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Ronald A. Lindsay [10]Ronald Alan Lindsay [4]
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Profile: Ronald Lindsay (Center for Inquiry)
  1. Ronald A. Lindsay (2009). Bioethics Policies and the Compass of Common Morality. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 30 (1):31-43.
    Even if there is a common morality, many would argue that it provides little guidance in resolving moral disputes, because universally accepted norms are both general in content and few in number. However, if we supplement common morality with commonly accepted factual beliefs and culture-specific norms and utilize coherentist reasoning, we can limit the range of acceptable answers to disputed issues. Moreover, in the arena of public policy, where one must take into account both legal and moral norms, the constraints (...)
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  2. Ronald A. Lindsay (2009). Oregon's Experience: Evaluating the Record. American Journal of Bioethics 9 (3):19 – 27.
    Prior to passage of the Oregon Death with Dignity Act, opponents of assistance in dying argued that legalization would have serious harmful consequences. Specifically, they argued that the quality and availability of palliative care would decline, that the harms of legalization would affect certain vulnerable groups disproportionately, that legal assisted dying could not be confined to the competent terminally ill who voluntarily request assistance, and that the practice would result in frequent abuses. Data from Oregon's decade-long experience decisively refute the (...)
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  3. Ronald A. Lindsay (2008). Future Bioethics: Overcoming Taboos, Myths, and Dogmas. Prometheus Books.
     
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  4. Ronald A. Lindsay (2007). Stem Cell Research. In Paul Kurtz & David R. Koepsell (eds.), Science and Ethics: Can Science Help Us Make Wise Moral Judgments? Prometheus Books. 43.
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  5. Ronald A. Lindsay (2007). When to Grant Conscientious Objector Status. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (6):25 – 26.
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  6. Ronald A. Lindsay (2006). Why Should We Be Concerned About Disparate Impact? American Journal of Bioethics 6 (5):23 – 24.
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  7. Ronald Alan Lindsay (2006). Gonzales V. Oregon and the Politics of Medicine. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 16 (1):99-104.
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  8. Ronald A. Lindsay (2005). Enhancements and Justice: Problems in Determining the Requirements of Justice in a Genetically Transformed Society. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 15 (1):3-38.
    : There is a concern that genetic engineering will exacerbate existing social divisions and inequalities, especially if only the wealthy can afford genetic enhancements. Accordingly, many argue that justice requires the imposition of constraints on genetic engineering. However, it would be unwise to decide at this time what limits should be imposed in the future. Decision makers currently lack both the theoretical tools and the factual foundation for making sound judgments about the requirements of justice in a genetically transformed society. (...)
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  9. Ronald A. Lindsay (2005). Slaves, Embryos, and Nonhuman Animals: Moral Status and the Limitations of Common Morality Theory. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 15 (4):323-346.
    : Common morality theory must confront apparent counterexamples from the history of morality, such as the widespread acceptance of slavery in prior eras, that suggest core norms have changed over time. A recent defense of common morality theory addresses this problem by drawing a distinction between the content of the norms of the common morality and the range of individuals to whom these norms apply. This distinction is successful in reconciling common morality theory with practices such as slavery, but only (...)
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  10. Ronald Alan Lindsay (2005). Enhancements and Justice: Problems in Determining the Requirements of Justice in a Genetically Transformed Society. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 15 (1):3-38.
  11. Ronald Alan Lindsay (2005). Slaves, Embryos, and Nonhuman Animals: Moral Status and the Limitations of Common Morality Theory. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 15 (4):323-346.
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  12. Ronald A. Lindsay (2002). Should We Impose Quotas? Evaluating the "Disparate Impact" Argument Against Legalization of Assisted Suicide. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 30 (1):6-16.
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  13. Ronald A. Lindsay (2002). The Need to Specify the Difference "Difference" Makes. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 30 (1):34-37.
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