Search results for 'Rocque Reynolds' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  26
    Rocque Reynolds (1999). Kant: The Audacity of Judgement. Res Publica 5 (1):67-82.
    In the legal judgement reason demands that it extend itself beyond the mere subjective limits of the self in order that it might fashion a judgement that speaks for the other. This is the universal necessity of the judgement. No claim of truth or the moral law can guarantee that others will agree with this judgement: thus disputation is the risk which reason takes in order to judge at all. The author examines this audacity of judgement by reference to Kant's (...)
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  2. John France, Neithard Bulst & Paul Reynolds (1989). Rodulfus Glaber: The Five Books of the Histories, Edited and Translated by John France, and the Life of St William, Edited by Neithard Bulst and Translated by John France and Paul Reynolds. Oxford University Press Uk.
    The monk Rodulfus Glaber is best known for his Five Books of Histories, a major source for events in the first half of the eleventh century, and valuable above all for revealing the mental furniture of an eleventh-century monk - for his account of the millennium, of relics genuine and false, of church-building, and visions of saints and demons. This edition, the first since 1866, presents the only critical text of the Histories, accompanied by a complete translation and a full (...)
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  3.  73
    Jack Reynolds (2004). Merleau-Ponty and Derrida: Intertwining Embodiment and Alterity. Ohio.
    While there have been many essays devoted to comparing the work of Maurice Merleau-Ponty with that of Jacques Derrida, there has been no sustained book-length treatment of these two French philosophers. Additionally, many of the essays presuppose an oppositional relationship between them, and between phenomenology and deconstruction more generally. -/- Jack Reynolds systematically explores their relationship by analyzing each philosopher in terms of two important and related issues—embodiment and alterity. Focusing on areas with which they are not commonly associated (...)
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  4.  2
    Robin W. Lovin & Frank E. Reynolds (1986). Introduction. Journal of Religious Ethics 14 (1):48-60.
    In this introductory essay, the authors develop implications for ethical theory which relate to the three studies of cosmogony and ethics in the Focus articles by Guberman, Campany, and Read. They suggest that the dialogue between theory and description which Green and C. Reynolds urge in their Focus article should be understood as a search for adequate forms of ethical theory that must go on in both ethics and comparative studies, as well as in interdisciplinary conversations between them. In (...)
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  5.  53
    Jack Reynolds (2007). Park, J. Y., ED., Buddhisms and Deconstructions Lanham, Maryland: Rowman and Littlefield, 2006, 290+ XXII Pp., IBSN: 0742534189, Pb. [REVIEW] Sophia 46 (2):211-213.
    Jack Reynolds has written Merleau-Ponty and Derrida, coedited Understanding Derrida, taught at the Central Institute of Higher Tibetan Studies, and shaken hands with HHDL. He remains in the realm of samsara.
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  6.  5
    Alan Reynolds (2014). Animal Ethics and Politics Beyond the Social Contract. Les Ateliers de l'Éthique / the Ethics Forum 9 (3):208-222.
    Alan Reynolds: This paper is divided into three sections. First, I describe the wide plurality of views on issues of animal ethics, showing that our disagreements here are deep and profound. This fact of reasonable pluralism about animal ethics presents a political problem. According to the dominant liberal tradition of political philosophy, it is impermissible for one faction of people to impose its values upon another faction of people who reasonably reject those values. Instead, we are obligated to justify (...)
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  7. Peter J. Phelan & Peter J. Reynolds (1996). Argument and Evidence: Critical Analysis for the Social Sciences. Routledge.
    Phelan and Reynolds' book is for anyone who needs to evaluate arguments and interpret evidence. It deals with the most fundamental aspects of academic study: * the ability to reason with ideas and evidence * to formulate arguments effectively * to appreciate the interplay between ideas and evidence in academic and media debate _Argument and Evidence_ presents aspects of informal logic and statistical theory in a comprehensible way, enabling students to acquire skills in critical thinking which will outlast their (...)
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  8. Jack Reynolds (2017). Phenomenology, Naturalism and Empirical Science: A Hybrid and Heretical Proposal. Routledge.
    In _Phenomenology, Naturalism and Empirical Science_, Jack Reynolds takes the controversial position that phenomenology and naturalism are compatible, and develops a hybrid account of phenomenology and empirical science. Though phenomenology and naturalism are typically understood as philosophically opposed to one another, Reynolds argues that this resistance is based on an understanding of transcendental phenomenology that is ultimately untenable and in need of updating. Phenomenology, as Reynolds reorients it, is compatible with liberal naturalism, as well as with weak (...)
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  9.  18
    Dee Reynolds (1995). Symbolist Aesthetics and Early Abstract Art: Sites of Imaginary Space. Cambridge University Press.
    This book presents an innovative analysis of the role of imagination as a central concept in both literary and art criticism. Dee Reynolds brings this approach to bear on works by Rimbaud, Mallarme;, Kandinsky, and Mondrian. It allows her to redefine the relationship between Symbolism and abstract art, and to contribute new methodological perspectives to comparative studies of poetry and painting. The late nineteenth and early twentieth century was a crucial period in the emergence of new modes of representation, (...)
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  10. Noel B. Reynolds & Arlene W. Saxonhouse (eds.) (1996). Three Discourses: A Critical Modern Edition of Newly Identified Work of the Young Hobbes. University of Chicago Press.
    For the first time in three centuries, this book brings back into print three discourses now confirmed to have been written by the young Thomas Hobbes. Their contents may well lead to a resolution of the long-standing controversy surrounding Hobbes's early influences and the subsequent development of his thought. The volume begins with the recent history of the discourses, first published as part of the anonymous seventeenth-century work, _Horae Subsecivae_. Drawing upon both internal evidence and external confirmation afforded by new (...)
     
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  11. Noel B. Reynolds & Arlene W. Saxonhouse (eds.) (1997). Three Discourses: A Critical Modern Edition of Newly Identified Work of the Young Hobbes. University of Chicago Press.
    For the first time in three centuries, this book brings back into print three discourses now confirmed to have been written by the young Thomas Hobbes. Their contents may well lead to a resolution of the long-standing controversy surrounding Hobbes's early influences and the subsequent development of his thought. The volume begins with the recent history of the discourses, first published as part of the anonymous seventeenth-century work, _Horae Subsecivae_. Drawing upon both internal evidence and external confirmation afforded by new (...)
     
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  12.  49
    MaryAnn Reynolds & Kristi Yuthas (2008). Moral Discourse and Corporate Social Responsibility Reporting. Journal of Business Ethics 78 (1-2):47 - 64.
    This paper examines voluntary corporate social responsibility (CSR) reporting as a form of moral discourse. It explores how alternative stakeholder perspectives lead to differing perceptions of the process and content of responsible reporting. We contrast traditional stakeholder theory, which views stakeholders as external parties having a social contract with corporations, with an emerging perspective, which views interaction among corporations and constituents as relational in nature. This moves the stakeholder from an external entity to one that is integral (...)
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  13.  12
    Robert M. Nelson, Tom Beauchamp, Victoria A. Miller, William Reynolds, Richard F. Ittenbach & Mary Frances Luce (2011). The Concept of Voluntary Consent. American Journal of Bioethics 11 (8):6-16.
    Our primary focus is on analysis of the concept of voluntariness, with a secondary focus on the implications of our analysis for the concept and the requirements of voluntary informed consent. We propose that two necessary and jointly sufficient conditions must be satisfied for an action to be voluntary: intentionality, and substantial freedom from controlling influences. We reject authenticity as a necessary condition of voluntary action, and we note that constraining situations may or may not undermine voluntariness, depending on the (...)
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  14.  76
    Steven L. Reynolds (2002). Testimony, Knowledge, and Epistemic Goals. Philosophical Studies 110 (2):139 - 161.
    Various considerations are adduced toshow that we require that a testifier know hertestimony. Such a requirement apparentlyimproves testimony. It is argued that the aimof improving testimony explains why we have anduse our concept of knowledge. If we were tointroduce a term of praise for testimony, usingit at first to praise testimony that apparentlyhelped us in our practical projects, it wouldcome to be used as we now use the word``know''.
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  15.  16
    Jack Reynolds, Leesa Davis & Matthew Sharpe (2016). Philosophy, Violence, Metaphor. Sophia 55 (1):1-4.
  16. Steven L. Reynolds (2013). Justification as the Appearance of Knowledge. Philosophical Studies 163 (2):367-383.
    Adequate epistemic justification is best conceived as the appearance, over time, of knowledge to the subject. ‘Appearance’ is intended literally, not as a synonym for belief. It is argued through consideration of examples that this account gets the extension of ‘adequately justified belief’ at least roughly correct. A more theoretical reason is then offered to regard justification as the appearance of knowledge: If we have a knowledge norm for assertion, we do our best to comply with this norm when we (...)
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  17.  16
    Jack Reynolds (2016). Philosophy’s Shame: Reflections on an Ambivalent/Ambiviolent Relationship with Science. Sophia 55 (1):55-70.
    In this paper, I take inspiration from some themes in Ann Murphy’s recent book, Violence and the Philosophical Imaginary, especially her argument that philosophy’s identity and relation to itself depends on an intimate relationship with that which is designated as not itself, the latter of which is a potential source of shame that calls for some form of response. I argue that this shame is particularly acute in regard to the natural sciences, which have gone on in various ways to (...)
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  18. M. Reynolds (2001). An Axiomatization of Full Computation Tree Logic. Journal of Symbolic Logic 66 (3):1011-1057.
    We give a sound and complete axiomatization for the full computation tree logic, CTL*, of R-generable models. This solves a long standing open problem in branching time temporal logic.
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  19. Dov M. Gabbay, Ian Hodkinson & Mark Reynolds (1994). Temporal Logic Mathematical Foundations and Computational Aspects. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  20. Jack Reynolds & Jon Roffe (2006). Deleuze and Merleau-Ponty: Immanence, Univocity and Phenomenology. Journal of the British Society of Phenomenology 37 (3):228-51.
    This paper will seek firstly to understand Deleuze’s main challenges to phenomenology, particularly as they are expressed in The Logic of Sense and What is Philosophy?, although reference will also be made to Pure Immanence and Difference and Repetition. We will then turn to a discussion of one of the few passages in which Deleuze directly engages with Merleau-Ponty, which occurs in the chapter on art in What is Philosophy? In this text, he and Guattari offer a critique of what (...)
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  21.  71
    Scott J. Reynolds, Frank C. Schultz & David R. Hekman (2006). Stakeholder Theory and Managerial Decision-Making: Constraints and Implications of Balancing Stakeholder Interests. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 64 (3):285 - 301.
    Stakeholder theory is widely recognized as a management theory, yet very little research has considered its implications for individual managerial decision-making. In the two studies reported here, we used stakeholder theory to examine managerial decisions about balancing stakeholder interests. Results of Study 1 suggest that indivisible resources and unequal levels of stakeholder saliency constrain managers’ efforts to balance stakeholder interests. Resource divisibility also influenced whether managers used a within-decision or an across-decision approach to balance stakeholder interests. In Study 2 we (...)
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  22.  3
    Jeremy R. Reynolds, Jeffrey M. Zacks & Todd S. Braver (2007). A Computational Model of Event Segmentation From Perceptual Prediction. Cognitive Science 31 (4):613-643.
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  23. Brad Reynolds, WHERE'S WILBER AT? The Further Evolution of Ken Wilber's Integral Vision During the Dawn of the New Millennium.
    Where’s Wilber at? That is, what is the present philosophical position of Ken Wilber, the pundit who many claim to be the world’s most intriguing and foremost philosopher? This is not an easy question to answer, for the breadth of Wilber’s encyclopedic vision is enormous and covers over a quarter century of prolific publication and continual evolution. In other words, Wilber’s work too has evolved over the years. Indeed, its progressive unfoldment in complexity and depth allows us to recognize at (...)
     
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  24.  26
    Scott J. Reynolds, Bradley P. Owens & Alex L. Rubenstein (2012). Moral Stress: Considering the Nature and Effects of Managerial Moral Uncertainty. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 106 (4):491-502.
    To better illuminate aspects of stress that are relevant to the moral domain, we present a definition and theoretical model of “moral stress.” Our definition posits that moral stress is a psychological state born of an individual’s uncertainty about his or her ability to fulfill relevant moral obligations. This definition assumes a self-and-others relational basis for moral stress. Accordingly, our model draws from a theory of the self (identity theory) and a theory of others (stakeholder theory) to suggest that this (...)
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  25.  1
    Andrew Reynolds (2007). The Theory of the Cell State and the Question of Cell Autonomy in Nineteenth and Early Twentieth-Century Biology. Science in Context 20 (1):71.
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  26.  7
    Jack Reynolds (2016). Phenomenology and Naturalism: A Hybrid and Heretical Proposal. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 24 (3):393-412.
    In this paper I aim to develop a largely non-empirical case for the compatibility of phenomenology and naturalism. To do so, I will criticise what I take to be the standard construal of the relationship between transcendental phenomenology and naturalism, and defend a ‘minimal’ version of phenomenology that is compatible with liberal naturalism in the ontological register and with weak forms of methodological naturalism, the latter of which is understood as advocating ‘results continuity’, over the long haul, with the relevant (...)
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  27.  4
    Andrew S. Reynolds (2014). The Deaths of a Cell: How Language and Metaphor Influence the Science of Cell Death. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 48:175-184.
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  28.  3
    Kai Chi Yam & Scott J. Reynolds (forthcoming). The Effects of Victim Anonymity on Unethical Behavior. Journal of Business Ethics.
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  29.  86
    Jack Reynolds (2007). Wounds and Scars: Deleuze on the Time (and the Ethics) of the Event. Deleuze Studies 2 (1):15.
    This essay examines Deleuze's account of time and the wound in The Logic of Sense and, to a lesser extent, in Difference and Repetition. As such, it will also explicate his understanding of the event, as well as the notoriously opaque ethics of counter-actualisation that are bound up with it, before raising certain problems that are associated with the transcendental and ethical priority that he accords to the event and what he calls the time of Aion. I will conclude by (...)
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  30. Corinne Jola, Shantel Ehrenberg & Dee Reynolds (2012). The Experience of Watching Dance: Phenomenological–Neuroscience Duets. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 11 (1):17-37.
    This paper discusses possible correspondences between neuroscientific findings and phenomenologically informed methodologies in the investigation of kinesthetic empathy in watching dance. Interest in phenomenology has recently increased in cognitive science (Gallagher and Zahavi 2008 ) and dance scholars have recently contributed important new insights into the use of phenomenology in dance studies (e.g. Legrand and Ravn (Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 8(3):389–408, 2009 ); Parviainen (Dance Research Journal 34(1):11–26, 2002 ); Rothfield (Topoi 24:43–53, 2005 )). In vision research, coherent neural (...)
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  31.  75
    Jack Reynolds (2007). Wounds and Scars: Deleuze on the Time and Ethics of the Event. Deleuze Studies 1 (2):144-166.
    This paper explores the idea that Deleuze’s oeuvre is best understood as a philosophy of the wound, synonymous with a philosophy of the event. Although this wound/scar typology may appear to be a metaphorical conceit, the motif of the wound recurs frequently and perhaps even symptomatically in many of Deleuze’s texts, particularly where he is attempting to delineate some of the most important differences (transcendental, temporal, and ethical) between himself and his phenomenological predecessors. I raise some some potential problems for (...)
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  32. Steven L. Reynolds (2013). Effective Sceptical Hypotheses. Theoria 79 (3):262-278.
    The familiar Cartesian sceptical arguments all involve an explanation of our experiences. An account of the persuasive power of the sceptical arguments should explain why this is so. This supports a diagnosis of the error in Cartesian sceptical arguments according to which they mislead us into regarding our perceptual beliefs as if they were justified as inferences to the best explanation. I argue that they have instead a perceptual justification that does not involve inference to the best explanation and that (...)
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  33.  29
    Mary Ann Reynolds (2000). Professionalism, Ethical Codes and the Internal Auditor: A Moral Argument. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 24 (2):115 - 124.
    This paper examines the case of the internal auditor from a sociological and ethical perspective. Is it appropriate to extend the designation of professional to internal auditors? The discussion includes criteria from the sociology literature on professionalism. Further, professional ethical codes are compared. Internal auditors' code of ethics is found to have a strong moral approach, contrasting to the more instrumental approach of certified professional accountants. Internal auditors are noted as using their code of ethics to help resolve professional ethical (...)
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  34.  4
    Damien Shortt, Paul Reynolds, Mary McAteer & Fiona Hallett, To Believe, To Think, To Know…To Teach? Ethical Deliberation in Teacher-Education.
    Part 1 What Do Teachers Need to Know? Part 2 What Makes a Good Teacher? Part 3 Being a Teacher?
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  35.  33
    Jack Reynolds (2014). Existentialism, Philosophy Of. In Michael T. Gibbons (ed.), Encyclopedia of Political Thought. Wiley-Blackwell 1194–1199.
    This chapter examines the connections between French existentialism and politics. Fellow travellers like Sartre, Merleau-Ponty, and de Beauvoir saw themselves as engaging with two theoretical trajectories that for them dominated the mid-twentieth century intellectual milieu, one of which was ostensibly apolitical (phenomenology), the other of which involved a politicised understanding of philosophy (Marxism). Part of the motivation behind renewing phenomenology as existential phenomenology, as opposed to classical Husserlian phenomenology, was to allow them both to comprehend what was taking place during (...)
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  36. Jack Reynolds (2013). Phenomenology and Virtue Ethics: Complementary Anti-Theoretical Methodological and Ethical Trajectories? In K. Hermberg P. Gyllenhammer (ed.), Phenomenology and Virtue Ethics. Continuum
    In this paper, I argue that the negative injunctions against certain ways of conceiving of the ethico-political that we can draw explicitly from the methodological strictures of phenomenology are also consistent with some of the core more positive dimensions of contemporary virtue ethics (especially at the more anti-theoretical end of the virtue ethical spectrum), and that central aspects of virtue ethics are consistent with most of the explicit reflections on ethical matters proffered by canonical phenomenologists.
     
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  37.  13
    Jack Reynolds (2009). The Master-Slave Dialectic and the “Sado-Masochistic Entity”. Angelaki 14 (3):11-26.
  38.  1
    Jeremy R. Reynolds & Randall C. O'Reilly (2009). Developing PFC Representations Using Reinforcement Learning. Cognition 113 (3):281-292.
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  39. Steven L. Reynolds (1989). Imagining Oneself to Be Another. Noûs 23 (5):615-633.
    Imagining that I am Napoleon is not (normally) imagining an impossibility. It is (or at least may be) just adopting a first person way of imagining Napoleon. The images and bits of narrative using 'I' are intended to refer to Napoleon and his surroundings, in something like the way that a salt shaker can stand for a regiment of troops when the general says "This is the third regiment' while explaining his plans at the breakfast table.
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  40.  37
    H. Reynolds (2010). Medical Ear in the Early Morning Tennis Group—When to Advise and What to Say. Pharos Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Med Soc 73:14 - 15.
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  41.  4
    C. S. Reynolds (2014). On the Planetary Capacity to Sustain Human Populations. Ethics in Science and Environmental Politics 14 (1):33-41.
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  42.  27
    Jack Reynolds (2010). Time Out of Joint: Between Phenomenology and Poststructuralism. Parrhesia: A Critical Journal of Philosophy (9):55-64.
    In this essay, I take off from Nathan Widder’s impressive book, Reflections on Time and Politics, by highlighting what I take to be one of the major internal differences within continental philosophy that Widder’s book helps to make manifest: that between phenomenology and post-structuralism (which includes the renewed interest in, and use of, Nietzsche and Bergson’s work by poststructuralist philosophers). While many deplore the use of umbrella terms like these, I hope to be able to proffer some useful generalisations about (...)
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  43.  12
    Jack Reynolds (2008). Deleuze’s Other-Structure. Symposium 12 (1):67-88.
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  44.  12
    Jack Reynolds (2002). Merleau-Ponty, Levinas, and the Alterity of the Other. Symposium 6 (1):63-78.
  45. Jesse Reynolds (2014). Response to Svoboda and Irvine. Ethics, Policy and Environment 17 (2):183-185.
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  46. Andrew Reynolds (2008). Ernst Haeckel and the Theory of the Cell State: Remarks on the History of a Bio-Political Metaphor. History of Science 46 (152):123-152.
     
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  47.  5
    Andrew Reynolds (2008). Amoebae as Exemplary Cells: The Protean Nature of an Elementary Organism. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 41 (2):307 - 337.
    In the nineteenth century protozoology and early cell biology intersected through the nexus of Darwin's theory of evolution. As single-celled organisms, amoebae offered an attractive focus of study for researchers seeking evolutionary relationships between the cells of humans and other animals, and their primitive appearance made them a favourite model for the ancient ancestor of all living things. Their resemblance to human and other metazoan cells made them popular objects of study among morphologists, physiologists, and even those investigating animal behaviour. (...)
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  48.  52
    Jack Reynolds (2008). Transcendental Priority and Deleuzian Normativity. Deleuze Studies 3 (1):15.
    I am grateful that someone whose work I greatly admire could be the philosopher to so eloquently and succinctly cut to the heart of the problem that I posed in the previous issue of Deleuze Studies. James Williams' critical reply leaves me, prima facie, confronted by a stark alternative: either I have misunderstood Deleuze, or I have illustrated problems and lacunae in Deleuze. I will suggest, however, that this is a false alternative, and that Williams' and my divergent accounts of (...)
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  49.  5
    Andrew Reynolds (2010). The Redoubtable Cell. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 41 (3):194-201.
    The cell theory—the thesis that all life is made up of one or more cells, the fundamental structural and physiological unit—is one of the most celebrated achievements of modern biological science. And yet from its very inception in the nineteenth century it has faced repeated criticism from some biologists. Why do some continue to criticize the cell theory, and how has it managed nevertheless to keep burying its undertakers? The answers to these questions reveal the complex nature of the cell (...)
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  50.  38
    Zachary Reynolds & Brian Glenney (forthcoming). When Sensory Substitution Devices Strike Back: An Interactive Training Paradigm. Philosophy Study.
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