Search results for 'Robotics' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Kantian Robotics (2007). Chapter Nine Kantian Robotics: Building a Robot to Understand Kant's Transcendental Turn Lawrence M. Hinman. In Soraj Hongladarom (ed.), Computing and Philosophy in Asia. Cambridge Scholars Pub. 135.
     
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  2. Marco Mirolli (2011). Towards a Vygotskyan Cognitive Robotics: The Role of Language as a Cognitive Tool. New Ideas in Psychology 29:298-311.
    Cognitive Robotics can be defined as the study of cognitive phenomena by their modeling in physical artifacts such as robots. This is a very lively and fascinating field which has already given fundamental contributions to our understanding of natural cognition. Nonetheless, robotics has to date addressed mainly very basic, low­level cognitive phenomena like sensory­motor coordination, perception, and navigation, and it is not clear how the current approach might scale up to explain high­level human cognition. In this paper we (...)
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  3.  53
    Hutan Ashrafian (2015). AIonAI: A Humanitarian Law of Artificial Intelligence and Robotics. Science and Engineering Ethics 21 (1):29-40.
    The enduring progression of artificial intelligence and cybernetics offers an ever-closer possibility of rational and sentient robots. The ethics and morals deriving from this technological prospect have been considered in the philosophy of artificial intelligence, the design of automatons with roboethics and the contemplation of machine ethics through the concept of artificial moral agents. Across these categories, the robotics laws first proposed by Isaac Asimov in the twentieth century remain well-recognised and esteemed due to their specification of preventing human (...)
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  4.  9
    Guglielmo Tamburrini & Edoardo Datteri (2005). Machine Experiments and Theoretical Modelling: From Cybernetic Methodology to Neuro-Robotics. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 15 (3-4):335-358.
    Cybernetics promoted machine-supported investigations of adaptive sensorimotor behaviours observed in biological systems. This methodological approach receives renewed attention in contemporary robotics, cognitive ethology, and the cognitive neurosciences. Its distinctive features concern machine experiments, and their role in testing behavioural models and explanations flowing from them. Cybernetic explanations of behavioural events, regularities, and capacities rely on multiply realizable mechanism schemata, and strike a sensible balance between causal and unifying constraints. The multiple realizability of cybernetic mechanism schemata paves the way to (...)
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  5.  19
    Robert M. Geraci (2011). Martial Bliss: War and Peace in Popular Science Robotics. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Technology 24 (3):339-354.
    In considering how to best deploy robotic systems in public and private sectors, we must consider what individuals will expect from the robots with which they interact. Public awareness of robotics—as both military machines and domestic helpers—emerges out of a braided stream composed of science fiction and popular science. These two genres influence news media, government and corporate spending, and public expectations. In the Euro-American West, both science fiction and popular science are ambivalent about the military applications for (...), and thus we can expect their readers to fear the dangers posed by advanced robotics while still eagerly anticipating the benefits to be accrued through them. The chief pop science authors in robotics and artificial intelligence have a decidedly apocalyptic bent and have thus been described as leaders in a social movement called "Apocalyptic AI." In one form or another, such authors look forward to a transcendent future in which machine life succeeds human life, thanks to the march of evolutionary progress. The apocalyptic promises of popular robotics presume that presently exponential growth in computing will continue indefinitely, producing a "Singularity." During the Singularity, technological progress will be so rapid that undreamt of changes will take place on earth, the most important of which will be the evolutionary succession of human beings by massively intelligent robots and the "uploading" of human consciousness into computer bodies. This supposedly inevitable transition into post-biological life looms across the entire scope of pop robotics and artificial intelligence (AI), and it is from beneath that shadow that all popular books engage the military and the ethics of warfare. Creating a just future will require that we transcend the apocalyptic discourse of pop science and establish an ethical approach to researching and deploying robots, one that emphasizes human rather than robot welfare; doing so will require the collaboration of social scientists, humanists, and scientists. (shrink)
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  6.  24
    Tom Ziemke (2001). The Construction of 'Reality' in the Robot: Constructivist Perspectives on Situated Artificial Intelligence and Adaptive Robotics. [REVIEW] Foundations of Science 6 (1-3):163-233.
    This paper discusses different approaches incognitive science and artificial intelligenceresearch from the perspective of radicalconstructivism, addressing especially theirrelation to the biologically based theories ofvon Uexküll, Piaget as well as Maturana andVarela. In particular recent work in New AI and adaptive robotics on situated and embodiedintelligence is examined, and we discuss indetail the role of constructive processes asthe basis of situatedness in both robots andliving organisms.
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  7.  40
    Mark Coeckelbergh (2011). From Killer Machines to Doctrines and Swarms, or Why Ethics of Military Robotics Is Not (Necessarily) About Robots. Philosophy and Technology 24 (3):269-278.
    Ethical reflections on military robotics can be enriched by a better understanding of the nature and role of these technologies and by putting robotics into context in various ways. Discussing a range of ethical questions, this paper challenges the prevalent assumptions that military robotics is about military technology as a mere means to an end, about single killer machines, and about “military” developments. It recommends that ethics of robotics attend to how military technology changes our (...)
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  8.  33
    Edoardo Datteri (2013). Predicting the Long-Term Effects of Human-Robot Interaction: A Reflection on Responsibility in Medical Robotics. [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (1):139-160.
    This article addresses prospective and retrospective responsibility issues connected with medical robotics. It will be suggested that extant conceptual and legal frameworks are sufficient to address and properly settle most retrospective responsibility problems arising in connection with injuries caused by robot behaviours (which will be exemplified here by reference to harms occurred in surgical interventions supported by the Da Vinci robot, reported in the scientific literature and in the press). In addition, it will be pointed out that many prospective (...)
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  9.  27
    Porfirio Silva & Pedro U. Lima (2007). Institutional Robotics. In F. Almeida e Costa et al (ed.), Advances in Artificial Life. ECAL 2007. Springer-Verlag
    Pioneer approaches to Artificial Intelligence have traditionally neglected, in a chronological sequence, the agent body, the world where the agent is situated, and the other agents. With the advent of Collective Robotics approaches, important progresses were made toward embodying and situating the agents, together with the introduction of collective intelligence. However, the currently used models of social environments are still rather poor, jeopardizing the attempts of developing truly intelligent robot teams. In this paper, we propose a roadmap for a (...)
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  10.  13
    Simon Penny (2013). Art and Robotics: Sixty Years of Situated Machines. [REVIEW] AI and Society 28 (2):147-156.
    This paper pursues the intertwined tracks of robotics and art since the mid 20th century, taking a loose chronological approach that considers both the devices themselves and their discursive contexts. Relevant research has occurred in a variety of cultural locations, often outside of or prior to formalized robotics contexts. Research was even conducted under the aegis of art or cultural practices where robotics has been pursued for other than instrumental purposes. In hindsight, some of that work seems (...)
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  11.  14
    Philip Husbands, Andrew Philippides, Patricia Vargas, Christopher L. Buckley, Peter Fine, Ezequiel Di Paolo & Michael O'Shea (2010). Spatial, Temporal, and Modulatory Factors Affecting GasNet Evolvability in a Visually Guided Robotics Task. Complexity 16 (2):35-44.
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  12.  57
    Ronald L. Chrisley (1994). Taking Embodiment Seriously: Nonconceptual Content and Robotics. In Kenneth M. Ford, C. Glymour & Patrick Hayes (eds.), Android Epistemology. MIT Press
    The development and deployment of the notion of pre-objective or nonconceptual content for the purposes of intentional explanation of requires assistance from a practical and theoretical understanding of computational/robotic systems acting in real-time and real-space. In particular, the usual "that"-clause specification of content will not work for non-conceptual contents; some other means of specification is required, means that make use of the fact that contents are aspects of embodied and embedded systems. That is, the specification of non-conceptual content should use (...)
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  13.  12
    Frank Broz, Chrystopher L. Nehaniv, Tony Belpaeme, Ambra Bisio, Kerstin Dautenhahn, Luciano Fadiga, Tomassino Ferrauto, Kerstin Fischer, Frank Förster, Onofrio Gigliotta, Sascha Griffiths, Hagen Lehmann, Katrin S. Lohan, Caroline Lyon, Davide Marocco, Gianluca Massera, Giorgio Metta, Vishwanathan Mohan, Anthony Morse, Stefano Nolfi, Francesco Nori, Martin Peniak, Karola Pitsch, Katharina J. Rohlfing, Gerhard Sagerer, Yo Sato, Joe Saunders, Lars Schillingmann, Alessandra Sciutti, Vadim Tikhanoff, Britta Wrede, Arne Zeschel & Angelo Cangelosi (2014). The ITALK Project: A Developmental Robotics Approach to the Study of Individual, Social, and Linguistic Learning. Topics in Cognitive Science 6 (3):534-544.
    This article presents results from a multidisciplinary research project on the integration and transfer of language knowledge into robots as an empirical paradigm for the study of language development in both humans and humanoid robots. Within the framework of human linguistic and cognitive development, we focus on how three central types of learning interact and co-develop: individual learning about one's own embodiment and the environment, social learning (learning from others), and learning of linguistic capability. Our primary concern is how these (...)
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  14.  24
    Jun Tani (2004). The Dynamical Systems Accounts for Phenomenology of Immanent Time: An Interpretation by Revisiting a Robotics Synthetic Study. Journal of Consciousness Studies 11 (9):5-24.
    This paper discusses possible correspondences between the dynamical systems characteristics observed in our previously proposed cognitive model and phenomenological accounts of immanent time considered by Edmund Husserl. Our simulation experiments in the anticiparatory learning of a robot showed that encountering sensory-motor flow can be learned as segmented into chunks of reusable primitives with accompanying dynamic shifting between coherences and incoherences in local modules. It is considered that the sense of objective time might appear when the continuous sensory-motor flow input to (...)
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  15. Erica Palmerini, Federico Azzarri, Fiorella Battaglia, Andrea Bertolini, Antonio Carnevale, Jacopo Carpaneto, Filippo Cavallo, Angela Di Carlo, Marco Cempini, Marco Controzzi, Bert-Jaap Koops, Federica Lucivero, Nikil Mukerji, Luca Nocco, Alberto Pirni & Huma Shah (2014). Guidelines on Regulating Robotics. Robolaw (FP7 Project).
  16. Domenico Parisi (2007). Mental Robotics. In Antonio Chella & Riccardo Manzotti (eds.), Artificial Consciousness. Imprint Academic 191-211.
     
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  17. Andy Clark & Rick Grush (1999). Towards a Cognitive Robotics. Adaptive Behavior 7 (1):5-16.
    There is a definite challenge in the air regarding the pivotal notion of internal representation. This challenge is explicit in, e.g., van Gelder, 1995; Beer, 1995; Thelen & Smith, 1994; Wheeler, 1994; and elsewhere. We think it is a challenge that can be met and that (importantly) can be met by arguing from within a general framework that accepts many of the basic premises of the work (in new robotics and in dynamical systems theory) that motivates such scepticism in (...)
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  18.  31
    Rodney A. Brooks, New Approaches to Robotics.
    In order to build autonomous robots that can carry out useful work in unstructured environments new approaches have been developed to building intelligent systems. The relationship to traditional academic robotics and traditional artificial intelligence is examined. In the new approaches a tight coupling of sensing to action produces architectures for intelligence that are networks of simple computational elements which are quite broad, but not very deep. Recent work within this approach has demonstrated the use of representations, expectations, plans, goals, (...)
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  19.  11
    Robert Geraci (2010). Apocalyptic Ai: Visions of Heaven in Robotics, Artificial Intelligence, and Virtual Reality. OUP Usa.
    Apocalyptic AI, the hope that we might one day upload our minds into machines and live forever in cyberspace, has become commonplace. This view now affects robotics and AI funding, play in online games, and philosophical and theological conversations about morality and human dignity.
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  20. Susan Leigh Anderson (2008). Asimov's “Three Laws of Robotics” and Machine Metaethics. AI and Society 22 (4):477-493.
    Using Asimov’s “Bicentennial Man” as a springboard, a number of metaethical issues concerning the emerging field of machine ethics are discussed. Although the ultimate goal of machine ethics is to create autonomous ethical machines, this presents a number of challenges. A good way to begin the task of making ethics computable is to create a program that enables a machine to act an ethical advisor to human beings. This project, unlike creating an autonomous ethical machine, will not require that we (...)
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  21. Michael Wheeler (2008). Cognition in Context: Phenomenology, Situated Robotics and the Frame Problem. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 16 (3):323 – 349.
    The frame problem is the difficulty of explaining how non-magical systems think and act in ways that are adaptively sensitive to context-dependent relevance. Influenced centrally by Heideggerian phenomenology, Hubert Dreyfus has argued that the frame problem is, in part, a consequence of the assumption (made by mainstream cognitive science and artificial intelligence) that intelligent behaviour is representation-guided behaviour. Dreyfus' Heideggerian analysis suggests that the frame problem dissolves if we reject representationalism about intelligence and recognize that human agents realize the property (...)
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  22.  5
    Michael Nagenborg, Rafael Capurro, Jutta Weber & Christoph Pingel (2008). Ethical Regulations on Robotics in Europe. AI and Society 22 (3):349-366.
    There are only a few ethical regulations that deal explicitly with robots, in contrast to a vast number of regulations, which may be applied. We will focus on ethical issues with regard to “responsibility and autonomous robots”, “machines as a replacement for humans”, and “tele-presence”. Furthermore we will examine examples from special fields of application (medicine and healthcare, armed forces, and entertainment). We do not claim to present a complete list of ethical issue nor of regulations in the field of (...)
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  23.  9
    Brian R. Duffy (2006). Fundamental Issues in Social Robotics. International Review of Information Ethics 6 (12):2006.
    Man and machine are rife with fundamental differences. Formal research in artificial intelligence and robotics has for half a century aimed to cross this divide, whether from the perspective of understanding man by building models, or building machines which could be as intelligent and versatile as humans. Inevitably, our sources of inspiration come from what exists around us, but to what extent should a machine's conception be sourced from such biological references as ourselves? Machines designed to be capable of (...)
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  24.  23
    Lee McCauley (2007). AI Armageddon and the Three Laws of Robotics. Ethics and Information Technology 9 (2):153-164.
    After 50 years, the fields of artificial intelligence and robotics capture the imagination of the general public while, at the same time, engendering a great deal of fear and skepticism. Isaac Asimov recognized this deep-seated misconception of technology and created the Three Laws of Robotics. The first part of this paper examines the underlying fear of intelligent robots, revisits Asimov’s response, and reports on some current opinions on the use of the Three Laws by practitioners. Finally, an argument (...)
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  25.  57
    Maria Bittner (2006). Ontology for Human Talk and Thought (Not Robotics). Theoretical Linguistics 32 (1):47-56.
    Hamm, Kamp, and van Lambalgen 2006 (hereafter HLK) propose to relate NL discourse to cognitive representations that also deal with world knowledge, planning, belief revision, etc. Surprisingly, to represent human cognition they use an event calculus "which has found applications in robotics". This comment argues that the robotics-based theory of HLK attributes too much to world knowledge and not enough to the ontology, centering, and other universals of NL semantics. It is also too Anglo-centric to generalize to languages (...)
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  26.  5
    Willem F. G. Haselager (2005). Robotics, Philosophy and the Problems of Autonomy. Pragmatics and Cognition 13 (3):515-532.
    Robotics can be seen as a cognitive technology, assisting us in understanding various aspects of autonomy. In this paper I will investigate a difference between the interpretations of autonomy that exist within robotics and philosophy. Based on a brief review of some historical developments I suggest that within robotics a technical interpretation of autonomy arose, related to the independent performance of tasks. This interpretation is far removed from philosophical analyses of autonomy focusing on the capacity to choose (...)
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  27.  23
    Ugo Pagallo (2011). Killers, Fridges, and Slaves: A Legal Journey in Robotics. [REVIEW] AI and Society 26 (4):347-354.
    This paper adopts a legal perspective to counter some exaggerations of today’s debate on the social understanding of robotics. According to a long and well-established tradition, there is in fact a relative strong consensus among lawyers about some key notions as, say, agency and liability in the current use of robots. However, dealing with a field in rapid evolution, we need to rethink some basic tenets of the contemporary legal framework. In particular, time has come for lawyers to acknowledge (...)
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  28.  14
    Raya A. Jones (2013). Relationalism Through Social Robotics. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 43 (4):405-424.
    Social robotics is a rapidly developing industry-oriented area of research, intent on making robots in social roles commonplace in the near future. This has led to rising interest in the dynamics as well as ethics of human-robot relationships, described here as a nascent relational turn. A contrast is drawn with the 1990s’ paradigm shift associated with relational-self themes in social psychology. Constructions of the human-robot relationship reproduce the “I-You-Me” dominant model of theorising about the self with biases that (as (...)
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  29.  8
    Thomas Dreier & Indra Spiecker Genannt Döhmann (2012). Legal Aspects of Service Robotics. Poiesis and Praxis 9 (3-4):201-217.
    The emergent use of service robots in more and more areas of social life raises a number of legal issues which have to be addressed in order to apply and adapt the existing legal framework to this new technology. The article provides an overview of law as a means to regulate and govern technology and discusses fundamental issues of the relationship between law and technology. It then goes on to address a number of relevant problems in the field of service (...)
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  30.  6
    J. Tani (2008). Objectifying the Subjective Self: An Account From a Synthetic Robotics Approach. Constructivist Foundations 4 (1):28-30.
    Open peer commentary on the target article “How and Why the Brain Lays the Foundations for a Conscious Self” by Martin V. Butz. Excerpt: Being impressed by Butz’s psychological account for the process of objectification of the subjective self, I would like to postulate, from my expertise in synthetic neuro-robotics studies, possible neuro-dynamic mechanisms that account for his psychological theorem.
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  31.  6
    Ingrid Ott (2012). Service Robotics: An Emergent Technology Field at the Interface Between Industry and Services. Poiesis and Praxis 9 (3-4):219-229.
    The paper at hand analyzes the economic implications of service robots as expected important future technology. The considerations are embedded into global trends, focusing on the interdependencies between services and industry not only in the context of the provision of services but already starting at the level of the innovation process. It is argued that due to the various interdependencies combined with heterogenous application fields, the resulting implications need to be contextualized. Concerning the net labor market effects, (...)
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  32.  8
    Michael Decker, Rüdiger Dillmann, Thomas Dreier, Martin Fischer, Mathias Gutmann, Ingrid Ott & Indra Spiecker Genannt Döhmann (2011). Service Robotics: Do You Know Your New Companion? Framing an Interdisciplinary Technology Assessment. Poiesis and Praxis 8 (1):25-44.
    Service-Robotic—mainly defined as “non-industrial robotics”—is identified as the next economical success story to be expected after robots have been ubiquitously implemented into industrial production lines. Under the heading of service-robotic, we found a widespread area of applications reaching from robotics in agriculture and in the public transportation system to service robots applied in private homes. We propose for our interdisciplinary perspective of technology assessment to take the human user/worker as common focus. In some cases, the user/worker is the (...)
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  33. Miguel Alvarez (2006). Robotics and Development of Intellectual Abilities in Children. International Review of Information Ethics 6:84-90.
    It is necessary to transform the educative experiences into the classrooms so that they favor the development of intellectual abilities of children and teenagers. We must take advantage of the new opportunities that offer information technologies to organize learning environments which they favor those experiences. We considered that to arm and to program robots, of the type of LEGO Mind Storms or the so called "crickets", developed by M. Resnik from MIT, like means so that they children them and young (...)
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  34.  4
    Patrick Lin, Keith Abney & George A. Bekey (eds.) (2011). Robot Ethics: The Ethical and Social Implications of Robotics. The MIT Press.
    Robots today serve in many roles, from entertainer to educator to executioner. As robotics technology advances, ethical concerns become more pressing: Should robots be programmed to follow a code of ethics, if this is even possible? Are there risks in forming emotional bonds with robots? How might society--and ethics--change with robotics? This volume is the first book to bring together prominent scholars and experts from both science and the humanities to explore these and other questions in this emerging (...)
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  35.  5
    Patrick Lin, Keith Abney & George A. Bekey (eds.) (2014). Robot Ethics: The Ethical and Social Implications of Robotics. The MIT Press.
    Robots today serve in many roles, from entertainer to educator to executioner. As robotics technology advances, ethical concerns become more pressing: Should robots be programmed to follow a code of ethics, if this is even possible? Are there risks in forming emotional bonds with robots? How might society--and ethics--change with robotics? This volume is the first book to bring together prominent scholars and experts from both science and the humanities to explore these and other questions in this emerging (...)
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  36. Peter Ducháček (2000). PaABB® Robotics Training Centre in Trnava. IRB: Ethics & Human Research 2400:M2000.
     
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  37. Mark Lee, Ulrich Nehmzow & Marcos Rodrigues (2012). Towards Cognitive Robotics: Robotics, Biology and Developmental Psychology. In David McFarland, Keith Stenning & Maggie McGonigle (eds.), The Complex Mind. Palgrave Macmillan 103.
  38.  39
    Antonio Chella & Riccardo Manzotti (2009). Machine Consciousness: A Manifesto for Robotics. International Journal of Machine Consciousness 1 (1):33-51.
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  39.  10
    David Feil-Seifer (2014). The Tail Shouldn’T Wag the Dog: Why Modeling Dog-Human Interaction is Not Ideal for Socially Assistive Robotics. Interaction Studies 15 (2):195-200.
  40.  14
    Gianmarco Veruggio & Fiorella Operto (2006). Roboethics: A Bottom-Up Interdisciplinary Discourse in the Field of Applied Ethics in Robotics. International Review of Information Ethics 6:2-8.
    This paper deals with the birth of Roboethics. Roboethics is the ethics inspiring the design, development and employment of Intelligent Machines. Roboethics shares many 'sensitive areas' with Computer Ethics, Information Ethics and Bioethics. It investigates the social and ethical problems due to the effects of the Second and Third Industrial Revolutions in the Humans/Machines interaction's domain. Urged by the responsibilities involved in their professions, an increasing number of roboticists from all over the world have started - in (...)
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  41.  29
    Donald S. Borrett, David Shih, Michael Tomko, Sarah Borrett & Hon C. Kwan (2011). Hegelian Phenomenology and Robotics. International Journal of Machine Consciousness 3 (01):219-235.
  42.  1
    George R. Lucas (2011). Industrial Challenges of Military Robotics. Journal of Military Ethics 10 (4):274-295.
    Abstract This article evaluates the ?drive toward greater autonomy? in lethally-armed unmanned systems. Following a summary of the main criticisms and challenges to lethal autonomy, both engineering and ethical, raised by opponents of this effort, the article turns toward solutions or responses that defense industries and military end users might seek to incorporate in design, testing and manufacturing to address these concerns. The way forward encompasses a two-fold testing procedure for reliability incorporating empirical, quantitative benchmarks of performance in compliance with (...)
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  43.  12
    David Feil-Seifer, Kristine Skinner & Maja J. Mataric (2007). Benchmarks for Evaluating Socially Assistive Robotics. Interaction Studies 8 (3):423-439.
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  44.  57
    Massimiliano Cappuccio (2009). Constructing the Space of Action: From Bio-Robotics to Mirror Neurons. World Futures 65 (2):126 – 132.
    This article distinguishes three archetypal ways of articulating spatial cognition: (1) via metric representation of objective geometry, (2) via somatosensory constitution of the peripersonal environment, and (3) via pragmatic comprehension of the finalistic sense of action. The last one is documented by neuroscientific studies concerning mirror neurons. Bio-robotic experiments implementing mirror functions confirm the constitutive role of goal-oriented actions in spatial processes.
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  45.  17
    Maja J. Matarić (1998). Behavior-Based Robotics as a Tool for Synthesis of Artificial Behavior and Analysis of Natural Behavior. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 2 (3):82-86.
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  46.  29
    Peter Danielson (2010). Designing a Machine to Learn About the Ethics of Robotics: The N-Reasons Platform. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 12 (3):251-261.
    We can learn about human ethics from machines. We discuss the design of a working machine for making ethical decisions, the N-Reasons platform, applied to the ethics of robots. This N-Reasons platform builds on web based surveys and experiments, to enable participants to make better ethical decisions. Their decisions are better than our existing surveys in three ways. First, they are social decisions supported by reasons. Second, these results are based on weaker premises, as no exogenous expertise (aside from that (...)
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  47.  15
    Daniel Howlader (2011). Moral and Ethical Questions for Robotics Public Policy. Synesis: A Journal of Science, Technology, Ethics, and Policy 2 (1):G1 - G6.
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  48.  6
    Michael Funk (2016). Patrick Lin, Keith Abney, and George A. Bekey : Robot Ethics: The Ethical and Social Implications of Robotics. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 19 (2):547-548.
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  49. Michael Decker, Rüdiger Dillmann, Thomas Dreier, Martin Fischer, Mathias Gutmann, Ingrid Ott & Indra Spiecker Genannt Döhmann (2011). Service Robotics: Do You Know Your New Companion? Framing an Interdisciplinary Technology Assessment. Poiesis and Praxis 8 (1):25-44.
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  50. Daniela Cerqui, Jutta Weber & Karsten Weber (2006). Ethics in Robotics. International Review of Information Ethics 2:2006.
     
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