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  1. Robin May Schott (2008). Just War and the Problem of Evil. Hypatia 23 (2):pp. 122-140.
    In this essay, Robin May Schott criticizes leading proponents of just war theory and introduces the notion of justifiable but illegitimate violence. Instead of legitimating some wars as just, it is better to acknowledge that both the situation of war and moral judgments about war are ambiguous. Schott raises the questions: What are alternative narratives of war? And what are alternative narratives to war? Such narratives are necessary for addressing the concepts of evil and of witnessing in the ethical discourse (...)
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  2. Robin May Schott (2004). The Atrocity Paradigm and the Concept of Forgiveness. Hypatia 19 (4):204 - 211.
    In this article I discuss Claudia Card's treatment of war rape in relation to her discussion of the victim's moral power of forgiveness. I argue that her analysis of the victim's power to withhold forgiveness overlooks the paradoxical structure of witnessing, which implies that there is an ungraspable dimension of atrocity. In relation to this ungraspable element, the proposal that victims of atrocity have the power to either offer or withhold forgiveness may have little relevance.
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  3. Robin May Schott (2003). Introduction to Feminist Philosophy and the Problem of Evil, Part II. Hypatia 18 (2):152-154.
  4. Todd Calder, Claudia Card, Ann Cudd, Eric Kraemer, Alice MacLachlan, Sarah Clark Miller, María Pía Lara, Robin May Schott, Laurence Thomas & Lynne Tirrell (2009). Evil, Political Violence, and Forgiveness: Essays in Honor of Claudia Card. Lexington Books.
    Rather than focusing on political and legal debates surrounding attempts to determine if and when genocidal rape has taken place in a particular setting, this essay turns instead to a crucial, yet neglected area of inquiry: the moral significance of genocidal rape, and more specifically, the nature of the harms that constitute the culpable wrongdoing that genocidal rape represents. In contrast to standard philosophical accounts, which tend to employ an individualistic framework, this essay offers a situated understanding of harm that (...)
     
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  5. Robin May Schott (1988). Cognition and Eros: A Critique of the Kantian Paradigm. Pennsylvania State University Press.
    In the dissertation I examine the split between cognition and eros in Kant's notion of objectivity, which has become paradigmatic for modern theories about knowledge. I argue that the split between cognition, on the one hand, and feelings and desires, on the other, does not capture the necessary conditions of knowledge, as Kant claims, but involves a suppression of erotic factors of existence. ;The split between pure knowledge and sensual existence in Kant's thought reflects an ascetic tradition inherited from both (...)
     
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  6.  3
    Robin May Schott (2003). 11 Beauvoir on the Ambiguity of Evil. In Claudia Card (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Simone de Beauvoir. Cambridge University Press 228.
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  7. Robin May Schott (2003). Discovering Feminist Philosophy: Knowledge, Ethics, Politics. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Discovering Feminist Philosophy provides an accessible introduction to the central issues in feminist philosophy. At the same time, it answers current objections to feminism, arguing that in today's world it is as compelling as ever to probe the impact of the dualism of the sexes. This unique book is equal parts survey, viewpoint, and scholarship—ideal for anyone seeking to understand the current and future role of feminist philosophy.
     
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  8.  1
    Robin May Schott (ed.) (2010). Birth, Death, and Femininity: Philosophies of Embodiment. Indiana University Press.
    Issues surrounding birth and death have been fundamental for Western philosophy as well as for individual existence. The contributors to this volume unravel the gendered aspects of the classical philosophical discourses on death, bringing in discussions about birth, creativity, and the entire chain of human activity. By linking their work to major thinkers such as Heidegger, Nietzsche, Beauvoir, and Arendt, and to major philosophical currents such as ancient philosophy, existentialism, phenomenology, and social and political philosophy, they challenge prevailing feminist articulations (...)
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  9.  3
    Robin May Schott (2003). Introduction to Feminist Philosophy and the Problem of Evil, Part II. Hypatia 18 (2):152-154.
  10.  30
    Robin May Schott (2003). Introduction: Special Issue on "Feminist Philosophy and the Problem of Evil". Hypatia 18 (1):1-9.
  11.  6
    Robin May Schott (1989). Social and Religions Antecedents of Ascetic Greek Philosopy. Social Philosophy Today 2:385-400.
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  12.  9
    Robin May Schott (1996). Gender and "Postmodern War". Hypatia 11 (4):19 - 29.
    In this essay I argue that war is not "above" gender analyses. I question in particular whether the concept of "postmodern war" is adequate to explain the intersections of gender with ethnicity and nationality, which underlie the sexual violence against women in wartime. The poststructuralist concept of the "fluidity" of the category of gender needs to be modified by an analysis of how "non-fluid" configurations of gender are entrenched in material conditions of existence.
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  13.  2
    Robin May Schott (1996). Gender and “Postmodern War”. Hypatia 11 (4):19-29.
  14.  2
    Robin May Schott (2003). Introduction: Special Issue on "Feminist Philosophy and the Problem of Evil". Hypatia 18 (1):1-9.
  15.  2
    Robin May Schott (2003). Introduction: Special Issue on “Feminist Philosophy and the Problem of Evil”. Hypatia 18 (1):1-9.
  16.  2
    Robin May Schott (2008). Just War and the Problem of Evil. Hypatia 23 (2):122-140.
  17.  7
    Robin May Schott (2003). Evil in Modern Thought: An Alternative History of Philosophy (Review). Hypatia 18 (2):222-226.
  18.  5
    Robin May Schott (1999). Review: Battersby, The Phenomenal Women: Feminist Metaphysics and the Patterns of Identity. [REVIEW] Kantian Review 3 (1):131-137.
  19.  9
    Robin May Schott (2012). Neither Victim nor Survivor: Thinking Toward a New Humanity. By Marilyn Nissim-Sabat. Lanham, Md.: Lexington Books, 2009; Andtheorizing Sexual Violence. Edited by Renée J. Heberle and Victoria Grace. New York and London: Routledge, 2009. [REVIEW] Hypatia 27 (3):929-935.
  20.  9
    Robin May Schott (2003). Book Review: Susan Neiman. Evil in Modern Thought: An Alternative History of Philosophy. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2002. [REVIEW] Hypatia 18 (2):222-226.
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  21.  3
    Robin May Schott (1999). Yielding Gender: Feminism, Deconstruction, and the History of Philosophy (Review). Hypatia 14 (3):157-162.
  22.  2
    Robin May Schott (1997). Maternal Bodies and Nationalisms. Philosophy Today 41 (4):104-109.
  23.  4
    Robin May Schott (1999). Book Review: Penelope Deutscher. Yielding Gender: Feminism, Deconstruction and the History of Philosophy. London and New York: Routledge, 1997. [REVIEW] Hypatia 14 (3):157-162.
  24. Gary E. Aylesworth, Bettina Bergo, Thomas P. Brockelman, Alina Clej, Damian Ward Hey, Drew A. Hyland, Basil O'Neill, Henk Oosterling, Stephen David Ross, Katherine Rudolph, Robin May Schott, Massimo Verdicchio, James R. Watson & Martin G. Weiss (2014). Subjects and Simulations: Between Baudrillard and Lacoue-Labarthe. Lexington Books.
    Subjects and Simulations presents essays focused on suffering and sublimity, representation and subjectivity, and the relation of truth and appearance through engagement with the legacies of Jean Baudrillard and Philippe Lacoue-Labarthe.
     
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  25. Robin May Schott (2005). Boganmeldelse af Cecilia Sjöholm, The Antigone Complex. SATS: Northern European Journal of Philosophy 6 (2).
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  26. Robin May Schott (ed.) (2010). Birth, Death, and Femininity: Philosophies of Embodiment. Indiana University Press.
    Issues surrounding birth and death have been fundamental for Western philosophy as well as for individual existence. The contributors to this volume unravel the gendered aspects of the classical philosophical discourses on death, bringing in discussions about birth, creativity, and the entire chain of human activity. By linking their work to major thinkers such as Heidegger, Nietzsche, Beauvoir, and Arendt, and to major philosophical currents such as ancient philosophy, existentialism, phenomenology, and social and political philosophy, they challenge prevailing feminist articulations (...)
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  27. Robin May Schott (1999). Book Review: Penelope Deutscher. Yielding Gender: Feminism, Deconstruction and the History of Philosophy. London and New York: Routledge, 1997. [REVIEW] Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy 14 (3):157-162.
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  28. Robin May Schott (2003). Book Review: Susan Neiman. Evil in Modern Thought: An Alternative History of Philosophy. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2002. [REVIEW] Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy 18 (2):222-226.
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  29. Robin May Schott (2005). Cecilia Sjöholm, The Antigone Complex, Stanford University Press, Stanford, 2004, Pp. 240. SATS 6 (2).
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  30. Robin May Schott (2007). Feminism and the History of Philosophy. In Linda Alcoff & Eva Feder Kittay (eds.), The Blackwell Guide to Feminist Philosophy. Blackwell Pub.
  31. Robin May Schott (2003). Introduction: Special Issue On?Feminist Philosophy and the Problem of Evil? Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy 18 (1):1-9.
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  32. Robin May Schott (1997). Maternal Bodies and Nationalism. Philosophy Today 41 (9999):104-109.
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  33.  4
    Robin May Schott & Kirsten Klercke (eds.) (2007). Philosophy on the Border. Gazelle Drake Academic [Distributor].
    This anthology is inspired by the conviction that the big questions of human existence, including matters of love and hate, responsibility and war, matter to us ...
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  34. Robin May Schott (2004). The Atrocity Paradigm and the Concept of Forgiveness. Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy 19 (4):202-209.
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