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  1. Roberta M. Berry, Lisa Bliss, Sylvia Caley, Paul A. Lombardo & Leslie E. Wolf (2013). Recent Developments in Health Care Law: Culture and Controversy. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 25 (1):1-24.
    This article reviews recent developments in health care law, focusing on controversy at the intersection of health care law and culture. The article addresses: emerging issues in federal regulatory oversight of the rapidly developing market in direct-to-consumer genetic testing, including questions about the role of government oversight and professional mediation of consumer choice; continuing controversies surrounding stem cell research and therapies and the implications of these controversies for healthcare institutions; a controversy in India arising at the intersection of abortion law (...)
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  2. Roberta M. Berry, Jason Borenstein & Robert J. Butera (2013). Contentious Problems in Bioscience and Biotechnology: A Pilot Study of an Approach to Ethics Education. Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (2):653-668.
    This manuscript describes a pilot study in ethics education employing a problem-based learning approach to the study of novel, complex, ethically fraught, unavoidably public, and unavoidably divisive policy problems, called “fractious problems,” in bioscience and biotechnology. Diverse graduate and professional students from four US institutions and disciplines spanning science, engineering, humanities, social science, law, and medicine analyzed fractious problems employing “navigational skills” tailored to the distinctive features of these problems. The students presented their results to policymakers, stakeholders, experts, and members (...)
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  3. Roberta M. Berry (2011). Teaching Health Law: Problem-Based Learning Regarding “Fractious Problems” in Health Law: Reflections on an Educational Experiment. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 39 (4):694-703.
  4. Roberta M. Berry (2010). A Polemic for Human Enhancement. Metascience 19 (2):263-266.
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  5. Roberta M. Berry (2009). Pt. 3. The Malleability of Human Nature. Reflections on Secular Foundationalism and Our Human Future / Stephen Erickson ; Nature as Second Nature : Plasticity and Habit / Peter Wake ; The Posthumanist Challenge to a Partly Naturalized Virtue Ethics. [REVIEW] In Mark J. Cherry (ed.), The Normativity of the Natural: Human Goods, Human Virtues, and Human Flourishing. Springer.
  6. Roberta M. Berry (2007). The Ethics of Genetic Engineering. Routledge.
    Genetic engineering: past and present as prelude to the future -- Utilitarianism and engineering to maximize welfare -- Deontology: engineering at the edges of disease, disability, difference, and death -- Virtue ethics and engineering for the virtues -- Genetic engineering, fractious problems, and a navigational approach to policymaking.
     
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  7. Roberta M. Berry (2006). Beyond Therapy Beyond the Beltway: An Opening Argument for a Public Debate on Enhancement Biotechnologies. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 18 (2):131-155.
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  8. Roberta M. Berry (2005). Informed Consent Law, Ethics, and Practice: From Infancy to Reflective Adolescence. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 17 (1):64-81.
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  9. Roberta M. Berry (2005). Three Stages in the Lifecycle of Bioethics: Observations on "Bioethics as Co-PI". American Journal of Bioethics 5 (6):30 – 32.
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  10. Roberta M. Berry (2003). Genetic Information and Research: Emerging Legal Issues. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 15 (1):70-99.
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  11. Arri Eisen & Roberta M. Berry (2002). The Absent Professor: Why We Don't Teach Research Ethics and What to Do About It. American Journal of Bioethics 2 (4):38 – 49.
    Research ethics education in the biosciences has not historically been a priority for research universities despite the fact that funding agencies, government regulators, and the parties involved in the research enterprise agree that it ought to be. The confluence of a number of factors, including scrutiny and regulation due to increased public awareness of the impact of basic research on society, increased public and private funding, increased diversity and collaboration among researchers, the impressive success and speed of research advances, and (...)
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