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  1. Placido Bucolo, Roger Crisp & Bart Schultz (eds.) (forthcoming). Proceedings of the Second World Congress on Henry Sidgwick: Ethics, Psychics, Politics. Universita degli Studi di Catania.
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  2. Roger Crisp (forthcoming). A Third Method of Ethics? Philosophy and Phenomenological Research.
    In recent decades, the idea has become common that so-called virtue ethics constitutes a third option in ethics in addition to consequentialism and deontology. This paper argues that, if we understand ethical theories as accounts of right and wrong action, this is not so. Virtue ethics turns out to be a form of deontology (that is, non-consequentialism). The paper then moves to consider the Aristotelian distinction between right or virtuous action on the one hand, and acting rightly or virtuously on (...)
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  3. Roger Crisp (forthcoming). Raz on Well-Being. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 17 (3):499-516.
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  4. Roger Crisp (2014). Moral Testimony Pessimism: A Defence. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 88 (1):129-143.
    This paper defends moral testimony pessimism, the view that there is something morally or epistemically regrettable about relying on the moral testimony of others, against several arguments in Lillehammer (2014). One central such argument is that reliance on testimony is inconsistent with the exercise of true practical wisdom. Lillehammer doubts whether such reliance is always objectionable, but it is important to note that moral testimony pessimism is best understood as a view about the pro tanto, rather than the overall, badness (...)
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  5. Roger Crisp (2014). Taking Stock of Utilitarianism. Utilitas 26 (3):231-249.
    This article is an attempt to take an overview of the current position of utilitarian theory. It begins by providing a definition of utilitarianism as it is found in the works of Bentham, Mill and Sidgwick. These authors are all interpreted as intuitionists. It is claimed that the main rivals to utilitarianism are egoism on the one hand, and reflective non-egoistic pluralism, as found in the work of Ross, on the other. The significance of disagreement between proponents of these views (...)
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  6. Roger Crisp (2013). Are Egoism and Consequentialism Self-Refuting? In David Bakhurst, Margaret Olivia Little & Brad Hooker (eds.), Thinking About Reasons: Themes From the Philosophy of Jonathan Dancy. Oxford University Press. 97.
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  7. Roger Crisp (2013). Commentary: Value-Based Practice by a Different Route. In K. W. M. Fulford (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy and Psychiatry. Oxford University Press. 411.
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  8. Roger Crisp (2013). Finnis on Well-Being. In John Keown & Robert P. George (eds.), Reason, Morality, and Law: The Philosophy of John Finnis. Oxford University Press. 24.
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  9. Roger Crisp (2013). Homeric Ethics. In , The Oxford Handbook of the History of Ethics. Oxford University Press.
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  10. Roger Crisp (2013). In Defence of Absolute Goodness. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 87 (2):476-482.
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  11. Roger Crisp (2013). Metaphysics, Epistemology, Utilitarianism, Intuitionism, and Egoism: A Response to Phillips on Sidgwick. Revue D’Études Benthamiennes 12.
    The shape of contemporary ethics owes a great deal to Henry Sidgwick, through his influence on Rawls, Parfit, and others. No one who reads David Phillips’s outstanding book can be left in the slightest doubt about Sidgwick’s continuing significance for both metaethics and normative ethics. Phillips’s scholarship and his substantive arguments are powerful and insightful, and I find them largely persuasive. So in these remarks I intend merely to raise a few questions about each of his four main..
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  12. Roger Crisp (2013). Self—Refuting? In David Bakhurst, Margaret Olivia Little & Brad Hooker (eds.), Thinking About Reasons: Themes From the Philosophy of Jonathan Dancy. Oxford University Press. 97.
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  13. Roger Crisp (ed.) (2013). The Oxford Handbook of the History of Ethics. Oxford University Press.
    This original and comprehensive volume explores the history of philosophical ethics in the western tradition from Homer until the present day.
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  14. Roger Crisp, Well-Being. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  15. Roger Crisp (2011). In Defence of the Priority View: A Response to Otsuka and Voorhoeve. Utilitas 23 (1):105-108.
  16. Roger Crisp (2011). Pleasure and Hedonism in Sidgwick. In Thomas Hurka (ed.), Underivative Duty: British Moral Philosophers From Sidgwick to Ewing. Oup Oxford.
  17. Roger Crisp (2011). Sidgwick. Philosophical Forum 42 (3):323-325.
     
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  18. Roger Crisp (2010). Ethics and International Environmental Law. In Samantha Besson & John Tasioulas (eds.), The Philosophy of International Law. Oup Oxford.
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  19. Roger Crisp (2010). Virtue Ethics and Virtue Epistemology. Metaphilosophy 41 (1):22-40.
    The aim of this essay is to test the claim that epistemologists—virtue epistemologists in particular—have much to learn from virtue ethics. The essay begins with an outline of virtue ethics itself. This section concludes that a pure form of virtue ethics is likely to be unattractive, so the virtue epistemologist should examine the "impure" views of real philosophers. Aristotle is usually held up as the paradigm virtue ethicist. His doctrine of the mean is described, and it is explained how that (...)
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  20. Roger Crisp, Derek Matravers, Lilli Alanen, Michael Martin, Veronique Munoz-Darde, Johannes Brandl, Bernard Rohrmoser, Françoise Dastur, Felix Ó Murchadha & Georg Sans (2010). Visiting Professors From Abroad. Review of Metaphysics 64:231-238.
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  21. Miriam Cohen Christofidis, Roger Crisp, Avner de-Shalit, Simon Duffy, Ronald Dworkin, Alon Harel, John Harris, W. D. Hart, Dan Hausman & Richard Hull (2009). Jonathan Wolff. In Kimberley Brownlee & Adam Cureton (eds.), Disability and Disadvantage. Oxford University Press.
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  22. Roger Crisp (2009). Goodness and Reasons: A Response to Stratton-Lake. Mind 118 (472):1095-1099.
    This article is a response to some of Philip Stratton-Lake’s criticisms of an earlier paper of mine in this journal, on the so-called ‘buck-passing’ account of goodness. Some elucidation is offered of the ‘wrong kind of reasons’ problem and of T. M. Scanlon’s view, and the question is raised of the role of goodness in the view outlined by Stratton-Lake.
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  23. Roger Crisp (2009). The Foundations of Humanity. In N. Ann Davis, Richard Keshen & Jeff McMahan (eds.), Ethics and Humanity: Themes From the Philosophy of Jonathan Glover. Oxford University Press.
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  24. Roger Crisp (2008). Goodness and Reasons: Accentuating the Negative. Mind 117 (466):257-265.
    This paper concerns the relation between goodness, or value, and practical reasons, and in particular the so-called ‘buck-passing’ account (BPA) of that relation recently offered by T. M. Scanlon, according to which goodness is not reason-providing but merely the higher-order property of possessing lower-order properties that provide reasons to respond in certain ways. The paper begins by briefly describing BPA and the motivation for it, noting that Scanlon now accepts that the lower-order properties in question may be evaluative. He also (...)
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  25. Roger Crisp (2008). Compassion and Beyond. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 11 (3):233 - 246.
    This paper is a discussion of the emotion of compassion or pity, and the corresponding virtue. It begins by placing the emotion of compassion in the moral conceptual landscape, and then moves to reject the currently dominant view, a version of Aristotelianism developed by Martha Nussbaum, in favour of a non-cognitive conception of compassion as a feeling. An alternative neo-Aristotelian account is then outlined. The relation of the virtue of compassion to other virtues is plotted, and some doubts sown about (...)
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  26. Roger Crisp (2008). Meaning, Morality, and Religion. In Nafsika Athanassoulis & Samantha Vice (eds.), The Moral Life: Essays in Honour of John Cottingham. Palgrave Macmillan. 167.
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  27. Gopal Sreenivasan, Sungho Choi, Harris Nover & Roger Crisp (2008). Index of MIND Vol. 117. Mind 117:468.
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  28. Roger Crisp (2007). Ethics Without Reasons? Journal of Moral Philosophy 4 (1):40-49.
    This paper is a discussion of Jonathan Dancy's book Ethics Without Principles (2004). Holism about reasons is distinguished into a weak version, which allows for invariant reasons, and a strong, which doesn't. Four problems with Dancy's arguments for strong holism are identified. (1) A plausible particularism based on it will be close to generalism. (2) Dancy rests his case on common-sense morality, without justifying it. (3) His examples are of non-ultimate reasons. (4) There are certain universal principles it is hard (...)
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  29. Roger Crisp (2007). Neutrality and Pleasure. Economics and Philosophy 23 (1):81-88.
    John Broome's ground-breaking Weighing Lives makes precise, and supplies arguments previously lacking for, several views which for centuries have been central to the utilitarian tradition. In gratitude for his enlightening arguments, I shall repay him in this paper by showing how he could make things easier for himself by denying neutrality and accepting hedonism.
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  30. Roger Crisp (2006). A distinção facto/valor. Critica.
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  31. Roger Crisp (2006). Aristotle on Greatness of Soul. In Richard Kraut (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics. Blackwell Pub.. 158--178.
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  32. Roger Crisp (2006). Hedonism Reconsidered. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 73 (3):619–645.
    This paper is a plea for hedonism to be taken more seriously. It begins by charting hedonism's decline, and suggests that this is a result of two major objections: the claim that hedonism is the 'philosophy of swine', reducing all value to a single common denominator, and Nozick's 'experience machine' objection. There follows some elucidation of the nature of hedonism, and of enjoyment in particular. Two types of theory of enjoyment are outlined-intemalism, according to which enjoyment has some special 'feeling (...)
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  33. Roger Crisp (2006). Reasons and the Good. Clarendon Press.
    In Reasons and the Good Roger Crisp answers some of the oldest questions in moral philosophy. Claiming that a fundamental issue in normative ethics is what ultimate reasons for action we might have, he argues that the best statements of such reasons will not employ moral concepts. He investigates and explains the nature of reasons themselves; his account of how we come to know them combines an intuitionist epistemology with elements of Pyrrhonist scepticism. He defends a hedonistic theory of well-being (...)
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  34. Roger Crisp (2005). Hume on Virtue, Utility, and Morality. In Stephen Mark Gardiner (ed.), Virtue Ethics, Old and New. Cornell University Press. 159--78.
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  35. Roger Crisp (2005). Value, Reasons and the Structure of Justification: How to Avoid Passing the Buck. Analysis 65 (285):80–85.
  36. Roger Crisp (2004). Does Modern Moral Philosophy Rest on a Mistake? Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 54:75-93.
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  37. Roger Crisp (2004). Pleasure is All That Matters. Think 3 (7):21-30.
    Roger Crisp asks whether hedonism is quite as bad as is often supposed.
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  38. Roger Crisp (2004). Uneasy Virtue. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 69 (1):238-240.
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  39. Roger Crisp (2003). Egalitarianism and Compassion. Ethics 114 (1):119-126.
    In "Egalitarianism Defended," Larry Temkin attempted to rebut criticisms of egalitarianism I had made in my article, "Equality, Priority, and Compassion." Temkin's response is interesting and illuminating, but, in this article, I shall claim that his arguments miss their target and that the failure of egalitarianism may have implications more serious than some have thought.
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  40. Roger Crisp (2003). Equality, Priority, and Compassion. Ethics 113 (4):745-763.
    In recent years there has been a good deal of discussion of equality’s place in the best account of distribution or distributive justice. One central question has been whether egalitarianism should give way to a principle requiring us to give priority to the worse off. In this article, I shall begin by arguing that the grounding of equality is indeed insecure and that the priority principle appears to have certain advantages over egalitarianism. But I shall then claim that the priority (...)
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  41. Roger Crisp (2003). A Defence of Philosophical Business Ethics. In William H. Shaw (ed.), Ethics at Work: Basic Readings in Business Ethics. Oxford University Press. 9--25.
     
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  42. Roger Crisp, Larry S. Temkin, Robert Sugden, Robert N. Johnson, George Klosko & Paul Hurley (2003). 10. Jacob Levy, The Multiculturalism of Fear Jacob Levy, The Multiculturalism of Fear (Pp. 891-895). Ethics 113 (4).
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  43. Roger Crisp (2002). Hume è un utilitarista? Iride 15 (2):251-262.
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  44. Roger Crisp (2002). Sidgwick and Intuitionism. In Philip Stratton-Lake (ed.), Ethical Intuitionism: Re-Evaluations. Clarendon Press.
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  45. Roger Crisp (2002). Sidgwick and the Boundaries of Intuitionism. In Philip Stratton-Lake (ed.), Ethical Intuitionism. Oxford Clarendon Press. 56--75.
     
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  46. Tony Hope, David Sprigings & Roger Crisp (2002). Two Different Points to Consider. In K. W. M. Fulford, Donna Dickenson & Thomas H. Murray (eds.), Healthcare Ethics and Human Values: An Introductory Text with Readings and Case Studies. Blackwell Publishers. 177.
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  47. Roger Crisp (2001). Utilitarianism and Accomplishment Revisited. Analysis 61 (2):162–164.
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  48. Roger Crisp (2000). E. N. Ostenfeld (Ed.): Essays on Plato's Republic. Pp. 119. Aarhus: Aarhus University Press, 1998. Cased. ISBN: 87-7288-785-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 50 (01):331-.
  49. Roger Crisp (2000). Particularizing Particularism. In Brad Hooker & Margaret Olivia Little (eds.), Moral Particularism. Oxford University Press. 23--47.
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  50. Roger Crisp (2000). Utilitarianism and Accomplishment. Analysis 60 (3):264–268.
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