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  1. Robert W. Kentridge (2011). Attention Without Awareness. In Christopher Mole, Declan Smithies & Wayne Wu (eds.), Attention: Philosophical and Psychological Essays. Oxford University Press. 228.
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  2. Robert William Kentridge (2007). Incomplete Stimulus Representations and the Loss of Cognitive Access in Cerebral Achromatopsia. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (5-6):508-509.
    When processing of stimuli occurs without attention, phenomenal experience, as well as cognitive access, may be lost. Sensory representations are, however, constructed by neural machinery extending far beyond sensory receptors. In conditions such as cerebral achromatopsia incomplete sensory representations may still elicit phenomenal experience but these representations might be too aberrant to be integrated into the wider cognitive workspace.
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  3. Robert W. Kentridge, Charles A. Heywood & Lawrence Weiskrantz (2004). Spatial Attention Speeds Discrimination Without Awareness in Blindsight. Neuropsychologia 42 (6):831-835.
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  4. Charles A. Heywood, Robert W. Kentridge & Alan Cowey (2001). Colour and the Cortex: Wavelength Processing in Cortical Achromatopsia. In Beatrice De Gelder, Edward H. F. De Haan & Charles A. Heywood (eds.), Out of Mind: Varieties of Unconscious Processes. Oxford University Press. 52-68.
     
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  5. Robert W. Kentridge (2001). Computation, Chaos and Non-Deterministic Symbolic Computation: The Chinese Room Problem Solved? Psycoloquy 12 (50).
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  6. Robert W. Kentridge (2001). Why Do Stationary Visual Transients Apparently Fail to Elicit Phenomenal Vision After Unilateral Destruction of Primary Visual Cortex? Consciousness and Cognition 10 (4):588-590.
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  7. Robert W. Kentridge & Charles A. Heywood (2001). Attention and Alerting: Cognitive Processes Spared in Blindsight. In Beatrice De Gelder, Edward H. F. De Haan & Charles A. Heywood (eds.), Out of Mind: Varieties of Unconscious Processes. Oxford University Press. 163-181.
  8. Charles A. Heywood & Robert W. Kentridge (2000). Affective Blindsight? Trends in Cognitive Sciences 4 (4):125-126.
  9. Robert W. Kentridge & Charles A. Heywood (2000). Metacognition and Awareness. Consciousness And Cognition 9 (2):308-312.
    It is tempting to assume that metacognitive processes necessarily evoke awareness. We review a number of experiments in which cognitive schema have been shown to develop without awareness. Implicit learning of a novel schema may not involve metacognitive regulation per se. Substitution of one automatic process by another as a result of the inadequacy of the former as circumstances change does, however, clearly involve metacognitive and executive processes of error correction and schema selection. We describe a recently published study in (...)
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  10. Robert W. Kentridge & Charles A. Heywood (1999). The Status of Blindsight: Near-Threshold Vision, Islands of Cortex and the Riddoch Phenomenon. Journal of Consciousness Studies 6 (5):3-11.
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  11. Robert W. Kentridge, Charles A. Heywood & Lawrence Weiskrantz (1999). Attention Without Awareness in Blindsight. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London B 266:1805-11.
  12. Charles A. Heywood, Robert W. Kentridge & Alan Cowey (1998). Cortical Color Blindness is Not ''Blindsight for Color''. Consciousness and Cognition 7 (3):410-423.
    Cortical color blindness, or cerebral achromatopsia, has been likened by some authors to ''blindsight'' for color or an instance of ''covert'' processing of color. Recently, it has been shown that, although such patients are unable to identify or discriminate hue differences, they nevertheless show a striking ability to process wavelength differences, which can result in preserved sensitivity to chromatic contrast and motion in equiluminant displays. Moreover, visually evoked cortical potentials can still be elicited in response to chromatic stimuli. We suggest (...)
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  13. Robert W. Kentridge (1995). Symbols, Neurons, Soap-Bubbles and the Neural Computation Underlying Cognition. Minds and Machines 4 (4):439-449.
    A wide range of systems appear to perform computation: what common features do they share? I consider three examples, a digital computer, a neural network and an analogue route finding system based on soap-bubbles. The common feature of these systems is that they have autonomous dynamics — their states will change over time without additional external influence. We can take advantage of these dynamics if we understand them well enough to map a problem we want to solve onto them. Programming (...)
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  14. Robert W. Kentridge & John P. Aggleton (1990). Emotion: Sensory Representation, Reinforcement, and the Temporal Lobe. Cognition and Emotion 4 (3):191-208.