Search results for 'Roger S. Taylor' (try it on Scholar)

994 found
Sort by:
  1. A. M. Bodkin, A. C. Ewing, F. C. S. Schiller, A. E. Taylor, S. S., C. A. Mace & John Laird (1926). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 35 (138):246-257.score: 2799.9
    No categories
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. F. C. S. Schiller, Michael B. Foster, A. C. Ewing, W. D. Lamont, E. S. Waterhouse, A. E. Taylor, W. D. Ross, T. E. Jessop, C. D. Broad, S. S. & O. de Selincourt (1929). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 38 (151):377-398.score: 2799.9
    No categories
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. F. C. S. Schiller, A. E. Taylor, R. Latta, W. Leslie Mackenzie, E. F. Stevenson & M. S. (1899). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 8 (30):261-277.score: 2799.9
    No categories
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. J. N. Wright, A. E. Taylor, John Laird, S. R., F. C. S. Schiller, H. F. Hallett, J. L. Russell, S. S., A. C. Ewing, O. de Selincourt, E. J. Thomas & R. J. (1927). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 36 (144):500-524.score: 2400.0
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. H. F. Hallett, John Laird, Norman Kemp Smith, J. H. Woodger, S. S., F. C. S. Schiller, J. H. Muirhead, A. E. Taylor, A. C. Ewing & Rex Knight (1930). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 39 (154):236-262.score: 2400.0
    No categories
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. W. D. Lamont, A. E. Taylor, T. E. Jessop, John Laird, W. J. H. Sprott, T. Whittaker, S. S., O. de Selincourt & Ernst Harms (1933). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 42 (165):101-125.score: 2400.0
    No categories
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. B. C., A. E. Taylor, P. V. M. Benecke, E. Prideaux, W. Whately Smith, James Drever, S. S., L. J. Russell, Bernard Bosanquet, I. A. Richards, James Linsay, V. W., M. B., S. W., C. E., M. L., B. D. & S. S. (1921). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 30 (120):468-493.score: 2400.0
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. C. S. Taylor (1980). Reviews : Charles S. Taylor -- Paulo Freire's Pedagogu in Guinea-Bissau. Philosophy and Social Criticism 7 (2):216-225.score: 1080.0
  9. Roger S. Taylor & Michel Ferrari (eds.) (2010). Epistemology and Science Education: Understanding the Evolution Vs. Intelligent Design Controversy. Routledge.score: 870.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Roger S. Taylor & Michel Ferrari (eds.) (2011). Epistemology and Science Education: Understanding the Evolution Vs. Routledge.score: 870.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. A. C. F. Beales, Robert M. Povey, Gordon R. Cross, Kenneth Garside, Roger R. Straughan, R. S. Peters, W. B. Inglis, Helen Coppen, David Johnston, P. H. Taylor, M. F. Cleugh, Charles Gittins, J. V. Muir & Evelyn E. Cowie (1970). Short Notice. British Journal of Educational Studies 18 (3):276-355.score: 810.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. A. E. Taylor (1929). Professor Taylor's Reply. Philosophy 4 (15):433-.score: 780.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Charles Taylor (1980). Taylor's Comments. Rorty, Taylor, and Dreyfus: A Discussion. Review of Metaphysics 34 (1):47-55.score: 780.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Robert S. Taylor (2010). Kant's Political Religion: The Transparency of Perpetual Peace and the Highest Good. Review of Politics 72 (1):1-24.score: 480.0
    Scholars have long debated the relationship between Kant’s doctrine of right and his doctrine of virtue (including his moral religion or ethico-theology), which are the two branches of his moral philosophy. This article will examine the intimate connection in his practical philosophy between perpetual peace and the highest good, between political and ethico-religious communities, and between the types of transparency peculiar to each. It will show how domestic and international right provides a framework for the development of ethical communities, including (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Robert S. Taylor (2012). The Progress of Absolutism in Kant's Essay What is Enlightenment? In Elisabeth Ellis (ed.), Kant's Political Theory: Interpretations and Applications. Pennsylvania State University Press.score: 480.0
  16. Robert S. Taylor (2006). Democratic Transitions and the Progress of Absolutism in Kant's Political Thought. Journal of Politics 68 (3):556-570.score: 480.0
    Against several recent interpretations, I argue in this paper that Immanuel Kant's support for enlightened absolutism was a permanent feature of his political thought that fit comfortably within his larger philosophy, though he saw such rule as part of a transition to democratic self-government initiated by the absolute monarch himself. I support these contentions with (1) a detailed exegesis of Kant’s essay "What is Enlightenment?" (2) an argument that Kantian republicanism requires not merely a separation of powers but also a (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. David McPherson & Charles Taylor (2012). Re-Enchanting the World: An Interview with Charles Taylor. Philosophy and Theology 24 (2):275-294.score: 480.0
    This interview with Charles Taylor explores a central concern throughout his work, viz., his concern to confront the challenges presented by the process of ‘disenchantment’ in the modern world. It focuses especially on what is involved in seeking a kind of ‘re-enchantment.' A key issue that is discussed is the relationship of Taylor’s theism to his effort of seeking re-enchantment. Some other related issues that are explored pertain to questions surrounding Taylor’s argument against the standard secularization thesis (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Charles Taylor (2004). Charles Taylor. Ethics 112 (1).score: 480.0
    Charles Taylor is one of the most distinctive figures in the landscape of contemporary philosophy. His ability to contribute to philosophical conversations across a wide spectrum of ideas is especially impressive in a time of increasing specialization. These areas include moral theory, theories of subjectivity, political theory, epistemology, hermeneutics, philosophy of mind, philosophy of language and aesthetics. Most recently, Taylor has branched into the study of religion. Written by a team of international authorities, this collection will be read (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Christiane Bailey & Chloë Taylor (2013). Editor's Introduction. Phaenex. Journal of Existential and Phenomenological Theory and Culture 8 (2):i-xv.score: 480.0
    Christiane Bailey and Chloë Taylor (Editorial Introduction) Sue Donaldson (Stirring the Pot - A short play in six scenes) Ralph Acampora (La diversification de la recherche en éthique animale et en études animales) Eva Giraud (Veganism as Affirmative Biopolitics: Moving Towards a Posthumanist Ethics?) Leonard Lawlor (The Flipside of Violence, or Beyond the Thought of Good Enough) Kelly Struthers Montford (The “Present Referent”: Nonhuman Animal Sacrifice and the Constitution of Dominant Albertan Identity) James Stanescu (Beyond Biopolitics: Animal Studies, Factory (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. P. J. Taylor (1983). Consent, Competency and ECT: A Psychiatrist's View. Journal of Medical Ethics 9 (3):146-151.score: 480.0
    Dr Taylor, an English psychiatrist, considers the issue of the symposium in the context of the Mental Health (Amendment) Act 1982. This, she says, gives little guidance on how judgment of a patient's competency or capability to consent to treatment should be made, although it specifies that unless compulsorily detained patients competently consent to ECT a special second medical opinion is required. Although some guidelines from the Department of Health may be offered before implementation of the Act in September (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Charles Taylor, James Tully & Daniel M. Weinstock (eds.) (1994). Philosophy in an Age of Pluralism: The Philosophy of Charles Taylor in Question. Cambridge University Press.score: 480.0
    This is the first comprehensive evaluation of Charles Taylor's work and a major contribution to leading questions in philosophy and the human sciences as they face an increasingly pluralistic age. Charles Taylor is one of the most influential contemporary moral and political philosophers: in an era of specialisation he is one of the few thinkers who has developed a comprehensive philosophy which speaks to the conditions of the modern world in a way that is compelling to specialists in (...)
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Thomas Taylor (1969). Thomas Taylor the Platonist: Selected Writings. London, Routledge & K. Paul.score: 480.0
    Thomas Taylor in England, by K. Raine.--Thomas Taylor in America, by G. M. Harper.--Biographical accounts of Thomas Taylor.--Concerning the beautiful.--The hymns of Orpheus.--Concerning the cave of the nymphs.--A dissertation on the Eleusinian and Bacchic mysteries.--Introduction to The fable of Cupid and Psyche.--The Platonic philosopher's creed.--An apology for the fables of Homer.--Bibliography (p. [521]-538).
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Robert S. Taylor (2003). Rawls’s Defense of the Priority of Liberty: A Kantian Reconstruction. Philosophy and Public Affairs 31 (3):246–271.score: 420.0
    Rawls offers three arguments for the priority of liberty in Theory, two of which share a common error: the belief that once we have shown the instrumental value of the basic liberties for some essential purpose (e.g., securing self-respect), we have automatically shown the reason for their lexical priority. The third argument, however, does not share this error and can be reconstructed along Kantian lines: beginning with the Kantian conception of autonomy endorsed by Rawls in section 40 of Theory, we (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Laureano Luna & William Taylor (2010). Cantor's Proof in the Full Definable Universe. Australasian Journal of Logic 9:11-25.score: 420.0
    Cantor’s proof that the powerset of the set of all natural numbers is uncountable yields a version of Richard’s paradox when restricted to the full definable universe, that is, to the universe containing all objects that can be defined not just in one formal language but by means of the full expressive power of natural language: this universe seems to be countable on one account and uncountable on another. We argue that the claim that definitional contexts impose restrictions on the (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Patrick L. Taylor (2005). The Gap Between Law and Ethics in Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research: Overcoming the Effect of U.S. Federal Policy on Research Advances and Public Benefit. Science and Engineering Ethics 11 (4):589-616.score: 420.0
    Key ethical issues arise in association with the conduct of stem cell research by research institutions in the United States. These ethical issues, summarized in detail, receive no adequate translation into federal laws or regulations, also described in this article. U.S. Federal policy takes a passive approach to these ethical issues, translating them simply into limitations on taxpayer funding, and foregoes scientific and ethical leadership while protecting intellectual property interests through a laissez faire approach to stem cell patents and licenses. (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. J. S. Taylor (2007). A "Queen of Hearts" Trial of Organ Markets: Why Scheper-Hughes's Objections to Markets in Human Organs Fail. Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (4):201-204.score: 420.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. M. Taylor, P. Perakakis, V. Trachana & S. Gialis (2014). Rankings Are the Sorcerer's New Apprentice. Ethics in Science and Environmental Politics 13 (2):73-99.score: 420.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. L. J. Taylor & S. Lev Ari (2009). Action in Cognition: The Case of Language. Language and Cognition, 1, 45-58. Taylor, LJ & Zwaan, RA (2008). Motor Resonance and Linguistic. [REVIEW] Cognition 115:39-45.score: 420.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Tim Barnett, Daniel S. Cochran & G. Stephen Taylor (1993). The Internal Disclosure Policies of Private-Sector Employers: An Initial Look at Their Relationship to Employee Whistleblowing. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 12 (2):127 - 136.score: 340.0
    Whistleblowers have usually been treated as outcasts by private-sector employers. But legal, ethical, and practical considerations increasingly compel companies to encourage employees to disclose suspected illegal and/or unethical activities throughinternal communication channels. Internal disclosure policies/procedures (IDPP''s) have been recommended as one way to encourage such communication.This study examined the relationship between IDPP''s and employee whistleblowing among private-sector employers. Almost 300 human resources executives provided data concerning their organizations'' experiences.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Robert S. Taylor (2004). A Kantian Defense of Self-Ownership. Journal of Political Philosophy 12 (1):65–78.score: 300.0
    Many scholars, including G. A. Cohen, Daniel Attas, and George Brenkert, have denied that a Kantian defense of self-ownership is possible. Kant's ostensible hostility to self-ownership can be resolved, however, upon reexamination of the Groundwork and the Metaphysics of Morals. Moreover, two novel Kantian defenses of self-ownership (narrowly construed) can be devised. The first shows that maxims of exploitation and paternalism that violate self-ownership cannot be universalized, as this leads to contradictions in conception. The second shows that physical coercion against (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Bernard J. Baars, J. B. Newman & John G. Taylor (1998). Neuronal Mechanisms of Consciousness: A Relational Global Workspace Approach. In Stuart R. Hameroff, Alfred W. Kaszniak & A.C. Scott (eds.), Toward a Science of Consciousness II. MIT Press. 269-278.score: 300.0
    This paper explores a remarkable convergence of ideas and evidence, previously presented in separate places by its authors. That convergence has now become so persuasive that we believe we are working within substantially the same broad framework. Taylor's mathematical papers on neuronal systems involved in consciousness dovetail well with work by Newman and Baars on the thalamocortical system, suggesting a brain mechanism much like the global workspace architecture developed by Baars (see references below). This architecture is relational, in the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Robert S. Taylor (2009). Rawlsian Affirmative Action. Ethics 119 (3):476-506.score: 300.0
    My paper addresses a topic--the implications of Rawls's justice as fairness for affirmative action--that has received remarkably little attention from Rawls's major interpreters. The only extended treatments of it that are in print are over a quarter-century old, and they bear scarcely any relationship to Rawls's own nonideal theorizing. Following Christine Korsgaard's lead, I work through the implications of Rawls's nonideal theory and show what it entails for affirmative action: viz. that under nonideal conditions, aggressive forms of formal equality of (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Robert S. Taylor (2005). Kantian Personal Autonomy. Political Theory 33 (5):602-628.score: 300.0
    Jeremy Waldron has recently raised the question of whether there is anything approximating the creative self-authorship of personal autonomy in the writings of Immanuel Kant. After considering the possibility that Kantian prudential reasoning might serve as a conception of personal autonomy, I argue that the elements of a more suitable conception can be found in Kant’s Tugendlehre or Doctrine of Virtue--specifically, in the imperfect duties of self-perfection and the practical love of others. This discovery is important for at least three (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Robert S. Taylor (2012). Hate Speech, the Priority of Liberty, and the Temptations of Nonideal Theory. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 15 (3):353-68.score: 300.0
    Are government restrictions on hate speech consistent with the priority of liberty? This relatively narrow policy question will serve as the starting point for a wider discussion of the use and abuse of nonideal theory in contemporary political philosophy, especially as practiced on the academic left. I begin by showing that hate speech (understood as group libel) can undermine fair equality of opportunity for historically-oppressed groups but that the priority of liberty seems to forbid its restriction. This tension between free (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Robert S. Taylor (2004). Self-Realization and the Priority of Fair Equality of Opportunity. Journal of Moral Philosophy 1 (3):333-347.score: 300.0
    The lexical priority of fair equality of opportunity in John Rawls’s justice as fairness, which has been sharply criticized by Larry Alexander and Richard Arneson among others, is left almost entirely undefended in Rawls’s works. I argue here that this priority rule can be successfully defended against its critics despite Rawls’s own doubts about it. Using the few textual clues he provides, I speculatively reconstruct his defense of this rule, showing that it can be grounded on our interest in self-realization (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. C. Taylor & Daniel C. Dennett (2002). Who's Afraid of Determinism? Rethinking Causes and Possibilities. In Robert H. Kane (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Free Will. Oxford University Press. 257--277.score: 300.0
    Incompatibilism, the view that free will and determinism are incompatible, subsists on two widely accepted, but deeply confused, theses concerning possibility and causation: (1) in a deterministic universe, one can never truthfully utter the sentence "I could have done otherwise," and (2) in such universes, one can never really take credit for having caused an event, since in fact all events have been predetermined by conditions during the universe's birth. Throughout the free will.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Robert S. Taylor (2011). Reconstructing Rawls: The Kantian Foundations of Justice as Fairness. Penn State University Press.score: 300.0
    With the publication of A Theory of Justice in 1971, John Rawls not only rejuvenated contemporary political philosophy but also defended a Kantian form of Enlightenment liberalism called “justice as fairness.” Enlightenment liberalism stresses the development and exercise of our capacity for autonomy, while Reformation liberalism emphasizes diversity and the toleration that encourages it. These two strands of liberalism are often mutually supporting, but they conflict in a surprising number of cases, whether over the accommodation of group difference, the design (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Yvonne Chiu & Robert S. Taylor (2011). The Self-Extinguishing Despot: Millian Democratization, or The Autophagous Autocrat. Journal of Politics 73 (4):1239-50.score: 300.0
    Although there is no more iconic, stalwart, and eloquent defender of liberty and representative democracy than J.S. Mill, he sometimes endorses non-democratic forms of governance. This article explains the reasons behind this seeming aberration and shows that Mill actually has complex and nuanced views of the transition from non-democratic to democratic government, including the comprehensive and parallel material, cultural, institutional, and character reforms that must occur, and the mechanism by which they will be enacted. Namely, an enlightened despot must cultivate (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Barry Taylor (2006). Models, Truth, and Realism. Oxford University Press.score: 300.0
    Barry Taylor's book mounts a major new argument against one of the fundamental tenets of much contemporary philosophy, the idea that we can make sense of reality as existing objectively, independently of our capacities to come to know it. He concludes that there is no defensible notion of truth which preserves the theses of traditional realism, nor any extant position sufficiently true to the ideals of that doctrine to inherit its title. In presenting his case Taylor engages with (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Robert S. Taylor (forthcoming). Religious Conservatives and Safe Sex: Reconciliation by Nonpublic Reason. American Political Thought 3 (2).score: 300.0
    Religious conservatives in the U.S. have frequently opposed public-health measures designed to combat STDs among minors, such as sex education, condom distribution, and HPV vaccination. Using Rawls’s method of conjecture, I will clear up what I take to be a misunderstanding on the part of religious conservatives: even if we grant their premises regarding the nature and source of sexual norms, the wide-ranging authority of parents to enforce these norms against their minor children, and the potential sexual-disinhibition effects of the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Robert S. Taylor (2014). Illiberal Socialism. Social Theory and Practice 40 (3):433-460.score: 300.0
    Is “liberal socialism” an oxymoron? Not quite, but I will demonstrate here that it is a much more unstable and uncommon hybrid than scholars had previously thought and that almost all liberals should reject socialism, even in its most attractive form. More specifically, I will show that three leading varieties of liberalism—neutralist, plural-perfectionist, and deliberative-democratic—are incompatible with even a moderate form of socialism, viz., associational market socialism. My paper will also cast grave doubt on Rawls’s belief that justice as fairness (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. C. C. W. Taylor (1978). Berkeley's Theory of Abstract Ideas. Philosophical Quarterly 28 (111):97-115.score: 300.0
    While claiming to refute locke's theory of abstract ideas, Berkeley himself accepts a form of abstractionism. Locke's account of abstraction is indeterminate between two doctrines: 1) abstract ideas are representations of paradigm instances of kinds, 2) abstract ideas are schematic representations of the defining features of kinds. Berkeley's arguments are directed exclusively against 2, And refute only a specific version of it, Which there is no reason to ascribe to locke; berkeley himself accepts abstract ideas of the former type. Locke's (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Peter J. Taylor & Ann S. Blum (1991). Ecosystem as Circuits: Diagrams and the Limits of Physical Analogies. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 6 (2):275-294.score: 300.0
    Diagrams refer to the phenomena overtly represented, to analogous phenomena, and to previous pictures and their graphic conventions. The diagrams of ecologists Clarke, Hutchinson, and H.T. Odum reveal their search for physical analogies, building on the success of World War II science and the promise of cybernetics. H.T. Odum's energy circuit diagrams reveal also his aspirations for a universal and natural means of reducing complexity to guide the management of diverse ecological and social systems. Graphic conventions concerning framing and translation (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Andrew M. Pitts & Paul Taylor (1989). A Note on Russell's Paradox in Locally Cartesian Closed Categories. Studia Logica 48 (3):377 - 387.score: 300.0
    Working in the fragment of Martin-Löfs extensional type theory [12] which has products (but not sums) of dependent types, we consider two additional assumptions: firstly, that there are (strong) equality types; and secondly, that there is a type which is universal in the sense that terms of that type name all types, up to isomorphism. For such a type theory, we give a version of Russell's paradox showing that each type possesses a closed term and (hence) that all terms of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Charles Taylor (1975). Hegel. Cambridge University Press.score: 300.0
    This is a major and comprehensive study of the philosophy of Hegel, his place in the history of ideas, and his continuing relevance and importance. Professor Taylor relates Hegel to the earlier history of philosophy and, more particularly, to the central intellectual and spiritual issues of his own time. He engages with Hegel sympathetically, on Hegel's own terms and, as the subject demands, in detail. This important book is now reissued with a fresh new cover.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Brendan Cantwell & Barrett J. Taylor (2013). Global Status, Intra-Institutional Stratification and Organizational Segmentation: A Time-Dynamic Tobit Analysis of ARWU Position Among U.S. Universities. Minerva 51 (2):195-223.score: 300.0
    Ranking systems such as The Times Higher Education’s World University Rankings and Shanghai Jiao Tong University’s Academic Rankings of World Universities simultaneously mark global status and stimulate global academic competition. As international ranking systems have become more prominent, researchers have begun to examine whether global rankings are creating increased inequality within and between universities. Using a panel Tobit regression analysis, this study assesses the extent to which markers of inter-institutional stratification and organizational segmentation predict global status among US research universities (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Joan E. Taylor (2003). Jewish Women Philosophers of First-Century Alexandria: Philo's "Therapeutae" Reconsidered. Oxford University Press.score: 300.0
    The 'Therapeutae' were a Jewish group of ascetic philosophers who lived outside Alexandria in the middle of the first century CE. They are described in Philo's treatise De Vita Contemplativa and have often been considered in comparison with early Christians, the Essenes, and the Dead Sea Scrolls. But who were they really? This study focuses particularly on issues of history, rhetoric, women, and gender in a wide exploration of the group, and comes to new conclusions about the 'Therapeutae' and their (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Mark C. Taylor (2007). After God. University of Chicago Press.score: 300.0
    With fundamentalists dominating the headlines and scientists arguing about the biological and neurological basis of faith, religion is the topic of the day. But religion, Mark C. Taylor shows, is more complicated than either its defenders or critics think and, indeed, is much more influential than any of us realize. Our world, Taylor maintains, is shaped by religion even when it is least obvious. Faith and value, he insists, are unavoidable and inextricably interrelated for believers and nonbelievers alike. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Richard C. Taylor & Max Herrera (2005). Aquinas's Naturalized Epistemology. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 79:85-102.score: 300.0
    Recently much interest has been shown in the notion of intelligible species in the thought of Thomas Aquinas. Intelligible species supposedly explain humanknowing of the world and universals. However, in some cases, the historical context and the philosophical sources employed by Aquinas have been sorely neglected. As a result, new interpretations have been set forth which needlessly obscure an already controversial and perhaps even philosophically tenuous doctrine. Using a recent article by Houston Smit as an example of a novel and (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Aaron Spital & James S. Taylor (2008). In Defense of Routine Recovery of Cadaveric Organs: A Response to Walter Glannon. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 17 (03):337-343.score: 300.0
    Walter Glannon argues that our proposal for routine recovery (also known as conscription) of transplantable cadaveric organs is unacceptable After carefully reviewing his counterarguments, we conclude that, although some of them have merit, none are sufficiently strong to warrant abandoning this plan. Below we respond to each of Glannon's concerns.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 994