91 found
Sort by:
  1. Ronald M. Green, Alvaro Pascual-Leone & Eric M. Wasserman (forthcoming). Ethical Guidelines for rTMS Research. IRB: Ethics & Human Research.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Ronald M. Green & Nathan J. Palpant (eds.) (2014). Suffering and Bioethics. Oup Usa.
    Before curing was a possibility, medicine was devoted to the relief of suffering. Attention to the relief of suffering often takes a back seat in modern biomedicine. This book seeks to place suffering at the center of biomedical attention, examining suffering in its biological, psychological, clinical, religious, and ethical dimensions.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Ronald M. Green (2013). Challenging Transhumanism's Values. Hastings Center Report 43 (4):45-47.
  4. Ronald M. Green (2013). Health and Disease in Religions. In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), The International Encyclopedia of Ethics. Wiley-Blackwell.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Al Gini & Ronald M. Green (2012). Bad Leaders/Misleaders. Business and Society Review 117 (2):143-154.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Ronald M. Green (2012). Ethical Issues in the Development and Use of Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Gametes. Ethics in Biology, Engineering and Medicine 3 (4):237-245.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Ronald M. Green (2011). Confronting Rationality. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 20 (2):216-227.
    From the first initiatives in preimplantation genetic diagnosis and gene therapy through the advent of stem cell research to the development of mammalian cloning, the past two decades have witnessed remarkable advances in “reprogenetic” medicine: the union of assisted reproductive technologies with genetic control. This period has also been marked by intense debates within the bioethical literature and in national policy forums about the appropriate uses of these emerging human capabilities. We can now, in a limited way, select for genetic (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Ronald M. Green (2011). Should We Retire Derek Parfit? Hastings Center Report 41 (1):3-3.
    For nearly a generation, Derek Parfit's arguments in his 1984 book Reasons and Persons have shaped debates about our moral responsibilities to future people. Struggling to accommodate Parfit's insights, philosophers and bioethicists have minimized or accentuated obligations to the future in ways that defy ordinary moral intuitions. In this issue, Robert Sparrow develops the troubling implications of the views of two leading theorists whose work favoring human genetic enhancement is influenced by Parfit. Sparrow believes they return us to the horrors (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Ronald M. Green (2010). Review of Robert Erlewine, Monotheism and Tolerance: Recovering a Religion of Reason. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (6).
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Ronald M. Green (2010). The President's Council on Bioethics—Requiescat in Pace. Journal of Religious Ethics 38 (2):197-218.
    In mid-June 2009, the Obama administration dissolved the President's Council on Bioethics (PCBE), a group established by President George W. Bush in August 2001 and whose nearly eight-year life was marked from beginning to end by controversy. While some will regret the PCBE's passing, others will regard the Council as a failed experiment in doing public bioethics.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Ronald M. Green (2010). The Risks of “Sexual Normalcy”. American Journal of Bioethics 10 (7):13-14.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Ronald M. Green (2010). Political Interventions in U.S. Human Embryo Research: An Ethical Assessment. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 38 (2):220-228.
    For more than 30 years, beginning with the Reagan administration's refusal to support and provide oversight for embryo research, and continuing to the present in congressionally imposed limits on funding for such research, progress in infertility medicine and the development of stem cell therapies has been seriously delayed by a series of political interventions. In almost all cases, these interventions result from a view of the moral status of human embryo premised largely on religious assumptions. Although some believe that these (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Ronald M. Green & Aine Donovan (2010). The Methods of Business Ethics. In George G. Brenkert & Tom L. Beauchamp (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Business Ethics. Oxford University Press.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Donald G. Dutton, British Vancouver, Gordon Graham, Ronald M. Green, Rohan Hardcastle & Dieter Helm (2008). John Aberth, The Black Death: The Great Mortality of 1348–1350. New York: St. Martin's Press, 2005, 199 Pp.(Indexed). ISBN 978-031240 0873, $39.96 (Hb). Kim-Chong Chong, Early Confucian Ethics: Concepts and Arguments. Chicago: Open Court Publishing, 2007, 208 Pp.(Indexed). ISBN. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 42:419-420.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Ronald M. Green (2008). Embryo as Epiphenomenon: Some Cultural, Social and Economic Forces Driving the Stem Cell Debate. Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (12):840-844.
    Our human embryonic stem cell debates are not simply about good or bad ethical arguments. The fetus and the embryo have instead become symbols for a larger set of value conflicts occasioned by social and cultural changes. Beneath our stem cell debates lie conflicts between those who would privilege scientific progress and individual choice and others who favour the sanctity of family life and traditional family roles. Also at work, on both the national and international levels, is the use of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Ronald M. Green (2008). Embryo as Epiphenomenon: Understanding Our Global Stem Cell Debates. In Ronald M. Green, Aine Donovan & Steven A. Jauss (eds.), Global Bioethics: Issues of Conscience for the Twenty-First Century. Oup Oxford.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Ronald M. Green (2008). Either/Or: Kierkegaard s Great Overture. Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook:24-37.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Ronald Michael Green, Aine Donovan & Steven A. Jauss (eds.) (2008). Global Bioethics: Issues of Conscience for the Twenty-First Century. Oxford University Press.
    Global Bioethics gathers some of the world's leading bioethicists to explore many of the new questions raised by the globalization of medical care and ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Ronald M. Green (2006). For Richer or Poorer? Evaluating the President's Council on Bioethics. HEC Forum 18 (2):108-124.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Ronald M. Green (2005). From Genome to Brainome: Charting Lessons Learned. In Judy Illes (ed.), Neuroethics: Defining the Issues in Theory, Practice, and Policy. Oup Oxford.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Ronald M. Green (2005). Foundations of Jewish Ethics. In William Schweiker (ed.), The Blackwell Companion to Religious Ethics. Blackwell Pub.. 166--175.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Ronald M. Green (2005). Spy Versus Spy. American Journal of Bioethics 5 (2):53-54.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Ronald Michael Green (2005). Last Word: Imagining the Future. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 15 (1):101-106.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Ronald M. Green (2004). Bad "Science". American Journal of Bioethics 4 (1):21 – 22.
  25. Tom L. Beauchamp, Howard Brody, Franklin G. Miller, Alexander S. Curtis, Martina Darragh, Patricia Milmoe, Ronald M. U. S. Green, Sharona Hoffman, Edmund G. Howe & Jeffrey P. Kahn (2003). By Author BAGHERI, Alireza. Criticism of “Brain. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 13 (4):407-09.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Ronald M. Green (2003). Setup for Failure. Teaching Ethics 4 (1):69-76.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Ronald Michael Green (2003). U.S. Defunding of UNFPa: A Moral Analysis. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 13 (4):393-406.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Ronald M. Green (2002). Benefiting From 'Evil': An Incipient Moral Problem in Human Stem Cell Research. Bioethics 16 (6):544–556.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Ronald M. Green (2002). [Book Review] the Human Embryo Research Debates, Bioethics in the Vortex of Controversy. [REVIEW] Hastings Center Report 32 (5):41-43.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Ronald M. Green (2002). Stem Cell Research: A Target Article Collection Part III - Determining Moral Status. American Journal of Bioethics 2 (1):20 – 30.
    In this chapter, I review some of the background thinking concerning matters of moral status that I had developed in previous years and that I would now bring to the work of the Human Embryo Research Panel. Two ideas were at the forefront of my thinking. First, that biology usually offers not decisive "events" but only continuous processes of development. Second, in making status determinations we do not so much "identify" a point on a developmental continuum where moral respect should (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Ronald M. Green (2002). Welcome to Project MUSE. American Journal of Bioethics 2 (1):20-30.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Ronald M. Green, Kier Olsen Devries, Judith Bernstein, Kenneth W. Goodman, Robert Kaufmann, Ann A. Kiessling, Susan R. Levin, Susan L. Moss & Carol A. Tauer (2002). Overseeing Research on Therapeutic Cloning: A Private Ethics Board Responds to Its Critics. Hastings Center Report 32 (3):27-33.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Ronald M. Green (2001). A Review of Al Gini'sMy Job, My Self: Work and the Creation of the Modern Individual. [REVIEW] Business and Society Review 106 (4):399-401.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Ronald M. Green (2001). Access to Healthcare: Going Beyond Fair Equality of Opportunity. American Journal of Bioethics 1 (2):22 – 23.
  35. Ronald M. Green (2001). Christian Ethics : A Jewish Perspective. In Robin Gill (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Christian Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Ronald M. Green (2001). Guiding Principles of Jewish Ethics. Spiritual Goods 2001:367-380.
    This discussion develops six of the most important guiding principles of classical Jewish business ethics and illustrates their application to a complex recent case of product liability. These principles are: (1) the legitimacy of business activity and profit; (2) the divine origin and ordination of wealth (and hence the limits and obligations of human ownership); (3) the preeminent position in decision making given to the protection and preservation (sanctity) of human life; (4) the protection of consumers from commercial harm; (5) (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Ronald Michael Green (2001). What Does It Mean to Use Someone as "a Means Only": Rereading Kant. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 11 (3):247-261.
    : Debates about commodification in bioethics frequently appeal to Kant's famous second formulation of the categorical imperative, the formula requiring us to treat the rational (human) being as "an end in itself" and "never as a means only." In the course of her own treatment of commodification, Margaret Jane Radin observes that Kant's application of this formula "does not generate noncontroversial particular consequences." This is so, I argue, because Kant offers three different--and largely incompatible--interpretations of the formula. One focuses on (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Ronald M. Green (2000). Legally Targeting Gun Makers. Business Ethics Quarterly 10 (1):203-210.
    As a “case” in business ethics, the conduct of the firearms industry is hardly dilemmatic. The responsible choices before firearmmanufacturers have long been clear, if largely neglected. The great interest here for business ethicists lies in understanding how civillaw and ethics can work together to bring a rogue industry under control. Business ethicists have a role to play in shaping the formationof legal standards in this area. In turn, emerging concepts of manufacturers’ liability can make a contribution to the teaching (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Ronald M. Green (1999). Peter Byrne the Moral Interpretation of Religion. (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 1998). Pp. 178. £14·95 Pbk. Religious Studies 35 (3):371-384.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Ronald M. Green (1998). Heuristic Power as the Test of Theory: A Response to Francisca Cho. Journal of Religious Ethics 26 (1):175 - 184.
    The author begins by defending a view of comparative religious ethics as a "scientific" enterprise that seeks to develop generalizable knowledge of the variety of religious-ethical traditions and their relation to morality. Responding to Francisca Cho's use of the Daoist tradition to present a radical challenge to this possibility, the author suggests that she, too, unavoidably seeks to offer generalizable knowledge based on her reading of this tradition. After responding to Cho's major criticisms of his own interpretation of Daoism, the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. A. Mathew Thomas, Gene Cohen, Robert M. Cook-Deegan, Joan O'sullivan, Stephen G. Post, Allen D. Roses, Kenneth F. Schaffner & Ronald M. Green (1998). Alzheimer Testing at Silver Years. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 7 (3):294-307.
    Early last year, the GenEthics Consortium (GEC) of the Washington Metropolitan Area convened at George Washington University to consider a complex case about genetic testing for Alzheimer disease (AD). The GEC consists of scientists, bioethicists, lawyers, genetic counselors, and consumers from a variety of institutions and affiliations. Four of the 8 co-authors of this paper delivered presentations on the case. Supplemented by additional ethical and legal observations, these presentations form the basis for the following discussion.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Ronald M. Green (1997). Guiding Principles of Jewish Business Ethics. Business Ethics Quarterly 7 (2):21-30.
    This discussion develops six of the most important guiding principles of classical Jewish business ethics and illustrates their application to a complex recent case of product liability. These principles are: (1) the legitimacy of business activity and profit; (2) the divine origin and ordination of wealth (and hence the limits and obligations of human ownership); (3) the preeminent position in decision making given to the protection and preservation (sanctity) of human life; (4) the protection of consumers from commercial harm; (5) (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Ronald M. Green (1997). John Hare. The Moral Gap: Kantian Ethics, Human Limits and God's Assistance. Pp. 292. (Oxford: The Clarendon Press, 1996.). [REVIEW] Religious Studies 33 (2):227-237.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Ronald M. Green (1997). Parental Autonomy and the Obligation Not to Harm One's Child Genetically. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 25 (1):5-15.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Ronald M. Green (1997). Probing the Depths of Practical Reason: Looking Back Over Twenty-Five Years. Journal of Religious Ethics 25 (1):15 - 23.
    My contributions to the early issues of the "Journal of Religious Ethics" display the conviction that moral judgments and religious beliefs arise from complex but comprehensible operations of practical reasoning. As this conviction has continued to ground my explorations of diverse religious traditions as well as my consideration of challenges in the domain of bioethics, I have undertaken to develop a total and coherent logic of moral judgment. Much has changed, of course, in the past quarter century, and we have (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Ronald M. Green (1997). The Journal of Religious Ethics, 1973-1994. Journal of Religious Ethics 25 (3):221 - 238.
    Reviewing the first twenty years of publication of the "Journal of Religious Ethics", the author examines the journal's pattern of growth, its niche in the array of scholarly journals, and its prospects. The author argues that JRE coincided with and stimulated the emergence of religious ethics as an independent scholarly field. He notes that it has been a valuable resource for philosophical analyses of religious ethics, has virtually created the field of comparative religious ethics, and has provided considerable impetus for (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Ronald M. Green, Wendy J. Fibison & Mark R. Hughes (1997). Planned Parenthood. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 6 (1):100.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Ronald Michael Green (1997). Nhgri's Intramural Ethics Experiment. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 7 (2):181-189.
  49. Charles R. MacKay, Ronald M. Green, Wendy J. Fibison & Mark R. Hughes (1997). Genethics: “Planned Parenthood”. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 6 (1):100-105.
    This case is another in a series intended to highlight the new questions emerging from advances in mapping the human genome and the application of genetic findings to clinical practice. The National Human Genome Research Institute, a component of the National Institutes of Health, by law is directed to designate a portion of its annual budget to furthering understanding of the ethical, legal, and social questions emerging from research on the human genome. As part of the effort, the Institute supports (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Franklin I. Gamwell, Garrett Barden & Ronald M. Green (1996). Review: On "Recovering Moral Philosophy": An Exchange. [REVIEW] Journal of Religious Ethics 24 (1):193 - 204.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 91