Search results for 'Ronald A. Amundson' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Ronald A. Amundson (2006). EvoDevo as Cognitive Psychology. Biological Theory 1 (1):10-11.score: 870.0
  2. Ronald Amundson & Hans Jenny (1997). On a State Factor Model of Ecosystems. Bioscience 47 (8):536-543.score: 630.0
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  3. Sally A. Amundson (2008). Functional Genomics and a New Era in Radiation Biology and Oncology. Bioscience 58 (6):491-500.score: 420.0
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  4. Ron Amundson & Shari Tresky (2007). On a Bioethical Challenge to Disability Rights. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 32 (6):541 – 561.score: 300.0
    Tensions exist between the disability rights movement and the work of many bioethicists. These reveal themselves in a major recent book on bioethics and genetics, From Chance to Choice: Genetics and Justice. This book defends certain genetic policies against criticisms from disability rights advocates, in part by arguing that it is possible to accept both the genetic policies and the rights of people with impairments. However, a close reading of the book reveals a series of direct moral criticisms of the (...)
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  5. Ron Amundson (1983). E. C. Tolman and the Intervening Variable: A Study in the Epistemological History of Psychology. Philosophy of Science 50 (2):268-282.score: 300.0
    E. C. Tolman's 'purposive behaviorism' is commonly interpreted as an attempt to operationalize a cognitivist theory of learning by the use of the 'Intervening Variable' (IV). Tolman would thus be a counterinstance to an otherwise reliable correlation of cognitivism with realism, and S-R behaviorism with operationalism. A study of Tolman's epistemological background, with a careful reading of his methodological writings, shows the common interpretation to be false. Tolman was a cognitivist and a realist. His 'IV' has been systematically misinterpreted by (...)
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  6. Ron Amundson (1983). The Epistemological Status of a Naturalized Epistemology. Inquiry 26 (3):333 – 344.score: 300.0
    Philosophically inclined psychologists and psychologically inclined philosophers often hold that the substantive discoveries of psychology can provide an empirical foundation for epistemology. In this paper it is argued that the ambition to found epistemology empirically faces certain unnoticed difficulties. Empirical theories concerned with knowledge?gaining abilities have been historically associated with specific epistemological views such that the epistemology gives preferential support to the substantive theory, while the theory empirically supports the epistemology. Theories attribute to the subject just those epistemic abilities which (...)
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  7. Ronald Amundson & Hans Jenny (1997). Thinking of Biology. Bioscience 47 (8):536.score: 240.0
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  8. Ronald Amundson (1979). Testing Utility. Teaching Philosophy 3 (2):35-38.score: 240.0
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  9. Michael A. Amundson (2014). Wyoming Revisited: Rephotographing the Scenes of Joseph E. Stimson. University Press of Colorado.score: 240.0
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  10. Ron Amundson & George V. Lauder (1994). Function Without Purpose. Biology and Philosophy 9 (4):443-469.score: 120.0
    Philosophers of evolutionary biology favor the so-called etiological concept of function according to which the function of a trait is its evolutionary purpose, defined as the effect for which that trait was favored by natural selection. We term this the selected effect (SE) analysis of function. An alternative account of function was introduced by Robert Cummins in a non-evolutionary and non-purposive context. Cummins''s account has received attention but little support from philosophers of biology. This paper will show that a similar (...)
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  11. Ron Amundson (1994). Two Concepts of Constraint: Adaptationism and the Challenge From Developmental Biology. Philosophy of Science 61 (4):556-578.score: 120.0
    The so-called "adaptationism" of mainstream evolutionary biology has been criticized from a variety of sources. One, which has received relatively little philosophical attention, is developmental biology. Developmental constraints are said to be neglected by adaptationists. This paper explores the divergent methodological and explanatory interests that separate mainstream evolutionary biology from its embryological and developmental critics. It will focus on the concept of constraint itself; even this central concept is understood differently by the two sides of the dispute.
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  12. Ron Amundson & Shari Tresky (2008). Bioethics and Disability Rights: Conflicting Values and Perspectives. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 5 (2/3):111-123.score: 120.0
    Continuing tensions exist between mainstream bioethics and advocates of the disability rights movement. This paper explores some of the grounds for those tensions as exemplified in From Chance to Choice: Genetics and Justice by Allen Buchanan and coauthors, a book by four prominent bioethicists that is critical of the disability rights movement. One set of factors involves the nature of disability and impairment. A second set involves presumptions regarding social values, including the importance of intelligence in relation to other human (...)
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  13. Ron Amundson & Laurence D. Smith (1984). Clark Hull, Robert Cummins, and Functional Analysis. Philosophy of Science 51 (December):657-666.score: 120.0
    Robert Cummins has recently used the program of Clark Hull to illustrate the effects of logical positivist epistemology upon psychological theory. On Cummins's account, Hull's theory is best understood as a functional analysis, rather than a nomological subsumption. Hull's commitment to the logical positivist view of explanation is said to have blinded him to this aspect of this theory, and thus restricted its scope. We will argue that this interpretation of Hull's epistemology, though common, is mistaken. Hull's epistemological views were (...)
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  14. Ron Amundson, Accounting For Vertebrate Limbs: From Owen's Homology To Novelty In Evo-Devo.score: 120.0
    This article reviews the recent reissuing of Richard Owen’s On the Nature of Limbs and its three novel, introductory essays. These essays make Owen’s 1849 text very accessible by discussing the historical context of his work and explaining how Owen’s ideas relate to his larger intellectual framework. In addition to the ways in which the essays point to Owen’s relevance for contemporary biology, I discuss how Owen’s unity of type theory and his homology claims about fins and limbs compare with (...)
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  15. Ron Amundson (1982). Science, Ethnoscience, and Ethnocentrism. Philosophy of Science 49 (2):236-250.score: 120.0
    The conventionalist epistemology of cultural anthropology can be seen to be embedded in the methods of 'cognitive anthropology', the study of folk conceptual systems. These methods result in indiscriminately depicting all folk systems as conventional, whether or not the systems are intended by the native to represent objective features of the world. Hypothetical and actual ethnographic situations are discussed. It is concluded that the anthropologist's projection of his/her own epistemology onto a native system is ethnocentric. This epistemological prejudice may be (...)
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  16. Ron Amundson (2000). Embryology and Evolution 1920-1960: Worlds Apart? History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 22 (3):335 - 352.score: 120.0
    During the early part of the 20th century most embryologists were skeptical about the significance of Mendelian genetics to embryological development. A few embryologists began to study the developmental effects of Mendelian genes around 1940. Such work was a necessary step on the path to modern developmental biology. It occurred during the time when the Evolutionary Synthesis was integrating Mendelian and population genetics into a unified evolutionary theory. Why did the first embryological geneticists begin their study at that particular time? (...)
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  17. John Immerwahr (1985). Ronald Amundson," Testing Utility," Teaching Philosophy 3: 2, Fall, 1 979, 1 73-6. Robert S. Brumbaugh," The Mathematical Imagery of Plato, Republic X," Teaching Philosophy 7: 3, July 1 984, 223-7. Robert S. Brumbaugh," Teaching Plato's Republic VIII and Rx," Teaching Philosophy 3: 3, Spring 1 980, 33 1-7. [REVIEW] Philosophy 8:47-53.score: 72.0
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  18. John Perry, Prolegomena to a Theory of Disability, Inability and Handicap.score: 42.0
    Underlying the political activism that led to the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) was what Ron Amundson has called the environmental conception of disability[1]. In [7] we called this the circumstantial conception of disability and handicap, and contrasted it with the intrinsic conception. We use disability to mean loss of a function, such as moving the hands or seeing, that is part of the standard repertoire for humans. Handicap is a species of inability, in particular, the inability to do (...)
     
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  19. D. Christopher Ralston & Justin Ho (2007). Disability, Humanity, and Personhood: A Survey of Moral Concepts. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 32 (6):619 – 633.score: 42.0
    Three of the articles included in this issue of the Journal of Medicine and Philosophy - Ron Amundson and Shari Tresky's "On a Bioethical Challenge to Disability Rights"; Rachel Cooper's "Can It Be a Good Thing to Be Deaf?"; and Mark T. Brown's "The Potential of the Human Embryo" - interact (in various ways) with the concepts of disability, humanity, and personhood and their normative dimensions. As one peruses these articles, it becomes apparent that terms like "disability," "human being," (...)
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  20. Tim Lewens (2009). What is Wrong with Typological Thinking? Philosophy of Science 76 (3):355-371.score: 24.0
    What, if anything, is wrong with typological thinking? The question is important, for some evolutionary developmental biologists appear to espouse a form of typology. I isolate four allegations that have been brought against it. They include the claim that typological thinking is mystical; the claim that typological thinking is at odds with the fact of evolution; the claim that typological thinking is committed to an objectionable metaphysical view, which Elliott Sober calls the ‘natural state model’; and finally the view (endorsed (...)
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  21. Ben Almassi (2010). Disability, Functional Diversity, and Trans/Feminism. International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 3 (2):126-149.score: 24.0
    Feminist approaches to bioethics have the striking ability to usefully disrupt conversations otherwise in danger of calcifying into immovable opposing camps. Take, for instance, debates between theorists in disability studies and bioethicists who often take two different approaches to understanding disability. On one side are those such as Buchanan, Brock, Daniels, and Wikler (2000) who seek to locate the apparent functional deficiency of disability in biologically abnormal bodies. Let us call this a normal functioning approach to understanding disability. On the (...)
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  22. D. M. Walsh, Causes of Adaptation and the Unity of Science.score: 24.0
    Evolutionary Biology has two principal explananda, fit and diversity (Lewontin 1978). Natural selection theory stakes its claim to being the central unifying concept in biology on the grounds that it demonstrates both phenomena to be the consequence of a single process. By now the standard story hardly needs reiterating: Natural selection is a force that operates over a population, preserving the better fit, culling the less fit, and along the way promoting novel solutions to adaptive problems. Amundson’s historical survey (...)
     
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