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  1.  50
    Roger J. H. King (1991). Environmental Ethics and the Case for Hunting. Environmental Ethics 13 (1):59-85.
    Hunting is a complex phenomenon. l examine it from four different perspectives-animal liberation, the land ethic, primitivism, and ecofeminism-and find no moral justification for sport hunting in any of them. At the same time, however, I argue that there are theoretical flaws in each of these approaches. Animal liberationists focus too much on the individual animal and ignore the difference between domestic and wild animals. Leopold’s land ethic fails to come to terms with the self-domestication of humans. I argue that (...)
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  2.  2
    Roger J. H. King (2015). Review of Erin McKenna, Pets, People, and Pragmatism. [REVIEW] Environmental Values 24 (6):828-830.
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  3.  24
    Roger J. H. King (2000). Environmental Ethics and the Built Environment. Environmental Ethics 22 (2):115-131.
    I defend the view that the design of the built environment should be a proper part of environmental ethics. An environmentally responsible culture should be one in which citizens take responsibility for the domesticated environments in which they live, as well as for their effects on wild nature. How we build our world reveals both the possibilities in nature and our own stance toward the world. Our constructions and contrivances also objectively constrain the possibilities for the development of a human (...)
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  4.  19
    Roger J. H. King (2003). Toward an Ethics of the Domesticated Environment. Philosophy and Geography 6 (1):3 – 14.
    This essay articulates the importance of the domesticated landscape for a mature environmental ethics. Human beings are spatial beings, deeply implicated in their relationships to places, both wild and domesticated. Human identity evolves contextually through interaction with a "world." If this world obscures our perception of wild nature, it will be difficult to motivate the social and psychological will to imagine, let alone participate in, a culture that values environmentally responsible conduct. My argument is informed by a pragmatist suspicion of (...)
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  5.  6
    Roger J. H. King (2000). Environmental Ethics and the Built Environment. Environmental Ethics 22 (2):115-131.
    I defend the view that the design of the built environment should be a proper part of environmental ethics. An environmentally responsible culture should be one in which citizens take responsibility for the domesticated environments in which they live, as well as for their effects on wild nature. How we build our world reveals both the possibilities in nature and our own stance toward the world. Our constructions and contrivances also objectively constrain the possibilities for the development of a human (...)
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  6.  4
    Roger J. H. King (2005). Deliberative Democracy and the Environment. Environmental Ethics 27 (2):221-223.
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  7.  1
    Roger J. H. King (1990). How to Construe Nature: Environmental Ethics and the Interpretation of Nature. Between the Species 6 (3):3.
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  8.  7
    Roger J. H. King (2005). Deliberative Democracy and the Environment. Environmental Ethics 27 (2):221-223.
  9.  13
    Roger J. H. King (1991). Caring About Nature: Feminist Ethics and the Environment. Hypatia 6 (1):75 - 89.
    In this essay I examine the relevance of the vocabulary of an ethics of care to ecofeminism. While this vocabulary appears to offer a promising alternative to moral extensionism and deep ecology, there are problems with the use of this vocabulary by both essentialists and conceptualists. I argue that too great a reliance is placed on personal lived experience as a basis for ecofeminist ethics and that the concept of care is insufficiently determinate to explicate the meaning of care for (...)
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  10.  5
    Roger J. H. King (2003). The Place of Domesticated Spaces in Environmental Ethics. Social Philosophy Today 19:41-53.
    Environmental ethics has traditionally focused on a defense of the intrinsic value of animals and wild habitats. However, this ethical project needs to be supplemented by a consideration of the kind of culture that can take such an ethical point of view seriously. This essay argues that one component of an environmentally responsible culture is its domesticated environment. How we construct the domesticated environment has an impact on our perception of our own identities and our relations to wild nature. If (...)
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  11.  2
    Roger J. H. King (1991). Relativism and Moral Critique. Social Philosophy Today 5:145-163.
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  12.  15
    Roger J. H. King (2006). Playing with Boundaries: Critical Reflections on Strategies for an Environmental Culture and the Promise of Civic Environmentalism. Ethics, Place and Environment 9 (2):173 – 186.
    This essay reflects on three strategic visions of how society might develop in the direction of a more environmentally responsible culture. These strategies - green technology, ecocentrism, and civic environmentalism - offer promising elements of what we need. However, each fails in different ways to successfully explain how citizens, caught up in consumerist practices and their supporting belief systems, can be led to take the transformative steps needed to build a culture that engages responsibly and respectfully with the natural environment. (...)
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  13.  8
    Gregg Horowitz & Roger J. H. King (1996). Honi Fern Haber 1958-1995. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 69 (5):126 - 127.
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  14.  6
    Roger J. H. King (2011). The Ethics of Metropolitan Growth. Environmental Ethics 33 (1):99-100.
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  15.  4
    Roger J. H. King (1991). Utopian Fiction as Moral Philosophy; Imagination and Critique. Utopian Studies 3:72-78.
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  16.  5
    Roger J. H. King (2001). Virtue and Community in Business Ethics: A Critical Assessment of Solomon's Aristotelian Approach to Social Responsibility. Journal of Social Philosophy 32 (4):487–499.
  17.  3
    Roger J. H. King (1991). Keeping Ideology Political. Social Epistemology 5 (3):177 – 185.
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  18.  2
    Roger J. H. King (2000). Defining Literacy in a Time of Environmental Crisis. Journal of Social Philosophy 31 (1):68–81.
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  19. Roger J. H. King (2013). Anthony Karvonen. Politics of Urban Runoff: Nature, Technology, and the Sustainable City. Environmental Ethics 35 (3):363-366.
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  20. Roger J. H. King (2014). Consumption and Its Consequences by Daniel Miller. Environmental Ethics 36 (3):377-378.
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