Search results for 'Roblin R. Meeks' (try it on Scholar)

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Profile: Roblin Meeks (City University of New York)
  1. Roblin R. Meeks (2004). Unintentionally Biasing the Data: Reply to Knobe. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 24 (2):220-223.score: 870.0
    Knobe wants to help adjudicate the philosophical debate concerning whether and under what conditions we normally judge that some side effect was brought about intentionally. His proposal for doing so is perhaps an obvious one--simply elicit the intuitions of "The Folk" directly on the matter and record the results. Knobe concludes that people's judgment that a side effect was brought about intentionally apparently rests, at least in part, upon how blameworthy they find the agent responsible for it. Knobe's appreciably straightforward (...)
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  2. Joshua Knobe, Dingmar Van Eck, Susan Blackmore, Henk Bij De Weg, John Barresi, Roblin Meeks, Julian Kiverstein & Drew Rendall (2005). Reviews. [REVIEW] Philosophical Psychology 18 (6):785 – 817.score: 240.0
  3. Charles Landesman & Roblin Meeks (eds.) (2003). Philosophical Skepticism. Blackwell Pub..score: 240.0
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  4. R. Meeks (2006). Why Nonconceptual Content Cannot Be Immune to Error Through Misidentification. European Review of Philosophy 6:81-100.score: 240.0
  5. Roblin Meeks, Awareness of the Body "From the Inside": Identification, Ownership, and Error.score: 240.0
     
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  6. Roblin Meeks (1995). Book Review: Stanley Cavell: Philosophy's Recounting of the Ordinary. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Literature 19 (2):407-408.score: 240.0
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  7. Roblin Roy Meeks (2003). Identifying the First Person. Dissertation, City University of New Yorkscore: 240.0
    Wide agreement exists that self-ascriptions that one would express with the first-person pronoun differ in kind from those one would express with other self-designating expressions such as proper names and definite descriptions. At least some first-person self-ascriptions, many argue, are nonaccidental---that is, they involve no self-identification, and hence in making them one cannot accidentally misidentify the subject of the ascription. I examine the support for this claim throughout the literature, paying particular attention to Sydney Shoemaker's proposal that self-ascriptions are nonaccidental (...)
     
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  8. Lori R. Meeks (2007). In Her Likeness. Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 34 (2):351-392.score: 240.0
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  9. In Her Likeness (2007). Lori R. Meeks. Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 34 (2):351-392.score: 140.0
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  10. Jose Luis Bermudez (2000). The Cognitive Neuroscience of Primitive Self-Consciousness. Psycoloquy 11 (35).score: 87.0
    Myin, Erik (2000) Direct Self-Consciousness (2)Bermúdez, José Luis (2000) Concepts and the Priority Principle (10)Bermúdez, José Luis (2000) Circularity, "I"-Thoughts and the Linguistic Requirement for Concept Possession (11)Meeks, Roblin R. (2000) Withholding Immunity: Misidentification, Misrepresentation, and Autonomous Nonconceptual Proprioceptive First-Person Content (12)Newen, Albert (2001) Kinds of Self-Consciousness (13)Bermudez, Jose Luis (2000) Direct Self-Consciousness (4)Bermudez, Jose Luis (2000) Prelinguistic Self-Consciousness (5)Gallese, Vittorio (2000) The Brain and the Self: Reviewing the Neuroscientific Evidence (6)Bermudez, Jose Luis (2000) The Cognitive Neuroscience of (...)
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  11. Leslie R. Meek, Teresa M. Dalager & Ernest D. Kemble (1989). Effects of Dominance Status on Defensive Burying in Male Mice. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 27 (4):348-350.score: 8.0
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  12. Leslie R. Meek & Ernest D. Kemble (1990). Effects of Eltoprazine Hydrochloride (DU 28853) on Maternal Behavior in Mice. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 28 (6):563-564.score: 8.0