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Robert B. Talisse [78]Robert Talisse [28]
  1. Robert Talisse, Flathman on Pluralism and Liberal Democracy.
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  2. Robert Talisse, From Pragmatism to Perfectionism.
    Philosophy & Social Criticism, 33.3 (2007): 387-406.
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  3. Robert Talisse, A Folk Epistemic Justificaiotn of Democracy.
    The author develops a "folk" epistemology and shows that the theoretical commitments underlying our everyday practices of assertaion, belief, and challenge provide a justification of democratic politics that transcends deep divisions at the level of citizens' moral and religious comprehensive doctrines.
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  4. Robert Talisse, Pluralism and Liberal Legitimacy.
    Pluralism frustrates liberalism's conception of legitimacy. The attempts by Rawls and Galston to preserve liberal legitimacy in light of pluralism are critically engaged, and found lacking. The paper closes with a sketch of an "agonistic" liberalism.
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  5. Robert B. Talisse, Response to Ralston.
    My response to Ralston's paper "In Defense of Democracy as a Way of Life," both presented at the Eastern APA meeting (2008).
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  6. Robert Talisse, Book Reviews. [REVIEW]
    No one wishing to possess a concise yet conceptually comprehensive account of the questions bedeviling liberalism—all topics are tracked with a fine bibliography—will be disappointed with Robert B. Talisse’s Democracy After Liberalism. While special attention is given to liberalism’s theoretical and practical relations with democracy and citizenship, widely documented troubles within historically democratic cultures motivate and contextualize the analysis. Since we need “a deliberative account of democracy that is not precommitted to liberal or antiliberal goals” (p. 95), Talisse aims to (...)
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  7. Robert Talisse, Deliberativist Responses to Activist Challenges.
    In a recent article, Iris Marion Young raises several challenges to deliberative democracy on behalf of political activists. In this paper, the author defends a version of deliberative democracy against the activist challenges raised by Young and devises challenges to activism on behalf of the deliberative democrat.
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  8. Robert Talisse, Précis of Democracy After Liberalism.
    Democracy After Liberalism (Routledge, 2005) argues for a non-liberal interpretation of democratic politics. The argument of the book moves in two stages. First, a case is made against liberalism, the dominant interpretation of democratic politics. I argue that liberalism suffers an internal tension between its conception of legitimacy and its neutralist stance towards the good; this internal tension manifests in palpable external social ills that liberalism cannot sufficiently remedy. Second, an alternative, “post liberal” view is developed according to which democracy (...)
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  9. Robert Talisse, R o B E R T B . Ta L I S s E.
    Contemporary liberal democracy employs a conception of legitimacy according to which political decisions and institutions must be at least in principle justifiable to all citizens. This conception of legitimacy is difficult to satisfy when citizens are deeply divided at the level of fundamental moral, religious, and philosophical commitments. Many have followed the later Rawls in holding that where a reasonable pluralism of such commitments persists, political justification must eschew appeal to any controversial moral, religious, or philosophical premises. In this way, (...)
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  10. Robert Talisse, Stout on Public Reason.
    In his _Democracy and Tradition_, Jeffrey Stout confronts the problem of religious reasons in public deliberation. He finds Rawlsian "public reason" proposals unsatisfactory, and attempts to devise a better account. The authors argue that Stout's view does not avoid the problems attenindg the Rawlsian position.
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  11. Robert B. Talisse, A Farewell to Deweyan Democracy: Towards a New Pragmatist Politics.
    The revival of pragmatism has brought renewed enthusiasm for John Dewey's conception of democracy. Drawing upon Rawlsian concerns regarding the fact of reasonable pluralism, the author argues that Deweyan democracy is unworthy of resurrection. A modified version of Deweyan democracy recently proposed by Elizabeth Anderson is then taken up and also found to be lacking. Then the author proposes a model of democracy that draws upon Peirce's social epistemology. The result is a non-Deweyan but nonetheless pragmatist option in democratic theory.
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  12. Robert B. Talisse, Folk Epistemology and the Justification of Democracy.
    In introduce the concept of a "folk epistemology" and argue that norms arising from our folk epistemic commitments provide a compelling social epistemic justification for democratic political norms.
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  13. Robert B. Talisse, Social Epistemic Liberalism.
    The author builds upon recent work by Allen Buchanan and develops a comprehensive version of liberalism based in a partially comprehensive social epistemic doctrine. The author then argues that this version of liberalism is sufficiently accommodating of the fact of reasonable pluralism. The conclusion is that the founding premise of political liberalism admits of a counterexample; there is a version of comprehensive liberalism that is sufficiently pluralistic.
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  14. Michael Barnhardt, F. Thomas Burke, D. Micah Hester, Robert B. Talisse & Allen Carlson (forthcoming). Alperson, Philip, Ed. Diversity and Community: An Interdisciplinary Reader. Oxford: Blackwell, 2002.£ 55.00;£ 16.99 Pb. Audi, Robert. Epistemology: A Contemporary Introduction to the Theory of Knowledge, New York: Routledge, 2003. $22.95 Pb. [REVIEW] Philosophy Today.
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  15. Robert Talisse (forthcoming). Democracy and Moral Conflict. Philosophy.
    Why democracy? Most often this question is met with an appeal to some decidedly moral value, such as equality, liberty, dignity, or even peace. But in contemporary democratic societies, there is deep disagreement and conflict about the precise nature and relative worth of these values. And when democracy votes, some of those who lose will see the prevailing outcome as not merely disappointing, but morally intolerable. How should citizens react when confronted with a democratic result that they regard as intolerable? (...)
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  16. Robert B. Talisse (2015). Engaging Political Philosophy: An Introduction. Routledge.
    First published in 2014. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
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  17. Cheryl Misak & Robert B. Talisse (2014). Debate: Pragmatist Epistemology and Democratic Theory: A Reply to Eric MacGilvray. Journal of Political Philosophy 22 (3):366-376.
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  18. Robert B. Talisse (2014). Moral Authority and the Deliberative Model. Philosophical Studies 170 (3):555-561.
    Gerald Gaus’s The Order of Public Reason: A Theory of Freedom and Morality in a Diverse and Bounded World is refreshingly ambitious. It seems to me that our field today is a little too eager to “[stay] on the surface, philosophically speaking” (Rawls 1999, p. 395; cf. 2005, p. 10). However, the scope of Gaus’s ambition complicates the critic’s task. When a philosophical work aims to present something as grand as a “theory of freedom and morality,” it seems plausible to (...)
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  19. Robert B. Talisse (2014). Pragmatist Political Philosophy. Philosophy Compass 9 (2):123-130.
    This essay surveys three prominent trends in current pragmatist political philosophy: Deweyan Democratic Perfectionism, Rortyan Ironism, and Pragmatist Epistemic Deliberativism. After articulating the main commitments of each view, the author raises philosophical problems each must confront. The essay closes with the more general criticism that pragmatist political theory has been nearly exclusively focused on democracy, but needs to address additional topics.
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  20. Scott F. Aikin & Robert B. Talisse (2013). Matters of Conscience. The Philosophers' Magazine 61 (61):113-114.
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  21. Scott F. Aikin & Robert B. Talisse (2013). Why We Argue (and How We Should): A Guide to Political Disagreement. Routledge.
    Why We Argue (And How We Should): A Guide to Political Disagreement presents an accessible and engaging introduction to the theory of argument, with special emphasis on the way argument works in public political debate. The authors develop a view according to which proper argument is necessary for one’s individual cognitive health; this insight is then expanded to the collective health of one’s society. Proper argumentation, then, is seen to play a central role in a well-functioning democracy. Written in a (...)
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  22. Andrew T. Forcehimes & Robert B. Talisse (2013). Clarifying Cohen: A Response to Jubb and Hall. Res Publica 19 (4):371-379.
    In this brief essay, we clarify Cohen’s ‘Facts and Principles’ argument, and then argue that the objections posed by two recent critiques of Cohen—Robert Jubb (Res Publica 15:337–353, 2009) and Edward Hall (Res Publica 19:173–181, 2013)—look especially vulnerable to the charge of being self-defeating. It may still be that Cohen’s view concerning facts and principles is false. Our aim here is merely to show that two recent attempts to demonstrate its falsity are unlikely to succeed.
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  23. Robert B. Talisse (2013). Altruism and Self‐Sacrifice. Journal of Social Philosophy 44 (2):112-114.
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  24. Robert B. Talisse (2013). A Pragmatist Philosophy of Democracy. Routledge.
    In recent years there has been a renewed interest in American pragmatism. In political philosophy, the revival of pragmatism has led to a new appreciation for the democratic theory of John Dewey. In this book, Robert B. Talisse advances a series of pragmatic arguments against Deweyan democracy. Particularly, Talisse argues that Deweyan democracy cannot adequately recognize pluralism , the fact that intelligent, sincere, and well-intentioned persons can disagree sharply and reasonably over moral ideals. Drawing upon the epistemology of the founder (...)
     
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  25. Robert B. Talisse (2013). Democratic Authority and the Separation of Church and State, by Robert Audi. Mind 122 (487):fzt083.
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  26. Robert B. Talisse (2013). Recovering American Philosophy. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 49 (3):424-433.
    In The American Pragmatists Cheryl Misak (2013) offers a highly compelling and nuanced account of pragmatism’s founding and development. Her narrative is also unorthodox, as it undermines the story of pragmatism’s past that prevails among contemporary classical pragmatists.1 That Misak gladly acknowledges the deep sympathies between pragmatism and logical empiricism (2013: 156) is enough to place The American Pragmatists far outside the mainstream of classicalists’ self-understanding. Refreshingly, Misak’s book demonstrates just how distorted that self-understanding is. Yet Misak’s achievement is not (...)
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  27. Robert B. Talisse (2013). Religion in Politics: What's the Problem? [REVIEW] Think 12 (33):65-73.
    Research Articles Robert B. Talisse, Think , FirstView Article.
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  28. Robert B. Talisse (2013). Sustaining Democracy: Folk Epistemology and Social Conflict. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 16 (4):500-519.
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  29. Robert B. Talisse (2013). Why Pragmatists Should Be Rawlsians. Southwest Philosophy Review 29 (1):71-78.
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  30. Alain Badiou, Miguel Beistegui, David Boersema, Steven M. Cahn, Robert B. Talisse, Adam Rosen-Carole, Todd Mayers, Françoise Dastur, Juan Manuel Garrido & Boris Gasparov (2012). Lisa Marie Anderson, Hamann and the Tradition (Evanston: Northwestern University Press, 2012). David Appelbaum, À Propos, Levinas (Albany: SUNY Press, 2012). Alain Badiou, The Adventure of French Philosophy, Trans. Bruno Bosteels (New York: Verso Press, 2012). [REVIEW] Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 33 (2).
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  31. Steven M. Cahn & Robert B. Talisse (eds.) (2012). Political Philosophy in the Twenty-First Century: Essential Essays. Westview Press.
     
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  32. Robert B. Talisse (2012). Reply to Rondel. Southwest Philosophy Review 28 (2):81-85.
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  33. Robert B. Talisse (2012). The Cambridge Companion to Dewey Molly Cochran (Ed). Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 48 (1):112-114.
  34. Robert B. Talisse (2012). The Cambridge Companion to Dewey (Review). Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society: A Quarterly Journal in American Philosophy 48 (1):112-114.
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  35. Scott Aikin & Robert Talisse (2011). Argument in Mixed Company: Mom's Maxim Vs. Mill's Principle. Think 10 (27):31-43.
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  36. Scott Aikin & Robert Talisse (2011). Politics, for God's Sake. The Philosophers' Magazine 54 (54):106-107.
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  37. Robert B. Talisse (2011). Comment on Clanton and Forcehimes. Southwest Philosophy Review 27 (2):79-81.
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  38. Robert B. Talisse (2011). John Dewey's Quest for Unity: The Journey of a Promethean Mystic – Richard M. Gale. Philosophical Quarterly 61 (245):863-864.
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  39. Robert B. Talisse (2011). Pluralism and Liberal Politics. Routledge.
    In this book, Robert Talisse critically examines the moral and political implications of pluralism, the view that our best moral thinking is indeterminate and that moral conflict is an inescapable feature of the human condition. Through a careful engagement with the work of William James, Isaiah Berlin, John Rawls, and their contemporary followers, Talisse distinguishes two broad types of moral pluralism: metaphysical and epistemic. After arguing that metaphysical pluralism does not offer a compelling account of value and thus cannot ground (...)
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  40. Robert B. Talisse (2011). Toward a New Pragmatist Politics. Metaphilosophy 42 (5):552-571.
    In A Pragmatist Philosophy of Democracy, I launched a pragmatist critique of Deweyan democracy and a pragmatist defense of an alternative view of democracy, one based in C. S. Peirce's social epistemology. In this article, I develop a more precise version of the criticism of Deweyan democracy I proposed in A Pragmatist Philosophy of Democracy, and provide further details of the Peircean alternative. Along the way, some recent critics are addressed.
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  41. Robert B. Talisse (2011). Value Pluralism and Liberal Politics. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 14 (1):87-100.
    Contemporary Neo-Berlinians contend that value pluralism is the best account of the moral universe we inhabit; they also contend that value pluralism provides a powerful case for liberalism. In this paper, I challenge both claims. Specifically, I will examine the arguments offered in support of value pluralism; finding them lacking, I will then offer some reasons for thinking that value pluralism is not an especially promising view of our moral universe.
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  42. Scott F. Aikin, Michael Harbour, Jonathan A. Neufeld & Robert B. Talisse (2010). Epistemic Abstainers, Epistemic Martyrs, and Epistemic Converts. Logos and Episteme 1 (2):211-219.
    An intuitive view regarding the epistemic significance of disagreement says that when epistemic peers disagree, they should suspend judgment. This abstemious view seems to embody a kind of detachment appropriate for rational beings; moreover, it seems to promote a kind of conciliatory inclination that makes for irenic and cooperative further discussion. Like many strategies for cooperation, however, the abstemious view creates opportunities for free-riding. In this essay, the authors argue that the believer who suspends judgment in the face of peer (...)
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  43. Scott F. Aikin, Michael Harbour & Robert B. Talisse (2010). Nagel on Public Education and Intelligent Design. Journal of Philosophical Research 35:209-219.
    In a recent article, Thomas Nagel argues against the court’s decision to strike down the Dover school district’s requirement that biology teachers in Dover public schools inform their students about Intelligent Design. Nagel contends that this ruling relies on questionable demarcation between science and nonscience and consequently misapplies the Establishment Clause of the constitution. Instead, he argues in favor of making room for an open discussion of these issues rather than an outright prohibition against Intelligent Design. We contend that Nagel’s (...)
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  44. Scott Aikin, Michael Harbour & Robert Talisse (2010). Evolution, Intelligent Design and Public Education: A Comment on Thomas Nagel. Spontaneous Generations 3 (1):35-40.
    Thomas Nagel recently proposed that the exclusion of Intelligent Design from science classrooms is inappropriate and that there needs to be room for “noncommittal discussion.” It is shown that Nagel’s policy proposals do not ?t the conclusions of his arguments.
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  45. Robert B. Talisse (2010). Author Copy. Contemporary Political Theory 9:45-49.
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  46. Robert B. Talisse (2010). An Epistemological Defense of Democracy. Critical Review 22 (2-3):281-291.
    Folk epistemology?the idea that one can't help believing that one's beliefs are true?provides an alternative to political theorists' inadequate defenses of democracy. It implicitly suggests a dialectical, truth-seeking norm for dealing with people who do not share one's own beliefs. Folk epistemology takes us beyond Mill's consequentialist claim for democracy (that the free array of opinions in a deliberative democracy leads us to the truth); instead, the epistemic freedom of the democratic process itself makes citizens confident that evidence for one's (...)
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  47. Robert B. Talisse (2010). Brill Online Books and Journals. Journal of Moral Philosophy 7 (3).
     
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  48. Robert B. Talisse (2010). Does Value Pluralism Entail Liberalism? Journal of Moral Philosophy 7 (3):303-320.
    Isaiah Berlin repeatedly attempted to derive liberalism from value pluralism. It is generally agreed that Berlin's arguments fail; however, neo-Berlinians have taken up the project of securing the entailment. This paper begins with an account of why the Berlinian project seems attractive to contemporary theorists. I then examine Berlin's argument. With this background in place, I argue that recent attempts by William Galston and George Crowder to rescue the Berlinian project do not succeed.
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  49. Robert B. Talisse (2010). Reply to Festenstein. Contemporary Political Theory 9 (1):45.
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  50. Robert B. Talisse (2010). Why I Am Not a Pluralist (Presidential Address). Southwest Philosophy Review 26 (1):5-15.
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