses the methods of tenacity, authority, and a priority on the grounds that they cannot fulfill (...)
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  36.  42
    Robert B. Talisse (2005). Deliberativist Responses to Activist Challenges: A Continuation of Young’s Dialectic. Philosophy and Social Criticism 31 (4):423-444.
    In a recent article, Iris Marion Young raises several challenges to deliberative democracy on behalf of political activists. In this paper, the author defends a version of deliberative democracy against the activist challenges raised by Young and devises challenges to activism on behalf of the deliberative democrat. Key Words: activism • deliberative democracy • Discourse • Ideology • public sphere • I. M. Young.
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  37. Robert Talisse (2004). Dewey’s Defense of Democracy. Free Inquiry 24.
     
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  38.  8
    Robert Talisse (2006). Socratic Citizenship. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 13 (2):4-10.
    For contemporary democrats, Socrates is a paradox: he is both the paragon of intellectual integrity and the archenemy of democracy. In this essay, the author attempts to navigate this paradox. By offering a revised account of the Socratic elenchus and an examination of Socrates’ objections to democracy, the author proposes a view according to which Socrates provides a compelling image of democracy citizenship. This image is then used to criticize and inform current versions of deliberative democracy.
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  39.  53
    Scott F. Aikin, Michael Harbour, Jonathan A. Neufeld & Robert B. Talisse (2010). Epistemic Abstainers, Epistemic Martyrs, and Epistemic Converts. Logos and Episteme 1 (2):211-219.
    An intuitive view regarding the epistemic significance of disagreement says that when epistemic peers disagree, they should suspend judgment. This abstemious view seems to embody a kind of detachment appropriate for rational beings; moreover, it seems to promote a kind of conciliatory inclination that makes for irenic and cooperative further discussion. Like many strategies for cooperation, however, the abstemious view creates opportunities for free-riding. In this essay, the authors argue that the believer who suspends judgment in the face of peer (...)
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  40.  66
    Robert B. Talisse (2011). Value Pluralism and Liberal Politics. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 14 (1):87-100.
    Contemporary Neo-Berlinians contend that value pluralism is the best account of the moral universe we inhabit; they also contend that value pluralism provides a powerful case for liberalism. In this paper, I challenge both claims. Specifically, I will examine the arguments offered in support of value pluralism; finding them lacking, I will then offer some reasons for thinking that value pluralism is not an especially promising view of our moral universe.
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  41.  7
    Robert B. Talisse (2016). Reply to Karin Jønch-Clausen and Klemens Kappel. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 19 (1):267-271.
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  42.  73
    Robert Talisse, Book Reviews. [REVIEW]
    No one wishing to possess a concise yet conceptually comprehensive account of the questions bedeviling liberalism—all topics are tracked with a fine bibliography—will be disappointed with Robert B. Talisse’s Democracy After Liberalism. While special attention is given to liberalism’s theoretical and practical relations with democracy and citizenship, widely documented troubles within historically democratic cultures motivate and contextualize the analysis. Since we need “a deliberative account of democracy that is not precommitted to liberal or antiliberal goals” (p. 95), Talisse aims to (...)
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  43.  17
    Robert B. Talisse (2013). Religion in Politics: What's the Problem? [REVIEW] Think 12 (33):65-73.
    Research Articles Robert B. Talisse, Think, FirstView Article.
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  44.  29
    Robert B. Talisse (2001). A Pragmatist Critique of Richard Rorty's Hopeless Politics. Southern Journal of Philosophy 39 (4):611-626.
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  45.  73
    Robert B. Talisse (2010). Does Value Pluralism Entail Liberalism? Journal of Moral Philosophy 7 (3):303-320.
    Isaiah Berlin repeatedly attempted to derive liberalism from value pluralism. It is generally agreed that Berlin 's arguments fail; however, neo-Berlinians have taken up the project of securing the entailment. This paper begins with an account of why the Berlinian project seems attractive to contemporary theorists. I then examine Berlin 's argument. With this background in place, I argue that recent attempts by William Galston and George Crowder to rescue the Berlinian project do not succeed.
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  46.  21
    Robert Talisse (2006). Socratic Citizenship. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 13 (2):4-10.
    For contemporary democrats, Socrates is a paradox: he is both the paragon of intellectual integrity and the archenemy of democracy. In this essay, the author attempts to navigate this paradox. By offering a revised account of the Socratic elenchus and an examination of Socrates’ objections to democracy, the author proposes a view according to which Socrates provides a compelling image of democracy citizenship. This image is then used to criticize and inform current versions of deliberative democracy.
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  47.  68
    Robert Talisse, Précis of Democracy After Liberalism.
    Democracy After Liberalism (Routledge, 2005) argues for a non-liberal interpretation of democratic politics. The argument of the book moves in two stages. First, a case is made against liberalism, the dominant interpretation of democratic politics. I argue that liberalism suffers an internal tension between its conception of legitimacy and its neutralist stance towards the good; this internal tension manifests in palpable external social ills that liberalism cannot sufficiently remedy. Second, an alternative, “post liberal” view is developed according to which democracy (...)
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  48.  9
    Robert Talisse (2002). Charles S. Peirce's Philosophy of Signs. Review of Metaphysics 55 (3):624-625.
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  49. Robert Talisse (2004). Democracy After Liberalism: Pragmatism and Deliberative Politics. Routledge.
    This book critically evaluates liberalism, the dominant attempt in the tradition of political philosophy to provide a philosophical foundation for democracy, and argues for a conception of deliberative democracy to meet this need.
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  50.  69
    Robert Talisse, From Pragmatism to Perfectionism.
    Philosophy & Social Criticism, 33.3 (2007): 387-406.
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