See also:
  1. Ronald Pisaturo (2011). The Longevity Argument. self.
    J. Richard Gott III (1993) has used the “Copernican principle” to derive a probability density function for the total longevity of any phenomenon, based solely on the phenomenon’s past longevity. John Leslie (1996) and others have used an apparently similar probabilistic argument, the “Doomsday Argument,” to claim that conventional predictions of longevity must be adjusted, based on Bayes’ Theorem, in favor of shorter longevities. Here I show that Gott’s arguments are flawed and contradictory, but that one of his conclusions—his delta (...)
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  2. David Atkinson, Jeanne Peijnenburg, Theo Kuipers, William T. Wojtach, Erik Curiel & Ronald Pisaturo (2009). 1. How to Confirm the Conjunction of Disconfirmed Hypotheses How to Confirm the Conjunction of Disconfirmed Hypotheses (Pp. 1-21). [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 76 (1).
     
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  3. Ronald Pisaturo (2009). Past Longevity as Evidence for the Future. Philosophy of Science 76 (1):73-100.
    Gott ( 1993 ) has used the ‘Copernican principle’ to derive a probability distribution for the total longevity of any phenomenon, based solely on the phenomenon’s past longevity. Leslie ( 1996 ) and others have used an apparently similar probabilistic argument, the ‘Doomsday Argument’, to claim that conventional predictions of longevity must be adjusted, based on Bayes’s Theorem, in favor of shorter longevities. Here I show that Gott’s arguments are flawed and contradictory, but that one of his conclusions is plausible (...)
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