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  1.  67
    Robin Le Poidevin (2007). The Images of Time: An Essay on Temporal Representation. Oxford University Press.
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  2.  76
    Robin Le Poidevin (1997). Time and the Static Image: Robin Le Poidevin. Philosophy 72 (280):175-188.
    Photographs, paintings, rigid sculptures: all these provide examples of static images. It is true that they change—photographs fade, paintings darken and sculptures crumble—but what change they undergo is irrelevant to their representational content. A static image is one that represents by virtue of properties which remain largely unchanged throughout its existence. Because of this defining feature, according to a long tradition in aesthetics, a static image can only represent an instantaneous moment, or to be more exact the state of affairs (...)
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  3.  82
    Robin Le Poidevin, The Experience and Perception of Time. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  4. Robin Le Poidevin (2009). Identity and the Composite Christ: An Incarnational Dilemma: ROBIN LE POIDEVIN. Religious Studies 45 (2):167-186.
    One way of understanding the reduplicative formula ‘Christ is, qua God, omniscient, but qua man, limited in knowledge’ is to take the occurrences of the ‘ qua ’ locution as picking out different parts of Christ: a divine part and a human part. But this view of Christ as a composite being runs into paradox when combined with the orthodox understanding of the Incarnation, according to which Christ is identical to the second person of the Trinity. In response, we have (...)
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  5.  10
    Robin Le Poidevin (2016). The Two-Way Doomsday Machine. Think 15 (42):9-14.
    A thought experiment invites us to examine our intuitive beliefs about the reality of the past, the reality of the future, and our capacity to affect either, and provides a test of our attitudes towards life. Given an inescapable choice and extraordinary power, would it be our duty to destroy the whole of reality, both past and future?
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  6.  93
    Robin Le Poidevin (2003). Travels in Four Dimensions: The Enigmas of Space and Time. Oxford University Press.
    Space and time are the most fundamental features of our experience of the world, and yet they are also the most perplexing. Does time really flow, or is that simply an illusion? Did time have a beginning? What does it mean to say that time has a direction? Does space have boundaries, or is it infinite? Is change really possible? Could space and time exist in the absence of any objects or events? What, in the end, are space and time? (...)
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  7.  20
    Robin Le Poidevin (1991). Change, Cause, and Contradiction: A Defence of the Tenseless Theory of Time. St. Martin's Press.
  8.  39
    Robin Le Poidevin (2005). Missing Elements and Missing Premises: A Combinatorial Argument for the Ontological Reduction of Chemistry. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 56 (1):117-134.
    Does chemistry reduce to physics? If this means ‘Can we derive the laws of chemistry from the laws of physics?’, recent discussions suggest that the answer is ‘no’. But sup posing that kind of reduction—‘epistemological reduction’—to be impossible, the thesis of ontological reduction may still be true: that chemical properties are determined by more fundamental properties. However, even this thesis is threatened by some objections to the physicalist programme in the philosophy of mind, objections that generalize to the chemical case. (...)
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  9.  77
    Robin Le Poidevin (2004). Space, Supervenience and Substantivalism. Analysis 64 (3):191–198.
  10.  75
    Robin Le Poidevin (1996). Arguing for Atheism: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Religion. Routledge.
    Arguing for Atheism introduces a wide range of topics in the philosophy of religion and metaphysics. Robin Le Poidevin does not simply defend a denial of God's existence; he presents instead a way of intepreting religious discourse which allows us to make sense of the role of religion in our spiritual and moral lives. Ideal as a textbook for university courses in the philosophy of religion and metaphysics, Arguing for Atheism is also designed to be accessible, in its style and (...)
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  11.  99
    Robin le Poidevin (2004). A Puzzle Concerning Time Perception. Synthese 142 (1):109-142.
    According to a plausible and influential account of perceptual knowledge, the truth-makers of beliefs that constitute perceptual knowledge must feature in the causal explanation of how we acquire those beliefs. However, this account runs into difficulties when it tries to accommodate time perception -- specifically perception of order and duration -- since the features we are apparently tracking in such perception are not causal. The central aim of the paper is to solve this epistemological puzzle. Two strategies are examined. The (...)
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  12.  38
    Robin Le Poidevin (2005). The Cheshire Cat Problem and Other Spatial Obstacles to Backwards Time Travel. The Monist 88 (3):336--352.
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  13.  34
    Robin Le Poidevin (2013). Stopped Clocks, Silent Telephones and Sense Data: Some Problems of Time Perception. [REVIEW] Topoi 34 (1):1-8.
    When philosophers of perception contemplate concrete examples, the tendency is to choose perceptions whose content does not essentially involve time, but concern how things are at the moment they are perceived. This is true whether the cases are veridical (seeing a tree as a tree) or illusory (misperceiving the colour or spatial properties of an object). Less discussed, and arguably more complex and interesting cases do involve time as an essential element: perceiving movement, for example, or perceiving the order and (...)
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  14.  51
    Robin Le Poidevin (ed.) (1998). Questions of Time and Tense. Oxford University Press.
    This book brings together new essays on a major focus of debate in contemporary metaphysics: does time really pass, or is our ordinary experience of time as consisting of past, present, and future an illusion? The international contributors broaden this debate by demonstrating the importance of questions about the nature of time for philosophical issues in ethics, aesthetics, psychology, science, religion, and language.
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  15.  80
    Robin Le Poidevin (1999). Can Beliefs Be Caused by Their Truth-Makers? Analysis 59 (3):148–156.
  16.  79
    Robin Le Poidevin (1993). Lowe on Mctaggart. Mind 102 (405):163-170.
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  17.  85
    Robin Le Poidevin (2009). Incarnation: Metaphysical Issues. Philosophy Compass 4 (4):703-714.
    The last quarter of the twentieth century saw a resurgence of realism in various areas of philosophy, including metaphysics and the philosophy of religion, and this trend has continued in the first decade of the twenty-first century. In philosophy of religion this led to explorations of the philosophical coherence of orthodox doctrines, such as the Christian doctrines of the Trinity and the Incarnation. In metaphysics, there was renewed interest in debates concerning persistence, composition, the relation between mind and body, time (...)
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  18.  72
    Robin Le Poidevin (1988). Time and Truth in Fiction. British Journal of Aesthetics 28 (3):248-258.
  19.  55
    Robin Le Poidevin & D. H. Mellor (1987). Time, Change, and the `Indexical Fallacy'. Mind 96 (384):534-538.
    E. J. Lowe sets out in a recent paper1 to refute McTaggart's proof of the unreality of time, by exposing an ‘indexical fallacy’ in his disproof of the existence of tensed (i. e., A-series) facts.2 Lowe then develops an original account of what makes time the dimension of change, based on his own account of tensed facts. But in our opinion he fails on both counts: (1) he fails to refute McTaggart's perfectly sound disproof of tensed facts, which shows that (...)
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  20. Robin Le Poidevin & Murray MacBeath (eds.) (1993). The Philosophy of Time. Oxford University Press.
    This volume provides a balanced set of reviews which introduce the central topics in the philosophy of time. This is the first introductory anthology on the subject to appear for many years; the contributors are distinguished, and two of the essays are specially written for this collection. In their introduction, the editors summarize the background to the debate, and show the relevance of issues in the philosophy of time for other branches of philosophy and for science. Contributors include J.M.E. McTaggart, (...)
     
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  21.  52
    Robin le Poidevin (2009). Identity and the Composite Christ: An Incarnational Dilemma. Religious Studies 45 (2):167-186.
    One way of understanding the reduplicative formula "Christ is, ’qua’ God, omniscient, but ’qua’ man, limited in knowledge" is to take the occurrences of the ‘qua‘ locution as picking out different parts of Christ: a divine part and a human part. But this view of Christ as a composite being runs into paradox when combined with the orthodox understanding of the Incarnation, according to which Christ is identical to the second person of the Trinity. In response, we have to choose (...)
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  22. Robin Le Poidevin (2003). Travels in Four Dimensions: The Enigmas of Space and Time. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Does time really flow, or is that simply an illusion? Did time have a beginning? Does space have boundaries? Do space and time really exist? Robin Le Poidevin provides a clear, witty, and stimulating introduction to these deep questions, but also gives us the basis to think about these problems independently, avoiding large amounts of jargon and technicality. No prior knowledge of philosophy is required to enjoy this book. The universe might seem very different after reading it.
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  23.  52
    Robin Le Poidevin (1995). Worlds Within Worlds? The Paradoxes of Embedded Fiction. British Journal of Aesthetics 35 (3):227-238.
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  24.  46
    Robin le Poidevin (2011). The Incarnation: Divine Embodiment and the Divided Mind. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 68 (68):269-285.
    The central doctrine of traditional Christianity, the doctrine of the Incarnation, is that the Second Person of the Trinity lived a human existence on Earth as Jesus Christ for a finite period. In the words of the Nicene Creed, the Son is him who for us men, and for our salvation, came down from heaven, and was incarnate by the Holy Ghost of the Virgin Mary, and was made man.
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  25.  48
    Robin le Poidevin (2011). Euthyphro and the Goodness of God Incarnate. Ratio 24 (2):206-221.
    A familiar problem is here viewed from an unfamiliar angle. The familiar problem is the Euthyphro dilemma: if God wills something because it is good, then goodness is independent of God, so God becomes, morally speaking, de trop. On the other hand, if something is good because God wills it, then, given the absence of constraint on what God may will, moral truths are – counterintuitively – contingent. An examination of the kinds of necessity and possibility at work in this (...)
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  26.  35
    Robin le Poidevin (1996). The New Theory of Time. International Philosophical Quarterly 36 (1):111-112.
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  27.  32
    Robin Le Poidevin (2012). No Time Like the Present? The Philosophers' Magazine 57 (57):42-47.
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  28.  15
    Robin Le Poidevin (1999). David Cockburn, Other Times: Philosophical Perspectives on Past, Present and Future, Cambridge University Press, 1997, Pp. Xvi+ 355,£ 40.00. [REVIEW] Philosophical Investigations 22 (1).
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  29.  26
    Robin Le Poidevin (1994). The Chemistry of Space. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 72 (1):77 – 88.
  30.  33
    Robin Le Poidevin (1990). Relationism and Temporal Topology: Physics or Metaphysics? Philosophical Quarterly 40 (161):419-432.
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  31.  55
    Robin Le Poidevin (2002). Review: Rationality and Religion. [REVIEW] Mind 111 (441):185-188.
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  32.  20
    Robin le Poidevin (2000). Continuants and Continuity. The Monist 83 (3):381-398.
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  33.  14
    Robin Le Poidevin (1995). Autonomous Agents or God's Automata?: Human Freedom From the Divine Perspective. Cogito 9 (1):35-41.
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  34.  7
    Robin Le Poidevin (2000). Space and the Chiral Molecule. In Nalini Bhushan & Stuart Rosenfeld (eds.), Of Minds and Molecules: New Philosophical Perspectives on Chemistry. New York: Oxford University Press
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  35.  26
    Robin Le Poidevin (1996). Time, Tense and Topology. Philosophical Quarterly 46 (185):467-481.
  36. Robin Le Poidevin (2010). Time Without Change (in Three Steps). American Philosophical Quarterly 47 (2):171-180.
    Forty years after it first appeared, Sidney Shoemaker's much-read article, "Time without Change" , with its striking thought experiment, still dominates discussions of this intriguing topic. And rightly so: it is imaginative, subtle, and controversial. But times have changed, as they do, and in particular, the epistemological context in which Shoemaker was writing, overshadowed as it was by verificationism, no longer constrains our thinking as once it did. This is the age of bold and unashamedly realist metaphysical argument, in which (...)
     
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  37.  4
    Robin Le Poidevin (2003). Theistic discourse and fictional truth. Revue Internationale de Philosophie 3:271-284.
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  38.  4
    Robin Le Poidevin (1995). Time, Death and the Atheist. Cogito 9 (2):145-152.
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  39. Robin Le Poidevin (2011). Multiple Incarnations and Distributed Persons. In Anna Marmodoro & Jonathan Hill (eds.), The Metaphysics of the Incarnation. OUP Oxford
     
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  40.  11
    Robin Le Poidevin (2012). The Necessity of God and the Psychology of Counterfactual Thinking. In Yujin Nagasawa (ed.), Scientific Approaches to the Philosophy of Religion. Palgrave Macmillan
  41.  17
    Robin Le Poidevin (2013). Kenosis, Necessity and Incarnation. Heythrop Journal 54 (2):214-227.
    The doctrine of the Incarnation faces the following modal challenge: ‘The Son, as God, exists of necessity; Jesus, as man, exists only contingently. Therefore they cannot be one and the same.’ On the face it, the kenotic model, on which the Son gave up some of the divine properties at the Incarnation, cannot help to meet this challenge, since the suggestion that the Son gave up necessary existence implies that the necessity in question was only contingent, and this notion makes (...)
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  42.  18
    Robin Le Poidevin (1999). Egocentric and Objective Time. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 99 (1):19–36.
    The question is examined whether the distinction, familiar from other contexts, between egocentric and objective representations can be extended to time. A number of objections to the notion of an objective, or non-perspectival, representation of time are considered and criticised. It is argued, both that we can make sense of such a representation, and that it plays an important role in an understanding of memory. Finally, a connection is drawn between this issue and the debate over the tenseless theory of (...)
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  43.  2
    Robin Le Poidevin (1997). Relative Realities. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 28 (4):541-546.
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  44.  23
    Robin le Poidevin (2007). Action at a Distance. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 82 (61):21-36.
    In the broadest sense of the phrase, there is action at a distance whenever there is a spatial or temporal gap between a cause and its effect. In this sense, it is not at all controversial that there is action at a distance. To cite a few instances: the page a few inches in front of you is impinging on your senses; the Sun is now warming the Earth; we are still living with the consequences of the Second World War. (...)
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  45. Robin Le Poidevin & Murray MacBeath (eds.) (1993). The Philosophy of Time. Oxford University Press Uk.
    An up-to-date and accessible selection of some of the most important writings on the philosophy of time, including work by David Lewis, Michael Dummett, and Anthony Quinton.
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  46.  2
    Robin Le Poidevin (1995). Internal and External Questions About God: ROBIN LE POIDEVIN. Religious Studies 31 (4):485-500.
    Characteristic of metaphysics are general questions of existence, such as ‘Are there numbers?’ This kind of question is the target of Carnap's argument for deflationism, to the effect that general existential questions, if taken at face value, are meaningless. This paper considers deflationism in a theological context, and argues that the question ‘Does God exist?’ can appropriately be grouped with the ‘metaphysical’ questions attacked by Carnap. Deflationism thus has the surprising consequence that the correct approach to theism is that of (...)
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  47.  25
    Robin le Poidevin (2003). William Lane Craig Time and the Metaphysics of Relativity. (Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers, 2001). Pp. XI+279. £62.00 (Hbk). ISBN 0 7923 6668. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 39 (3):363-366.
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  48.  19
    Robin le Poidevin (1999). Recent Work on Time. Philosophical Books 40 (1):1--9.
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  49.  21
    Robin Le Poidevin (2004). Time and Space by Barry Dainton. Chesham: Acumen, 2001. Pp. XIV+386 Hardcover £45. Paperback £18.95. Philosophy 79 (3):486-490.
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  50. Robin Le Poidevin (ed.) (2002). Questions of Time and Tense. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Questions of Time and Tense aims to develop and broaden a central debate in contemporary metaphysics. This debate focuses on questions about the nature of time: does time really pass? That is, do events become present and then recede into the past? Or is our ordinary conception of time, as consisting of an ever-shifting past, present, and future, merely reflective of our perspective on the world? The editor gives an introductory guide to the debate, outlining the development of rival theories. (...)
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