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  1. Lesley Kuhn, Robert Woog & Marcia Salner (2011). Utilizing Complexity for Epistemological Development. World Futures 67 (4-5):253 - 265.
    Complexity, in conceptualizing life as self-organizing, dynamic, and emergent, offers evocative metaphors for making sense that are not bound to linearity or certainty. We utilize complexity as a conceptual framework in teaching related to various aspects of the humanities and social sciences (business, organization, and management studies, ethics, social and political change, health, spirituality). In this article, we reflect on our use of complexity in addressing the teaching challenge inherent in encouraging complex epistemic cognition: thinking about thinking through a complexity (...)
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  2. Lesley Kuhn & Robert Woog (2007). From Complexity Concepts to Creative Applications. World Futures 63 (3 & 4):176 – 193.
    A complexity cosmography is introduced as construing a world that is self-organizing, dynamic, and emergent, and that comprises organic entities that too are self-organizing, dynamic, and emergent. Following critical reflection into the nature of utilising complexity in social inquiry, specific images, vocabularies and complexity-based methods and techniques as developed by the authors are introduced.
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  3. David Levick, Robert Woog & Kel Knox (2007). Trust and Goodwill as Attractors: Reflecting on a Complexity-Informed Inquiry. World Futures 63 (3 & 4):250 – 264.
    This article discusses a complexity-informed review and evaluation project. Complexity-informed methods and techniques are used to fashion understanding of the relationships and processes implicated between the service agencies constituting the Youth Accommodation Interagency - Nepean (YAIN) and their Resource Worker, the influence of these relationships and processes on the achievement of desired and required goals, and the potential for replication of these relationships and processes elsewhere. The article concludes with critical reflection regarding what was learnt from utilizing complexity in this (...)
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  4. Bruce Simmons, Robert Woog & Vladimir Dimitrov (2007). Living on the Edge: A Complexity-Informed Exploration of the Human-Water Relationship. World Futures 63 (3 & 4):275 – 285.
    Humanity and water represent an intersection of two natural cycles: the human economy and the earth's hydrological system. Although water is vital for human survival and growth, the point where human endeavor intersects is the most variable and uncertain in the hydrological system. Significant spatial and temporal variation of evaporation and rainfall has led to a number of responses aimed at increasing certainty of access to water. However, many of the world's civilizations can attest that the very act of reducing (...)
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