Search results for 'Rocque Reynolds' (try it on Scholar)

639 found
Sort by:
  1. Rocque Reynolds (1999). Kant: The Audacity of Judgement. Res Publica 5 (1):67-82.score: 240.0
    In the legal judgement reason demands that it extend itself beyond the mere subjective limits of the self in order that it might fashion a judgement that speaks for the other. This is the universal necessity of the judgement. No claim of truth or the moral law can guarantee that others will agree with this judgement: thus disputation is the risk which reason takes in order to judge at all. The author examines this audacity of judgement by reference to Kant's (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Jack Reynolds (2004). Merleau-Ponty and Derrida: Intertwining Embodiment and Alterity. Ohio.score: 60.0
    While there have been many essays devoted to comparing the work of Maurice Merleau-Ponty with that of Jacques Derrida, there has been no sustained book-length treatment of these two French philosophers. Additionally, many of the essays presuppose an oppositional relationship between them, and between phenomenology and deconstruction more generally. -/- Jack Reynolds systematically explores their relationship by analyzing each philosopher in terms of two important and related issues—embodiment and alterity. Focusing on areas with which they are not commonly associated (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Dee Reynolds (1995). Symbolist Aesthetics and Early Abstract Art: Sites of Imaginary Space. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    This book presents an innovative analysis of the role of imagination as a central concept in both literary and art criticism. Dee Reynolds brings this approach to bear on works by Rimbaud, Mallarme;, Kandinsky, and Mondrian. It allows her to redefine the relationship between Symbolism and abstract art, and to contribute new methodological perspectives to comparative studies of poetry and painting. The late nineteenth and early twentieth century was a crucial period in the emergence of new modes of representation, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Robin W. Lovin & Frank E. Reynolds (1986). Introduction. Journal of Religious Ethics 14 (1):48 - 60.score: 60.0
    In this introductory essay, the authors develop implications for ethical theory which relate to the three studies of cosmogony and ethics in the Focus articles by Guberman, Campany, and Read. They suggest that the dialogue between theory and description which Green and C. Reynolds urge in their Focus article should be understood as a search for adequate forms of ethical theory that must go on in both ethics and comparative studies, as well as in interdisciplinary conversations between them. (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Steven L. Reynolds (2013). Justification as the Appearance of Knowledge. Philosophical Studies 163 (2):367-383.score: 30.0
    Adequate epistemic justification is best conceived as the appearance, over time, of knowledge to the subject. ‘Appearance’ is intended literally, not as a synonym for belief. It is argued through consideration of examples that this account gets the extension of ‘adequately justified belief’ at least roughly correct. A more theoretical reason is then offered to regard justification as the appearance of knowledge: If we have a knowledge norm for assertion, we do our best to comply with this norm when we (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Jack Reynolds (2004). Derrida and Deleuze on Time and the Future. Borderlands 3 (1):15.score: 30.0
    This paper compares the "future politics", and the philosophies of time, of Derrida and Deleuze.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Jack Reynolds & Jon Roffe (2006). Deleuze and Merleau-Ponty: Immanence, Univocity and Phenomenology. Journal of the British Society of Phenomenology 37 (3):228-51.score: 30.0
    This paper will seek firstly to understand Deleuze’s main challenges to phenomenology, particularly as they are expressed in The Logic of Sense (1968) and What is Philosophy? (1991), although reference will also be made to Pure Immanence (1994) and Difference and Repetition (1968). We will then turn to a discussion of one of the few passages in which Deleuze (with Guattari) directly engages with Merleau-Ponty, which occurs in the chapter on art in What is Philosophy? In this text, he and (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Jack Reynolds (2010). Common Sense and Philosophical Methodology: Some Metaphilosophical Reflections on Analytic Philosophy and Deleuze. Philosophical Forum 41 (3):231-258.score: 30.0
    On the question of precisely what role common sense (or related datum like folk psychology, trust in pre-theoretic/intuitive judgments, etc.) should have in reigning in the possible excesses of our philosophical methods, the so-called ‘continental’ answer to this question, for the vast majority, would be “as little as possible”, whereas the analytic answer for the vast majority would be “a reasonably central one”. While this difference at the level of both rhetoric and meta-philosophy is sometimes – perhaps often – problematised (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Steven L. Reynolds (2011). Doxastic Voluntarism and the Function of Epistemic Evaluations. Erkenntnis 75 (1):19-35.score: 30.0
    Control of our own beliefs is allegedly required for the truth of epistemic evaluations, such as S ought to believe that p , or S ought to suspend judgment (and so refrain from any belief) whether p . However, we cannot usually believe or refrain from believing at will. I agree with a number of recent authors in thinking that this apparent conflict is to be resolved by distinguishing reasons for believing that give evidence that p from reasons that make (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Steven L. Reynolds (2013). Effective Sceptical Hypotheses. Theoria 79 (3):262-278.score: 30.0
    The familiar Cartesian sceptical arguments all involve an explanation of our experiences. An account of the persuasive power of the sceptical arguments should explain why this is so. This supports a diagnosis of the error in Cartesian sceptical arguments according to which they mislead us into regarding our perceptual beliefs as if they were justified as inferences to the best explanation. I argue that they have instead a perceptual justification that does not involve inference to the best explanation and that (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Jack Reynolds (2010). Problems of Other Minds: Solutions and Dissolutions in Analytic and Continental Philosophy. Philosophy Compass 5 (4):326-335.score: 30.0
    While there is a great diversity of treatments of other minds and inter-subjectivity within both analytic and continental philosophy, this article specifies some of the core structural differences between these treatments. Although there is no canonical account of the problem of other minds that can be baldly stated and that is exhaustive of both traditions, the problem(s) of other minds can be loosely defined in family resemblances terms. It seems to have: (1) an epistemological dimension (How do we know that (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Steven L. Reynolds (2000). The Argument From Illusion. Noûs 34 (4):604-621.score: 30.0
    In an attempt to revive discussion of the argument from illusion this paper amends the classic version of the argument to avoid Austin's main objection. It then develops and defends a version of the intentional object reply to the argument, arguing that an "unendorsed story" account of reports of dreams and hallucinations avoids commitment to nonexistent objects.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Jack Reynolds (2002). Merleau-Ponty, Levinas, and the Alterity of the Other. Symposium: The Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy 6 (1):63-78.score: 30.0
    Suggesting that phenomenology results in an “imperialism of the same” that considers the other only in terms of their effect upon the subject rather than in their genuine alterity, Levinas initiates a line of thought that can still be discerned in the work of Foucault, Derrida and Claude Lefort. However, this paper argues that Merleau-Ponty’s work is capable of avoiding this line of criticism, and that his position is an important alternative to the more dominant Derridean and Levinasian conceptions of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Jack Reynolds (2006). Negotiating the Non-Negotiable: Rawls, Derrida and the Intertwining of Political Calculation and Ultra-Politics. Theory and Event 9 (3):15.score: 30.0
    I examine the relationship that obtains between the work of Derrida and Rawls, not least because of the conviction that Derrida (and post-structuralism more generally) offers certain invaluable things to political thought that analytic political philosophy would do well to take account of, particularly as concerns the relation between time and politics. In Derrida’s case, his emphasis on the radical difference of the future, the ‘to come’, serves as a guardrail against political absolutisms of all sorts. On his view, when (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Steven L. Reynolds (2003). The Model Theoretic Argument, Indirect Realism, and the Causal Theory of Reference Objection. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 84 (2):146-154.score: 30.0
  16. Jack Reynolds & James Chase (2010). Analytic Versus Continental: Arguments on the Methods and Value of Philosophy, Co-Authored with James Chase, Stocksfield, UK: Acumen Publishing 2010. ISBN 978-1-84465-245-7. [REVIEW] Acumen.score: 30.0
    Throughout much of the 20th Century, the relationship between analytic and continental philosophy has been one of disinterest, caution or hostility. Recent debates in philosophy have highlighted some of the similarities between the two approaches and even envisaged a post-continental and post-analytic philosophy. -/- Opening with a history of key encounters between philosophers of opposing camps since the late 19th Century - from Frege and Husserl to Derrida and Searle - the book goes on to explore in detail the main (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Scott J. Reynolds, Frank C. Schultz & David R. Hekman (2006). Stakeholder Theory and Managerial Decision-Making: Constraints and Implications of Balancing Stakeholder Interests. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 64 (3):285 - 301.score: 30.0
    Stakeholder theory is widely recognized as a management theory, yet very little research has considered its implications for individual managerial decision-making. In the two studies reported here, we used stakeholder theory to examine managerial decisions about balancing stakeholder interests. Results of Study 1 suggest that indivisible resources and unequal levels of stakeholder saliency constrain managers’ efforts to balance stakeholder interests. Resource divisibility also influenced whether managers used a within-decision or an across-decision approach to balance stakeholder interests. In Study 2 we (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Jack Reynolds (2008). Touched by Time: Some Critical Reflections on Derrida's Engagement with Merleau-Ponty in le Toucher. Sophia 47 (3):311-25.score: 30.0
    The philosophical relationship that obtains between the work of Merleau-Ponty and Derrida has continued to intrigue and preoccupy many of us despite, or perhaps even partly because of, the fact that Derrida did not accord the work of Merleau-Ponty much attention during his remarkably prolific career. Two relatively recent books of Derrida’s have addressed this gap: Memoirs of the Blind and, more recently, On Touching. However, although Derrida proposes an “entire re-reading” of the later Merleau-Ponty in Memoirs of the Blind, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Steven L. Reynolds (2006). Realism and the Meaning of 'Real'. Noûs 40 (3):468–494.score: 30.0
    A new account of the semantic function (character) of ‘real’ and ‘really’ is defended. ‘Really’ as a sentential operator typically indicates that a report of what has been represented elsewhere ends and subsequent discourse is to be taken as making claims about the world. ‘Real’ and ‘really’ as applied to nouns or predicate phrases indicate that something is not being called an F merely because it represents an F. A way of drawing the distinction between realism and anti-realism based on (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Jack Reynolds (2008). The Implicit and Presupposed Theological Turn in Phenomenology. Sophia 47 (3):261-263.score: 30.0
  21. Steven L. Reynolds (2002). Testimony, Knowledge, and Epistemic Goals. Philosophical Studies 110 (2):139 - 161.score: 30.0
    Various considerations are adduced toshow that we require that a testifier know hertestimony. Such a requirement apparentlyimproves testimony. It is argued that the aimof improving testimony explains why we have anduse our concept of knowledge. If we were tointroduce a term of praise for testimony, usingit at first to praise testimony that apparentlyhelped us in our practical projects, it wouldcome to be used as we now use the word``know''.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Jack Reynolds, James Chase, James Williams & Edwin Mares (eds.) (2010/2011). Postanalytic and Metacontinental: Crossing Philosophical Divides. Continuum.score: 30.0
    Analytic and Continental philosophy have become increasingly specialised and differentiated fields of endeavour. This important collection of essays details some of the more significant methodological and philosophical differences that have separated the two traditions, as well as examining the manner in which received understandings of the divide are being challenged by certain thinkers whose work might best be described as post-analytic and meta-continental. -/- Together these essays offer a well-defined sense of the field, of its once dominant distinctions and of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Jack Reynolds (2009). The Master-Slave Dialectic and the 'Sado-Masochistic Entity': Some Objections. Angelaki: Journal of the Theoretical Humanities 14 (3):11-25.score: 30.0
    Hegel’s famous analyses of the ‘master-slave dialectic’, and the more general struggle for recognition which it is a part of, have been remarkably influential throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Bound up with the dominance of this idea, however, has been a corresponding treatment of sadism and masochism as complicit projects that are mutually necessary for one another in a manner that is structurally isomorphic with the way in which master and slave depend on one another. In clinical diagnoses it (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Jack Reynolds (2007). Wounds and Scars: Deleuze on the Time (and the Ethics) of the Event. Deleuze Studies 2 (1):15.score: 30.0
    This essay examines Deleuze's account of time and the wound in The Logic of Sense and, to a lesser extent, in Difference and Repetition. As such, it will also explicate his understanding of the event, as well as the notoriously opaque ethics of counter-actualisation that are bound up with it, before raising certain problems that are associated with the transcendental and ethical priority that he accords to the event and what he calls the time of Aion. I will conclude by (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Felicity Joseph, Jack Reynolds & Ashley Woodward (eds.) (2011). Continuum Companion to Existentialism. Continuum.score: 30.0
    The Continuum Companion to Existentialism offers the definitive guide to a key area of modern European philosophy. The book covers the fundamental questions asked by existentialism, providing valuable guidance for students and researchers to some of the many important and enduring contributions of existentialist thinkers. Eighteen specially commissioned essays from an international team of experts explore existentialism’s relationship to philosophical method; ontology; politics; psychoanalysis; ethics; religion; literature; emotion; feminism and sexuality; cognitive science; authenticity and the self; its significance in Latin (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Steven L. Reynolds (1991). Knowing How to Believe with Justification. Philosophical Studies 64 (3):273-292.score: 30.0
    Non-propositional experiences can help justify beliefs, contrary to recent claims made by Donald Davidson and Laurence Bonjour. It is argued that a perceptual belief is justified if there are no undermining beliefs and it was arrived at in response to an experience through an adequate exercise of properly learned recognitional skills.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Steven L. Reynolds (2008). Why We Should Prefer Knowledge. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 32 (1):79-93.score: 30.0
    This paper discusses Plato’s question from the Meno : Why should we prefer knowledge that p over mere true belief that p? I find I just do prefer knowledge, and not for any further benefit that I am aware of in the particular case. But I should have that preference, because given our practice of approving of testimony only if uttered with knowledge, I could fail to prefer knowledge, when other things seem to me to be equal, only by having (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Robert I. Reynolds (1988). A Psychological Definition of Illusion. Philosophical Psychology 1 (2):217-223.score: 30.0
    The psychological concept of illusion is defined as a process involving an interaction of logical and empirical considerations. Common usage suggests that an illusion is a discrepancy between one's awareness and some stimulus. Following preliminary definitions of classes of stimuli, five definitions of illusion are considered, based upon the possible discrepancies between awareness and a stimulus. It is found that each of these definitions fails to make important distinctions, even to the point of equating all illusory and perceptual phenomena. This (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Jack Reynolds (2006). Sadism and Masochism: A Symptomatology of Analytic and Continental Philosophy. Parrhesia 1 (1):15.score: 30.0
    There has recently been a plethora of attempts to understand the key differences that separate the analytic and continental traditions of philosophy, often involving either painstaking descriptions of the divergent argumentative techniques and methodologies that concern them, or comparatively examining in detail the work of certain major theorists in both traditions (e.g. Rawls and Derrida, Lewis and Deleuze). While partly drawing on these two approaches, in this particular essay I instead propose a rather more speculative way of teasing out the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Matheson Russell & Jack Reynolds (2011). Transcendental Arguments About Other Minds and Intersubjectivity. Philosophy Compass 6 (5):300-11.score: 30.0
    This article describes some of the main arguments for the existence of other minds, and intersubjectivity more generally, that depend upon a transcendental justification. This means that our focus will be largely on ‘continental’ philosophy, not only because of the abiding interest in this tradition in thematising intersubjectivity, but also because transcendental reasoning is close to ubiquitous in continental philosophy. Neither point holds for analytic philosophy. As such, this essay will introduce some of the important contributions of Edmund Husserl, Martin (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Andrew Reynolds (1999). What is Historicism? International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 13 (3):275 – 287.score: 30.0
    “Historicism” has become a ubiquitous and equivocal term. A classification is given here of five separate uses of the term currently in vogue, each provided with a unique qualifying adjective to help keep them distinct. I then offer a few objections to some of the more radical conclusions which have been drawn by proponents of a specific version of historicism, one associated with “postmodernism “. The positions of Rorty and Putnam are contrasted as examples of strong and weak degrees of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Jack Reynolds (2007). Wounds and Scars: Deleuze on the Time and Ethics of the Event. Deleuze Studies 1 (2):144-166.score: 30.0
    This paper explores the idea that Deleuze’s oeuvre is best understood as a philosophy of the wound, synonymous with a philosophy of the event. Although this wound/scar typology may appear to be a metaphorical conceit, the motif of the wound recurs frequently and perhaps even symptomatically in many of Deleuze’s texts, particularly where he is attempting to delineate some of the most important differences (transcendental, temporal, and ethical) between himself and his phenomenological predecessors. I raise some some potential problems for (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Jack Reynolds (2006). Dreyfus and Deleuze on l'Habitude, Coping, and Trauma in Skill Acquisition. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 14 (4):539 – 559.score: 30.0
    One of the more important and under-thematized philosophical disputes in contemporary European philosophy pertains to the significance that is given to the inter-related phenomena of habituality, skilful coping, and learning. This paper examines this dispute by focusing on the work of the Merleau-Ponty and Heidegger-inspired phenomenologist Hubert Dreyfus, and contrasting his analyses with those of Gilles Deleuze, particularly in Difference and Repetition. Both Deleuze and Dreyfus pay a lot of attention to learning and coping, while arriving at distinct conclusions about (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. MaryAnn Reynolds & Kristi Yuthas (2008). Moral Discourse and Corporate Social Responsibility Reporting. Journal of Business Ethics 78 (1-2):47 - 64.score: 30.0
    This paper examines voluntary corporate social responsibility (CSR) reporting as a form of moral discourse. It explores how alternative stakeholder perspectives lead to differing perceptions of the process and content of responsible reporting. We contrast traditional stakeholder theory, which views stakeholders as external parties having a social contract with corporations, with an emerging perspective, which views interaction among corporations and constituents as relational in nature. This moves the stakeholder from an external entity to one that is integral to corporate activity. (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Jack Reynolds (2010). Derrida, Friendship, and the Transcendental Priority of the 'Untimely'. Philosophy and Social Criticism 6 (36):663-676.score: 30.0
    This article examines Derrida’s insistence on the contretemps that breaks open time, paying particular attention to Politics of Friendship and the way in which this book envisages the ‘untimely’ as both interrupting, and making possible, friendship. Although I suggest that Derrida’s temporal deconstruction of the Aristotelian distinction between utility and ‘perfect’ friendships is convincing, I also argue that Derrida’s own account of friendship is itself touched by time, in the peculiar sense of ‘touched’ that connotes affected and wounded. Derrida’s work (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Mark Reynolds (1996). Axiomatising First-Order Temporal Logic: Until and Since Over Linear Time. Studia Logica 57 (2-3):279 - 302.score: 30.0
    We present an axiomatisation for the first-order temporal logic with connectives Until and Since over the class of all linear flows of time. Completeness of the axiom system is proved.We also add a few axioms to find a sound and complete axiomatisation for the first order temporal logic of Until and Since over rational numbers time.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Jack Reynolds (2002). Kirby, Merleau-Ponty, and the Question of an Embodied Deconstruction. Contretemps (3):133-47.score: 30.0
    In Telling Flesh: the Substance 0f the C0rporeul, Vicki Kirby suggests, among other things, that it is not in the interests of feminism to propound what she describes as an ‘inessentialist’ position in regards to embodiment. While she objects to undifferentiating biological givens that might, for example, attempt to construe women as confined to a nurturing role, she also does not want to simplistically insist that embodiment has nothing to do with subjectivity. To pose the problem in terms more closely (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Steven L. Reynolds (2009). Making Up the Truth. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 90 (3):315-335.score: 30.0
    A recent account of the meaning of 'real' leads to a view of what anti-realism should be that resembles fictionalism, while not being committed to fictionalism as such or being subject to some of the more obvious objections to that view. This account of anti-realism explains how we might 'make up' what is true in areas such as mathematics or ethics, and yet these made-up truths are resistant to alterations, even by our collective decisions. Finally it is argued that the (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Jack Reynolds (2008). Transcendental Priority and Deleuzian Normativity. A Reply to James Williams. Deleuze Studies 2 (1):101-108.score: 30.0
    I am grateful that someone whose work I greatly admire could be the philosopher to so eloquently and succinctly cut to the heart of the problem that I posed in the previous issue of Deleuze Studies. James Williams' critical reply leaves me, prima facie, confronted by a stark alternative: either I have misunderstood Deleuze, or I have illustrated problems and lacunae in Deleuze. I will suggest, however, that this is a false alternative, and that Williams' and my divergent accounts of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Felicity Joseph & Jack Reynolds (2011). Existentialism, Phenomenology and Philosophical Method. In Felicity Joseph, Jack Reynolds & Ashley Woodward (eds.), Continuum Companion to Existentialism. Continuum.score: 30.0
    This chapter explores some of the similarities and differences in the philosophical methods of five philosophers often considered existentialists: Heidegger, Sartre, Merleau-Ponty, de Beauvoir and Marcel. The relationship between existentialism and phenomenological methods, as well as transcendental reasoning in general, is examined.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Jack Reynolds, Maurice Merleau-Ponty. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 30.0
    Maurice Merleau-Ponty’s work is commonly associated with the philosophical movement called existentialism and its intention to begin with an analysis of the concrete experiences, perceptions, and difficulties, of human existence. However, he never propounded quite the same extreme accounts of radical freedom, being-towards-death, anguished responsibility, and conflicting relations with others, for which existentialism became both famous and notorious in the 1940s and 1950s. Perhaps because of this, he did not initially receive the same amount of attention as his French contemporaries (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Sally Gunz, John McCutcheon & Frank Reynolds (2009). Independence, Conflict of Interest and the Actuarial Profession. Journal of Business Ethics 89 (1):77 - 89.score: 30.0
    The actuarial profession has a long history of providing critical expertise to society. The services delivered are some of the most complex and mysterious to outsiders of all professions but little has been written about the professional responsibilities of actuaries in the academic literature beyond that of the profession itself. This paper makes the case that the issues surrounding professional independence of actuaries are, in principle, similar to those that faced the audit profession before the scandals and resultant regulatory changes (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. J. Burr & P. Reynolds (2008). Thinking Ethically About Genetic Inheritance: Liberal Rights, Communitarianism and the Right to Privacy for Parents of Donor Insemination Children. Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (4):281-284.score: 30.0
  44. Steven L. Reynolds (1989). Imagining Oneself to Be Another. Noûs 23 (5):615-633.score: 30.0
  45. Jack Reynolds (2009). "Continental Philosophy and Chickening Out". International Journal of Philosophical Studies 17 (2):255-72.score: 30.0
    This paper critically engages with Simon Glendinning’s The Idea of Continental Philosophy. Glendinning purports to show that there can be no coherent philosophical understanding of continental philosophy as comprising any sort of distinct or unified tradition. In this paper, however, I raise some questions about the largely unilateral direction in which his account of the motives for the divide is pursued: analytic philosophy is envisaged as pathologically projecting the internal and unavoidable threat of philosophical failure upon an external ‘continental’ other. (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Jack Reynolds (2002). Habituality and Undecidability: A Comparison of Merleau-Ponty and Derrida on the Decision. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 10 (4):449 – 466.score: 30.0
    This essay examines the relationship that obtains between Merleau-Ponty and Derrida through exploring an interesting point of dissension in their respective accounts of decision-making. Merleau-Ponty's early philosophy emphasizes the body-subject's tendency to seek an equilibrium with the world (by acquiring skills and establishing what he refers to as 'intentional arcs'), and towards deciding in an embodied and habitual manner that minimizes any confrontation with what might be termed a decision-making aporia. On the other hand, in his later writings, Derrida frequently (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Mary Ann Reynolds (2000). Professionalism, Ethical Codes and the Internal Auditor: A Moral Argument. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 24 (2):115 - 124.score: 30.0
    This paper examines the case of the internal auditor from a sociological and ethical perspective. Is it appropriate to extend the designation of professional to internal auditors? The discussion includes criteria from the sociology literature on professionalism. Further, professional ethical codes are compared. Internal auditors' code of ethics is found to have a strong moral approach, contrasting to the more instrumental approach of certified professional accountants. Internal auditors are noted as using their code of ethics to help resolve professional ethical (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Corinne Jola, Shantel Ehrenberg & Dee Reynolds (2012). The Experience of Watching Dance: Phenomenological–Neuroscience Duets. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 11 (1):17-37.score: 30.0
    This paper discusses possible correspondences between neuroscientific findings and phenomenologically informed methodologies in the investigation of kinesthetic empathy in watching dance. Interest in phenomenology has recently increased in cognitive science (Gallagher and Zahavi 2008 ) and dance scholars have recently contributed important new insights into the use of phenomenology in dance studies (e.g. Legrand and Ravn (Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 8(3):389–408, 2009 ); Parviainen (Dance Research Journal 34(1):11–26, 2002 ); Rothfield (Topoi 24:43–53, 2005 )). In vision research, coherent neural (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. James F. Reynolds & David C. Paris (1979). The Concept of `Choice' and Arrow's Theorem. Ethics 89 (4):354-371.score: 30.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. D. Reynolds (2000). Protecting the Human Subjects of Social Science Research--The Role of Institutional Review Boards. Bioethics Forum 16 (4):31.score: 30.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 639