6 found
Sort by:
  1. Rodney L. Taylor (1998). The Religious Character of the Confucian Tradition. Philosophy East and West 48 (1):80-107.
    In modern scholarship, Confucianism has only with some difficulty been placed among the religious traditions of the world, being viewed as more a form of humanism than religion. The question is revisited here whether Confucianism can be described as a religion by employing a definition of religion that focuses on both the identification of an Absolute and the transformation of the individual toward the Absolute. Arguing that the religious basis for the tradition can be found in the identification of an (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Rodney L. Taylor (1983). The Sudden/Gradual Paradigm and Neo-Confucian Mind-Cultivation. Philosophy East and West 33 (1):17-34.
  3. Rodney L. Taylor (1982). Proposition and Praxis: The Dilemma of Neo-Confucian Syncretism. Philosophy East and West 32 (2):187-199.
  4. Rodney L. Taylor (1979). Meditation in Ming Neo-Orthodoxy: Kaop' an-Lung's Writings on Quiet-Sitting. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 6 (2):149-182.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Rodney L. Taylor (1979). Religion and Utilitarianism: Mo Tzu on Spirits and Funerals. Philosophy East and West 29 (3):337-346.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Rodney L. Taylor (1975). Neo-Confucianism, Sagehood and the Religious Dimension. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 2 (4):389-415.