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Roland E. Kidwell [8]Roland E. Kidwell Jr [2]
  1. Roland E. Kidwell, Franz W. Kellermanns & Kimberly A. Eddleston (2012). Harmony, Justice, Confusion, and Conflict in Family Firms: Implications for Ethical Climate and the “Fredo Effect”. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 106 (4):503-517.
    Family firm leaders acting as stewards of a close-knit enterprise may attempt to build a positive atmosphere of trust, clarity, and cohesiveness in the firm’s operation. Yet, conditions unique to family firms may lead some family members to develop a heightened sense of entitlement and weaker bonds to the organization. This creates conditions for a Fredo effect, where a family member’s incompetence, opportunistic behaviors, and/or ethically dubious actions can impede the firm’s success, potentially resulting in a scandal that could lead (...)
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  2. Sean Valentine, Lynn Godkin, Gary M. Fleischman, Roland E. Kidwell & Karen Page (2011). Corporate Ethical Values and Altruism: The Mediating Role of Career Satisfaction. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 101 (4):509-523.
    This study explores the ability of career satisfaction to mediate the relationship between corporate ethical values and altruism. Using a sample of individuals employed in a four-campus, regional health science center, it was determined that individual career satisfaction fully mediated the positive relationship between perceptions of corporate ethical values and self-reported altruism. The findings imply that companies dedicating attention to positive corporate ethical values can enhance employee attitudes and altruistic behaviors, especially when individuals experience a high degree of career satisfaction.
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  3. Roland E. Kidwell & Sean R. Valentine (2009). Positive Group Context, Work Attitudes, and Organizational Misbehavior: The Case of Withholding Job Effort. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 86 (1):15 - 28.
    Considering the organization’s ethical context as a framework to investigate workplace phenomena, this field study of military reserve personnel examines the relationships among perceptions of psychosocial group variables, such as cohesiveness, helping behavior and peer leadership, employee job attitudes, and the likelihood of individuals’ withholding on-the-job effort, a form of organizational misbehavior. Hypotheses were tested with a sample of 290 individuals using structural equation modeling, and support for negative relationships between perceptions of positive group context and withholding effort by individual (...)
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  4. Linda A. Kidwell & Roland E. Kidwell (2008). Do the Numbers Add Up to Different Views? Perceptions of Ethical Faculty Behavior Among Faculty in Quantitative Versus Qualitative Disciplines. Journal of Business Ethics 78 (1-2):141 - 151.
    Faculty across a wide range of academic disciplines at 89 AASCB-accredited U.S. business schools were surveyed regarding their perceptions of the ethical nature of faculty behaviors related to undergraduate course content, student evaluation, educational environment, research issues, financial and material transactions, and social and sexual relationships. We analyzed responses based on whether instruction in the academic discipline focused mainly on quantitative topics or largely on qualitative issues. Faculty who represented quantitative disciplines such as accounting and finance (n = 383) were (...)
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  5. Roland E. Kidwell Jr (2004). "Small" Lies, Big Trouble: The Unfortunate Consequences of Résumé Padding, From Janet Cooke to George O'Leary. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 51 (2):175 - 184.
    Lying and dysfunctional impression management have been identified as two serious forms of deviant behavior in organizations. One manifestation of such behavior is distortion of one's résumé. In 1981, Janet Cooke lost American journalism's highest honor, the Pulitzer Prize, and her job when her work was exposed as a hoax. The revelation surfaced after it was discovered that she had lied on her résumé and her biographical record. Twenty years later, football coach George O'Leary resigned from one of the most (...)
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  6. Roland E. Kidwell (2004). “Small” Lies, Big Trouble: The Unfortunate Consequences of Résumé Padding, From Janet Cooke to George O'Leary. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 51 (2):175 - 184.
    Lying and dysfunctional impression management have been identified as two serious forms of deviant behavior in organizations. One manifestation of such behavior is distortion of one's résumé. In 1981, Janet Cooke lost American journalism's highest honor, the Pulitzer Prize, and her job when her work was exposed as a hoax. The revelation surfaced after it was discovered that she had lied on her résumé and her biographical record. Twenty years later, football coach George O'Leary resigned from one of the (...)
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  7. Chet Robie, Roland E. Kidwell Jr & James A. Kling (2003). The Ethics of Professorial Book Selling: Morality, Money and "Black Market" Books. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 47 (2):61 - 76.
    This study used experimental and correlational techniques to examine perceptions that university faculty hold regarding the practice of professorial selling of examination textbooks to wholesalers. Faculty members (n = 236) from 14 universities and community colleges and a wide variety of academic disciplines responded to a web-based survey. We presented hypothetical selling situations to respondents with manipulated variables consisting of solicitation status (unsolicited versus solicited) and use of money (for faculty or for student activities). Both main effects and the interaction (...)
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  8. Chet Robie & Roland E. Kidwell (2003). The “Ethical” Professor and the Undergraduate Student: Current Perceptions of Moral Behavior Among Business School Faculty. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 1 (2):153-173.
    A survey of 830 faculty members at 89 AASCB-accredited business schools throughout the United States was conducted in Fall 2002 to develop a snapshot of perceptions of ethical and unethical conduct with regard to undergraduate business instruction across a wide range of business disciplines. These behaviors fell into such categories as course content, evaluation of students, educational environment, disrespectful behavior, research and publication issues, financial and material transactions, social relationships with students, and sexual relationships with students and other faculty. Of (...)
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  9. Roland E. Kidwell & Philip M. Scherer (2001). Layoffs and Their Ethical Implications Under Scientific Management, Quality Management and Open-Book Management. Journal of Business Ethics 29 (1-2):113 - 124.
    Two major management philosophies of the 20th Century, scientific management and quality management, are often contrasted. Scientific management is seen as a system that focuses on task efficiencies whereas quality management is described as a collaborative, people-centered process approach to continuous improvement. This paper examines the ethical implications of these diverse approaches, particularly in the way information is used to decide which employees to lay off in times of economic difficulty. The paper uses case examples of quality management as teaching (...)
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