34 found
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  1. Robert W. Mitchell (1993). Mental Models of Mirror Self-Recognition: Two Theories. New Ideas in Psychology 11 (3):295-325.
     
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  2.  10
    Robert W. Mitchell & Crystal Curry (2016). Self-Recognition and Other-Recognition in Point-Light Displays. Open Journal of Philosophy 6 (1):42-50.
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  3.  21
    Robert W. Mitchell (1997). Kinesthetic-Visual Matching and the Self-Concept as Explanations of Mirror-Self-Recognition. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 27 (1):17–39.
    Since its inception as a topic of inquiry, mirror-self-recognition has usually been explained by two models: one, initiated by Guillaume, proposes that mirror-self-recognition depends upon kinesthetic-visual matching, and the other, initiated by Gallup, that self-recognition depends upon a self-concept. These two models are examined historically and conceptually. This examination suggests that the kinesthetic-visual matching model is conceptually coherent and makes reasonable and accurate predictions; and that the self-concept model is conceptually incoherent and makes inaccurate predictions from premises which are themselves (...)
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  4.  21
    Robert W. Mitchell (1997). A Comparison of the Self-Awareness and Kinesthetic-Visual Matching Theories of Self-Recognition: Autistic Children and Others. In James G. Snodgrass & R. Thompson (eds.), The Self Across Psychology: Self-Recognition, Self-Awareness, and the Self Concept. New York Academy of Sciences
  5.  10
    Robert W. Mitchell (1994). Are Motor Images Based on Kinestheticvisual Matching? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (2):214.
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  6.  11
    Robert W. Mitchell & Elizabeth Edmonson (1999). Functions of Repetitive Talk to Dogs During Play: Control, Conversation, or Planning? Society and Animals 7 (1):55-81.
    This study describes people's repetitive talk when playing with dogs and explores three hypotheses about that talk. Each of 23 people played with two dogs . Videorecorded participants spoke about 208 words per interaction. Of all words used, eight accounted for more than 50%. Phrases most frequently used and repeated were "come on" and "come here. " In decreasing order of frequency, sentences ranged from imperatives to attention-getting devices, declaratives about the dogs, and questions. Additional declaratives and talk for the (...)
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  7.  2
    Robert W. Mitchell (1988). Ontogeny, Biography, and Evidence for Tactical Deception. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (2):259.
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  8. Robert W. Mitchell (1993). Humans, Nonhumans and Personhood. In Peter Singer & Paola Cavalieri (eds.), The Great Ape Project. St. Martin's Griffin 237--247.
     
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  9. Robert W. Mitchell (1994). Multiplicities of Self. In S. T. Parker, R. Mitchell & M. L. Boccia (eds.), Self-Awareness in Animals and Humans: Developmental Perspectives. Cambridge University Press
  10.  6
    Robert W. Mitchell & Elizabeth Edmonson (1999). Functions of Repetitive Talk to Dogs During Play: Control, Conversation, or Planning? Society and Animals 7 (1):55-81.
    This study describes people's repetitive talk when playing with dogs and explores three hypotheses about that talk. Each of 23 people played with two dogs . Videorecorded participants spoke about 208 words per interaction. Of all words used, eight accounted for more than 50%. Phrases most frequently used and repeated were "come on" and "come here. " In decreasing order of frequency, sentences ranged from imperatives to attention-getting devices, declaratives about the dogs, and questions. Additional declaratives and talk for the (...)
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  11.  10
    Robert W. Mitchell & Alan L. Ellis (2013). Cat Person, Dog Person, Gay, or Heterosexual: The Effect of Labels on a Man’s Perceived Masculinity, Femininity, and Likability. Society and Animals 21 (1):1-16.
    American undergraduates rated masculinity, femininity, and likability of two men from a videotaped interaction. Participants were informed that both men were cat persons, dog persons, heterosexual, adopted, or gay, or were unlabeled. Participants rated the men less masculine when cat persons than when dog persons or unlabeled, and less masculine and more feminine when gay than when anything else or unlabeled. The more masculine man received lower feminine ratings when a dog person than when a heterosexual, and higher masculine ratings (...)
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  12.  9
    Robert W. Mitchell (2015). A Critique of Stephane Savanah’s “Mirror Self-Recognition and Symbol-Mindedness”. Biology and Philosophy 30 (1):137-144.
    Stephane Savanah provides a critique of theories of self-recognition that largely mirrors my own critique that I began publishing two decades ago. In addition, he both misconstrues my kinesthetic-visual matching model of mirror self-recognition in multiple ways , and misconstrues the evidence in the scientific literature on MSR. I describe points of agreement in our thinking about self-recognition, and criticize and rectify inaccuracies.
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  13.  4
    Robert W. Mitchell & Catherine A. Clement (1999). Simulations, Simulators, Amodality, and Abstract Terms. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (4):628-629.
    Barsalou's interesting model might benefit from defining simulation and clarifying the implications of prior critiques for simulations (and not just for perceptual symbols). Contrary to claims, simulators (or frames) appear, in the limit, to be amodal. In addition, the account of abstract terms seems extremely limited.
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  14.  2
    Robert W. Mitchell & H. Lyn Miles (1995). Apes and Language: Human Uniqueness Again? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (1):200.
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  15.  17
    Robert W. Mitchell & James R. Anderson (1998). Primate Theory of Mind is a Turing Test. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (1):127-128.
    Heyes's literature review of deception, imitation, and self-recognition is inadequate, misleading, and erroneous. The anaesthetic artifact hypothesis of self-recognition is unsupported by the data she herself examines. Her proposed experiment is tantalizing, indicating that theory of mind is simply a Turing test.
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  16.  2
    Robert W. Mitchell, Richard Sambrook & Rosanne Lorden (2012). Residents’ and Tourists’ Knowledge of Sea Lions in the Galápagos. Society and Animals 20 (4):342-363.
    This study examined knowledge of sea lions for both residents and tourists on San Cristóbal Island in the Galápagos, a famous nature tourism destination. Participants obtained through convenience and snowball sampling answered questionnaires about their knowledge of sea lions. Participants with higher education received higher overall scores, but participants’ education and age influenced answers on only a few questions. Residents and tourists obtained comparable overall scores, exhibiting extensive knowledge of sea lion behavior and life history. Whether participants were residents or (...)
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  17. Robert W. Mitchell (1997). Anthropomorphism and Anecdotes: A Guide for the Perplexed. In R. Mitchell, Nicholas S. Thompson & H. L. Miles (eds.), Anthropomorphism, Anecdotes, and Animals. Suny Press 407--427.
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  18.  5
    Robert W. Mitchell & Alan L. Ellis (2013). Cat Person, Dog Person, Gay, or Heterosexual: The Effect of Labels on a Man's Perceived Masculinity, Femininity, and Likability. Society and Animals 21 (1):1-16.
    American undergraduates rated masculinity, femininity, and likability of two men from a videotaped interaction. Participants were informed that both men were cat persons, dog persons, heterosexual, adopted, or gay, or were unlabeled. Participants rated the men less masculine when cat persons than when dog persons or unlabeled, and less masculine and more feminine when gay than when anything else or unlabeled. The more masculine man received lower feminine ratings when a dog person than when a heterosexual, and higher masculine ratings (...)
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  19.  4
    Rosanne Lorden, Richard Sambrook & Robert W. Mitchell (2012). Residents and Tourists Knowledge of Sea Lions in the Galapagos. Society and Animals 20 (4):342-363.
    This study examined knowledge of sea lions for both residents and tourists on San Cristóbal Island in the Galápagos, a famous nature tourism destination. Participants obtained through convenience and snowball sampling answered questionnaires about their knowledge of sea lions. Participants with higher education received higher overall scores, but participants’ education and age influenced answers on only a few questions. Residents and tourists obtained comparable overall scores, exhibiting extensive knowledge of sea lion behavior and life history. Whether participants were residents or (...)
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  20.  3
    Robert W. Mitchell (1993). Kinesthetic-Visual Matching, Perspective-Taking and Reflective Self-Awareness in Cultural Learning. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (3):530.
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  21.  7
    Robert W. Mitchell (1995). Evidence of Dolphin Self-Recognition and the Difficulties of Interpretation. Consciousness and Cognition 4 (2):229-234.
  22.  7
    Robert W. Mitchell (2009). Self-Awareness Without Inner Speech: A Commentary on Morin☆. Consciousness and Cognition 18 (2):532-534.
    Morin’s identification of inner speech with self-awareness is problematic. Taylor’s description of her experience before, during, and after her stroke and operation is also problematic; it is at times confusing and difficult to comprehend conceptually. Rather than being global, her deficits in self-awareness seem piecemeal. She describes self-awareness that exists independent of inner speech. I offer interpretations of her experience alternative to those of Morin and Taylor.
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  23.  1
    Robert W. Mitchell (1993). Pigeons as Communicators and Thinkers: Mon Oncle d'Amerique Deux? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (4):655.
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  24.  2
    H. Lyn Miles, Robert W. Mitchell & Stephen E. Harper (1996). Simon Says: The Development of Imitation in an Enculturated Orangutan. In A. Russon, Kim A. Bard & S. Parkers (eds.), Reaching Into Thought: The Minds of the Great Apes. Cambridge University Press 278--299.
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  25.  4
    Robert W. Mitchell (1998). Great Apes Imitate Actions of Others and Effects of Others' Actions. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (5):700-700.
    Apes imitate the effects of others' actions, but the evidence for program-level imitation seems contradictory and the evidence against bodily imitation and trial and error in learning the organization of complex activities seems ambiguous. Action-level imitations are more flexible than described and may derive from imitation of the effects of others' actions on objects.
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  26.  1
    Robert W. Mitchell (1996). Self-Knowledge, Knowledge of Other Minds, and Kinesthetic-Visual Matching. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (1):133.
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  27.  2
    Robert W. Mitchell (2004). Controlling the Dog, Pretending to Have a Conversation, or Just Being Friendly?: Influences of Sex and Familiarity on Americans’ Talk to Dogs During Play. Interaction Studiesinteraction Studies Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systems 5 (1):99-129.
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  28.  1
    Robert W. Mitchell & H. Lyn Miles (1993). Apes Have Mimetic Culture. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (4):768.
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  29.  1
    Robert W. Mitchell (2001). On Not Drawing the Line About Culture: Inconsistencies in Interpretation of Nonhuman Cultures. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (2):348-349.
    Defining culture as social learning means that culture is present in many birds and mammals, suggesting that cetacean culture is not so special and does not require special explanation. Contrary to their own claims, Rendell and Whitehead present culture as having variant forms in different species, and these forms seem inconsistently applied and compared across species.
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  30. Robert W. Mitchell (1997). Anthropomorphic Anecdotalism as Method. In R. Mitchell, Nicholas S. Thompson & H. L. Miles (eds.), Anthropomorphism, Anecdotes, and Animals. Suny Press 151--169.
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  31. Robert W. Mitchell (1999). Apes, Language, and the Human Mind, by Sue Savage-Rumbaugh, Stuart G. Shanker and Talbot J. Taylor. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 3 (6):243-243.
     
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  32. Robert W. Mitchell (2008). Minds: Other and Not-so-Other. Interaction Studies 9 (2):377-395.
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  33. Robert W. Mitchell (2008). Minds: Other and Not-so-Other. Interaction Studiesinteraction Studies Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systems 9 (2):377-396.
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  34. Robert W. Mitchell, Nicholas S. Thompson & H. Lyn Miles (1997). Taking Anthropomorphism and Anecdotes Seriously. In R. Mitchell, Nicholas S. Thompson & H. L. Miles (eds.), Anthropomorphism, Anecdotes, and Animals. Suny Press 3--11.
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