Search results for 'Romanticism' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Early German Romanticism (2005). Avital, Tsion. Art Versus Nonart: Art Out of Mind. Cambridge UP 2003. Pp. 445. 11 Colour Plates. 15 B&W Figures. Hardback£ 65.00. Bates, Jennifer Ann. Hegel's Theory of Imagi. [REVIEW] British Journal of Aesthetics 45 (2).score: 30.0
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  2. Aspiring Beyond & French Romanticism (2009). Victor Kocay. In Anna-Teresa Tymieniecka (ed.), Existence, Historical Fabulation, Destiny. Springer Verlag. 99--361.score: 30.0
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  3. Johann Gottfried Herder & German Romanticism (1999). Ingeborg Baumgartner. In Tm Powers & P. Kamolnick (ed.), From Kant to Weber: Freedom and Culture in Classical German Social Theory.score: 30.0
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  4. Serbian Music Romanticism (2003). Tatjana Markovic. In Eero Tarasti, Paul Forsell & Richard Littlefield (eds.), Musical Semiotics Revisited. International Semiotics Institute. 468.score: 30.0
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  5. Stanley Cavell (1988). In Quest of the Ordinary: Lines of Skepticism and Romanticism. University of Chicago Press.score: 24.0
    These lectures by one of the most influential and original philosophers of the twentieth century constitute a sustained argument for the philosophical basis of romanticism, particularly in its American rendering. Through his examination of such authors as Emerson, Thoreau, Poe, Wordsworth, and Coleridge, Stanley Cavell shows that romanticism and American transcendentalism represent a serious philosophical response to the challenge of skepticism that underlies the writings of Wittgenstein and Austin on ordinary language.
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  6. Nikolas Kompridis (ed.) (2006). Philosophical Romanticism. Routledge.score: 24.0
    Philosophical Romanticism is one of the first books to address the relationship between philosophy and romanticism, an area which is currently undergoing a major revival. This collection of specially-written articles by world-class philosophers explores the contribution of romantic thought to topics such as freedom, autonomy and subjectivity; memory and imagination; pluralism and practical reason; modernism, scepticism and irony; art and ethics; and cosmology, time and technology. While the roots of romanticism are to be found in early German (...)
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  7. Patricia A. Ward (1980). Joseph Joubert and the Critical Tradition: Platonism and Romanticism. Droz.score: 24.0
    WARD Joseph Joubert and the Critical Tradition Platonism and Romanticism LIBRAIRIE DROZ SA 11, rue Massot GENEVE 1980 ...
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  8. Richard Thomas Eldridge (2001). The Persistence of Romanticism: Essays in Philosophy and Literature. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    These challenging essays defend Romanticism against its critics. They argue that Romantic thought, interpreted as the pursuit of freedom in concrete contexts, remains a central and exemplary form of both artistic work and philosophical understanding. Marshalling a wide range of texts from literature, philosophy and criticism, Richard Eldridge traces the central themes and stylistic features of Romantic thinking in the work of Kant, Hölderlin, Wordsworth, Hardy, Wittgenstein, Cavell and Updike. Through his analysis he shows that Romanticism is neither (...)
     
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  9. Dalia Nassar (ed.) (2014). The Relevance of Romanticism: Essays on German Romantic Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    Since the early 1990s, there has been a resurgence of interest in philosophy between “Kant and Hegel,” and in early German romanticism in particular. Philosophers have come to recognize that, in spite of significant differences between the contemporary and romantic contexts, romanticism continues to “persist,” and the questions which the Romantics raised remain relevant today. The Relevance of Romanticism: Essays on Early German Romantic Philosophy is the first collection of essays that offers an in-depth analysis of the (...)
     
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  10. Vanessa Sage (2009). Encountering the Wilderness, Encountering the Mist: Nature, Romanticism, and Contemporary Paganism. Anthropology of Consciousness 20 (1):27-52.score: 21.0
    This article asks how ideas about nature in the 18th and 19th century Romantic movement have traveled in and been translated by the various religious groups that constitute contemporary Paganism. Drawing on the work of poets, philosophers, historians, social scientists, and contemporary Pagans themselves, the article argues that contemporary Paganism borrows freely from Romantic notions of inspiration and imagination to craft a vision of nature, that, for them, responds to the emotional and political needs of their own time and place. (...)
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  11. Daniel Breazeale & Tom Rockmore (eds.) (2010). Fichte, German Idealism, and Early Romanticism. Rodopi.score: 21.0
    This volume of 23 previously unpublished essays explores the relationship between the philosophy of J.G. Fichte and that of other leading thinkers associated ...
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  12. Richard Thomas Eldridge (1997). Leading a Human Life: Wittgenstein, Intentionality, and Romanticism. University of Chicago Press.score: 21.0
    In this provocative new study, Richard Eldridge presents a highly original and compelling account of Wittgenstein's Philosophical Investigations , one of the most enduring yet enigmatic works of the twentieth century. He does so by reading the text as a dramatization of what is perhaps life's central motivating struggle--the inescapable human need to pursue an ideal of expressive freedom within the difficult terms set by culture. Eldridge sees Wittgenstein as a Romantic protagonist, engaged in an ongoing internal dialogue over the (...)
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  13. Alison Stone (2014). Alienation From Nature and Early German Romanticism. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 17 (1):41-54.score: 21.0
    In this article I ask how fruitful the concept of alienation can be for thinking critically about the nature and causes of the contemporary environmental crisis. The concept of alienation enables us to claim that modern human beings have become alienated or estranged from nature and need to become reconciled with it. Yet reconciliation has often been understood—notably by Hegel and Marx—as the state of being ‘at-home-with-oneself-in-the-world’, in the name of which we are entitled, perhaps even obliged, to overcome anything (...)
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  14. Gordana Djeric (2006). European-Enlightenment and National-Romanticist Sources of Cultural Memory: Reflections in Contemporary Debates. Filozofija I Društvo 30:77-88.score: 21.0
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  15. M. A. Paley (2004). Gadow's Romanticism: Science, Poetry and Embodiment in Postmodern Nursing. Nursing Philosophy 5 (2):112–126.score: 21.0
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  16. James Engell (1981). The Creative Imagination: Enlightenment to Romanticism. Harvard University Press.score: 21.0
     
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  17. Edward T. Duffy (2013). Secular Mysteries: Stanley Cavell and English Romanticism. Bloomsbury Academic.score: 21.0
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  18. Leonard M. Trawick (1967). Backgrounds of Romanticism. Bloomington, Indiana University Press.score: 21.0
    An appeal to all that doubt or disbelieve the truths of the Gospel, whether they be deists, Arians, Socinians, or nominal Christians, by W. Law.--Siris; a chain of philosophical reflexions and inquiries concerning the virtues of tar water, and divers other subjects, by G. Berkeley.--Observations on man, his frame, his duty, and his expectations, by D. Hartley.--The theory of moral sentiments, by A. Smith.--An essay on original genius, by W. Duff.--The light of nature pursued, by A. Tucker.--A new system; or, (...)
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  19. Bruce W. Wilshire (1968). Romanticism and Evolution: The Nineteenth Century. New York, Putnam.score: 21.0
     
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  20. Robert J. Richards, The Impact of German Romanticism on Biology in the Nineteenth Century.score: 18.0
    Many revolutionary proposals entered the biological disciplines during the late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, theories that provided the foundations for today’s science and gave structure to its various branches. Cell theory, evolutionary theory, and genetics achieved their modern form during this earlier time. The period also saw a variety of new, auxiliary hypotheses that supplied necessary supports for the more comprehensive theories. These included ideas in morphology, embryology, systematics, language, and behavior. These scientific developments forced a reconceptualization of nature and (...)
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  21. Andrew Bowie (1997). From Romanticism to Critical Theory: The Philosophy of German Literary Theory. Routledge.score: 18.0
    From Romanticism to Critical Theory explores the philosophical origins of literary theory via the tradition of German philosophy that began with the Romantic reaction to Kant. It traces the continuation of the Romantic tradition of Novalis, Friedrich Schlegel and Schleiermacher, in Heidegger's approaches to art and thruth, and in the Critical Theory of Benjamin and Adorno. Andrew Bowie argues, against many current assumptions, that the key aspect of literary theory is not the demonstration of how meaning can be deconstructed, (...)
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  22. D. Z. Phillips (2002). Winch and Romanticism. Philosophy 77 (2):261-279.score: 18.0
    Philosophical romanticism is the view that, in maintaining out forms of life, we are engaged in the endless task of “acknowledging the human” in reading and being read by others. Winch's discussions of “human nature” and the principle of universalizability in ethics should discourage us from imputing such romanticism to his work. On the other hand, his discussions of generality in “the human” and the human neighbourhood might tempt one to do so. Winch's contemplative conception of philosophy should, (...)
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  23. Richard Crouter (2005). Friedrich Schleiermacher: Between Enlightenment and Romanticism. Cambridge University Press.score: 18.0
    Friedrich Schleiermacher's groundbreaking work in theology and philosophy was forged in the cultural ferment of Berlin at the convergence of the Enlightenment and Romanticism. The three sections of this book include illuminating sketches of Schleiermacher's relationship to contemporaries, his work as a public theologian, as well as the formation and impact of his two most famous books, On Religion and The Christian Faith. Richard Crouter's essays examine the theologian's stance regarding the status of doctrine, church and political authority, and (...)
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  24. Gregor McLennan & Thomas Osborne (2003). Contemporary 'Vehicularity' and 'Romanticism': Debating the Status of Ideas and Intellectuals. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 6 (4):51-66.score: 18.0
    (2003). Contemporary ‘vehicularity’ and ‘romanticism’: debating the status of ideas and intellectuals. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy: Vol. 6, The Public Role of Intellectuals, pp. 51-66. doi: 10.1080/1369823042000241267.
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  25. Corey McCall (2007). Foucault's Alleged Irrationalism: The Legacy of German Romanticism in the Thought of Michel Foucault. Idealistic Studies 37 (1):1-13.score: 18.0
    Commentators often construe Foucault as an anti-Enlightenment thinker; much of this criticism assumes that Foucault inherits early German Romanticismin some sense. This essay examines these claims by assessing the role the German Romantics play in Foucault’s work, both early and late. After a briefconsideration of the meaning of the term “Romanticism,” the essay examines the role that language and literature plays in Foucault early texts before examining the place of self-formation or Bildung in his later work. I conclude that (...)
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  26. David Duff (2009). Romanticism and the Uses of Genre. OUP Oxford.score: 18.0
    This wide-ranging and original book reappraises the role of genre, and genre theory, in British Romanticism. Analyzing numerous examples from 1760 to 1830, David Duff examines the generic innovations and experiments which propel the Romantic 'revolution in literature', but also the fascination with archaic forms such as the ballad, sonnet, epic, and romance, whose revival and transformation make Romanticism a 'retro' movement as well as a revolutionary one. The tension between the drives to 'make it old' and to (...)
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  27. Thomas Blom Hansen (1997). Inside the Romanticist Episteme. Thesis Eleven 48 (1):21-41.score: 18.0
    Many contemporary critiques of `modernity' target a caricatured construction of `modernity-as-universalist-reason'. Such critiques are often blind to the constitutive splits and tensions within the philosophical and political horizons of modernity between a rationalist and a romanticist episteme. These critiques are therefore also oblivious to the fact that their own critiques of modernity move on a terrain heavily structured and prefigured by older romanticist critiques of reason and scientific objectivity. Some of the persistent problems in romanticist thought - the celebration of (...)
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  28. Michael Ferber (2010). Romanticism: A Very Short Introduction. OUP Oxford.score: 18.0
    What is Romanticism? In this Very Short Introduction Michael Ferber answers this by considering who the romantics were and looks at what they had in common -- their ideas, beliefs, commitments, and tastes. He looks at the birth and growth of Romanticism throughout Europe and the Americas, and examines various types of Romantic literature, music, painting, religion, and philosophy. -/- Focusing on topics, Ferber looks at the 'Sensibility' movement, which preceded Romanticism; the rising prestige of the poet; (...)
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  29. Paul Lauritzen (1989). A Feminist Ethic and the New Romanticism: Mothering as a Model of Moral Relations. Hypatia 4 (2):29 - 44.score: 18.0
    This paper claims that recent attempts to draw on the maternal experiences of women in order to articulate an ethic of care and compassion is a new romanticism. Like earlier romantic views, it is both attractive and potentially dangerous. The paper examines the basic claims of this new romanticism in order to identify both its strengths and weaknesses. I conclude that there are at least two versions of this new romanticism, one that relies primarily on the experiences (...)
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  30. Marc Redfield (2003). The Politics of Aesthetics: Nationalism, Gender, Romanticism. Stanford University Press.score: 18.0
    This book suggests that modern cultural and critical institutions have persistently associated questions of aesthetics and politics with literature, theory, technics, and Romanticism.
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  31. Manfred Frank (2003). The Philosophical Foundations of Early German Romanticism. State University of New York Press.score: 18.0
    Explores the philosophical contributions and contemporary relevance of early German Romanticism.
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  32. Cyrus Masroori (2007). French Romanticism and Persian Liberalism in Nineteenth-Century Iran: Mirza Aqa Khan Kirmani and Jacques-Henri Bernardin de Saint-Pierre. History of Political Thought 28 (3):542-556.score: 18.0
    Intellectual encounters between Europe and the Middle East have a long and rich history. During the last two centuries these encounters have accelerated, creating valuable opportunities to study the evolution of political concepts and dissemination of political ideas. This article examines one example of such encounters, showing how a liberal Persian intellectual of the late nineteenth century has borrowed and manipulated concepts from a French Romanticist of the late seventeenth century. Guided by theoretical insights from Quentin Skinner and Fred Dallmayr, (...)
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  33. Jean-Luc Nancy & Philippe Lacoue-Labarthe (1988). The Literary Absolute: The Theory of Literature in German Romanticism. SUNY.score: 18.0
    The Theory of Literature in German Romanticism Philippe Lacoue-Labarthe, Jean-Luc Nancy. Preface: The. Literary. Absolute. I. "There are classifications that are bad enough as classifications, but that have nonetheless dominated entire ...
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  34. George Pattison (2013). Kierkegaard and the Quest for Unambiguous Life: Between Romanticism and Modernism: Selected Essays. Oup Oxford.score: 18.0
    This book shows Kierkegaard's role in literary, religious, and political movements associated with romanticism, modernism and existentialism. It explores his background in romantic literature and his response to aspects of contemporary urban culture and goes on to show how his influence in the 20th century.
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  35. Louis A. Ruprecht (2002). Was Greek Thought Religious?: On the Use and Abuse of Hellenism, From Rome to Romanticism. Palgrave/St. Martin's Press.score: 18.0
    The Greeks are on trial. They have been for generations, if not millennia, from Rome in the first century, to Romanticism in the nineteenth. We debate the place of the Greeks in the university curriculum, in New World culture--we even debate the place of the Greeks in the European Union. This book notices the lingering and half-hidden presence of the Greeks in some strange places--everywhere from the US Supreme Court to the Modern Olympic Games--and in so doing makes an (...)
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  36. Peter Foley (2008). Schleiermacher's Early Romanticism. In Hermann Patsch, Hans Dierkes, Terrence N. Tice & Wolfgang Virmond (eds.), Schleiermacher, Romanticism, and the Critical Arts: A Festschrift in Honor of Hermann Patsch. Edwin Mellen Press.score: 18.0
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  37. Eric Sean Nelson (2008). Schleiermacher and Romanticism. In Hermann Patsch, Hans Dierkes, Terrence N. Tice & Wolfgang Virmond (eds.), Schleiermacher, Romanticism, and the Critical Arts: A Festschrift in Honor of Hermann Patsch. Edwin Mellen Press.score: 18.0
  38. Simon Cullen (2010). Survey-Driven Romanticism. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 1 (2):275-296.score: 15.0
    Despite well-established results in survey methodology, many experimental philosophers have not asked whether and in what way conclusions about folk intuitions follow from people’s responses to their surveys. Rather, they appear to have proceeded on the assumption that intuitions can be simply read off from survey responses. Survey research, however, is fraught with difficulties. I review some of the relevant literature—particularly focusing on the conversational pragmatic aspects of survey research—and consider its application to common experimental philosophy surveys. I argue for (...)
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  39. Thomas Mormann (2010). Enlightenment and Formal Romanticism - Carnap’s Account of Philosophy as Explication. Vienna Circle Institute Yearbook 14:263 - 329.score: 15.0
  40. Thomas Mormann (2012). Carnap's Boundless Ocean of Unlimited Possibilities: Between Enlightenment and Romanticism. In Pierre Wagner (ed.), Carnap’s Ideal of Explication and Naturalism. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 15.0
  41. Kristin Gjesdal (2008). Between Enlightenment and Romanticism: Some Problems and Challenges in Gadamer's Hermeneutics. Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (2):pp. 285-305.score: 15.0
    The essay takes as its point of departure the way in which the work of Hans-Georg Gadamer has recently been adopted by philosophers such as Richard Rorty, John McDowell, and Robert Brandom. While appreciating the way in which Truth and Method has gained new relevance within an Anglo-American context, I ask whether sufficient attention has been paid to Gadamer’s romantic heritage. In particular I question the way in which his notion of tradition and historical truth, designed as it is to (...)
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  42. Yoel Matveyev (2011). Between Enlightenment and Romanticism: Computational Kabbalah of Rabbi Pinchas Elijah Hurwitz. History and Philosophy of Logic 32 (1):85-101.score: 15.0
    This article shows that Rabbi Pinchas Elijah Hurwitz, a major eighteenth-century kabbalist, Orthodox rabbi and Enlightenment thinker, who merged Lurianic Kabbalah with Kantian philosophy, attempted to describe God and the world in terms of formal grammars and abstract information processes. He resolves a number of Kant's dualistic views by introducing prophecy as a tool that allows a mystic's mind to perform transfinite hypercomputation and to obtain a priori knowledge about things usually known only a posteriori. According to Hurwitz, the reality (...)
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  43. Andrew Baird (1996). Reviews : Stephen Bann, Romanticism and the Rise of History. New York: Twayne Publishers, 1995. Ix + 189 Pp. [REVIEW] History of the Human Sciences 9 (3):131-140.score: 15.0
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  44. Charles Larmore (1991). Romanticism and Modernity. Inquiry 34 (1):77 – 89.score: 15.0
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  45. David Morgan (1996). The Enchantment of Art: Abstraction and Empathy From German Romanticism to Expressionism. Journal of the History of Ideas 57 (2):317-341.score: 15.0
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  46. David Granger (2003). Expression, Imagination, and Organic Unity: John Dewey's Aesthetics and Romanticism. Journal of Aesthetic Education 37 (2):46-60.score: 15.0
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  47. Richard Kearney & David M. Rasmussen (eds.) (2001). Continental Aesthetics: Romanticism to Postmodernism: An Anthology. Blackwell Publishers.score: 15.0
    The range and significance of the primary sources presented, together with the editors' introductions, make this volume essential for anyone interested in ...
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  48. Alison Stone (2005). Friedrich Schlegel, Romanticism, and the Re-Enchantment of Nature. Inquiry 48 (1):3 – 25.score: 15.0
    In this paper I reconstruct Schlegel's idea that romantic poetry can re-enchant nature in a way that is uniquely compatible with modernity's epistemic and political values of criticism, self-criticism, and freedom. I trace several stages in Schlegel's early thinking concerning nature. First, he criticises modern culture for its analytic, reflective form of rationality which encourages a disenchanting view of nature. Second, he re-evaluates this modern form of rationality as making possible an ironic, romantic, poetry, which portrays natural phenomena as mysterious (...)
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  49. Nicholas Wolterstorff (1987). Philosophy of Art After Analysis and Romanticism. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 46:151-167.score: 15.0
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