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  1. Rosalyn Diprose (2013). Corporeal Interdependence: From Vulnerability to Dwelling in Ethical Community. Substance 42 (3):185-204.
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  2. Rosalyn Diprose (2012). Continental Philosophy: Thinking the Corporeal with the Political. Southern Journal of Philosophy 50 (2):220-233.
    This paper provides a genealogy of the emergence of one thread of continental philosophy—“thinking the corporeal with the political”—from its roots in the “French readings” of key philosophers during the 1960s and 1970s to its development outside of Europe. This involves characterizing continental philosophy as a style of thinking that is historical, creative, and ontological. As the genealogy takes in the French readings of Nietzsche and a range of developments such as corporeal feminisms, biopolitical analysis, and conceptions of political community, (...)
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  3. Rosalyn Diprose (2011). Building and Belonging Amid the Plight of Dwelling. Angelaki 16 (4):59 - 72.
    Angelaki, Volume 16, Issue 4, Page 59-72, December 2011.
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  4. Rosalyn Diprose (2010). Dissensus, Melancholic Nationalism, and Biopolitics in the Work of Ewa Ziarek. Philosophy Today 54 (Supplement):43-50.
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  5. Rosalyn Diprose (2010). Review of Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Institution and Passivity: Course Notes From the Collège De France (1954-1955). [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (11).
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  6. Rosalyn Diprose (2010). The Body Intermediating Community. In Henk Oosterling & Ewa Płonowska Ziarek (eds.), Intermedialities: Philosophy, Arts, Politics. Lexington Books.
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  7. Hugh J. Silverman, Louise Burchill, Jean-Luc Nancy, Laurens ten Kate, Luce Irigaray, Elaine P. Miller, George Smith, Peter Schwenger, Bernadette Wegenstein, Rosi Braidotti, Rosalyn Diprose, Dorota Glowacka, Heinz Kimmerle, Purushottama Bilimoria, Sally Percival Wood & Slavoj Z.¡ iz¡ek (2010). Intermedialities: Philosophy, Arts, Politics. Lexington Books.
  8. Rosalyn Diprose (2009). Philosophy and Love: From Plato to Popular Culture by Linnell Secomb. Hypatia 24 (4):238-240.
  9. Rosalyn Diprose (2009). Towards an Ethico-Politics of the Posthuman: Foucault and Merleau-Ponty. Parrhesia 8:7-19.
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  10. Rosalyn Diprose (2009). Women's Bodies Giving Time for Hospitality. Hypatia 24 (2):142 - 163.
    This paper explores the gendered and temporal dimensions of the political ontology of hospitality that Derrida has developed from Levinas's philosophy. The claim is that, while hospitality per se takes time, the more that hospitality becomes conditional under conservative political forces, the more that the time it takes is given by women without acknowledgment or support. The analysis revisits Hannah Arendt's claim that central to the human condition and democratic plurality is disclosure of "natality" (innovation or the birth of the (...)
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  11. Rosalyn Diprose (2008). Arendt and Nietzsche on Responsibility and Futurity. Philosophy and Social Criticism 34 (6):617-642.
    This article compares Nietzsche's and Arendt's critiques of the juridical concept of responsibility (that emphasizes duty and blame) with the aim of deriving an account of responsibility appropriate for our time. It examines shared ground in their radical approaches to responsibility: by basing personal responsibility in conscience that expresses a self open to an undetermined future, rather than conscience determined by prevailing moral norms, they make a connection between a failure of personal responsibility and the way a totalizing politics jeopardizes (...)
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  12. Rosalyn Diprose (2003). Here I Am by the Grace of the Other and Politics Is in Disgrace. Studies in Practical Philosophy 3 (1):22-37.
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  13. Rosalyn Diprose (2003). Here I Am by the Grace of the Other and Politics Is in Disgrace: Levinas and Postcolonialism.". Studies in Practical Philosophy 3 (1):20.
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  14. Rosalyn Diprose (2002). Corporeal Generosity: On Giving with Nietzsche, Merleau-Ponty, and Levinas. State University of New York Press.
    Challenges the accepted model, and builds a politically sensitive notion of generosity.
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  15. Rosalyn Diprose (2001). Bearing Witness to Cultural Difference, with Apology to Levinas. Angelaki 6 (2):125 – 135.
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  16. Rosalyn Diprose (2000). What is (Feminist) Philosophy? Hypatia 15 (2):115-132.
    : What makes us think, and what makes us think as feminists? In seeking to answer these questions, this paper draws on both Deleuze and Guattari's account of the creation of concepts, and feminist thought on feminist thinking, before suggesting with Levinas that our relation to ideas is primarily affective. Via further engagement with Levinas, I argue that it is the relation to the other which provokes and produces thought; models of autonomous theorizing are thereby supplanted by the teaching of (...)
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  17. Rosalyn Diprose (1999). From Desire to Power. [REVIEW] Human Studies 22 (1):125-131.
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  18. Rosalyn Diprose (1999). Review: From Desire to Power. [REVIEW] Human Studies 22 (1):125 - 131.
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  19. Rosalyn Diprose (1998). Generosity: Between Love and Desire. Hypatia 13 (1):1 - 20.
    "Safe sex" discourse attempts to protect women from dangers assumed inherent in erotic life, such as domination, submissiveness, and loss of freedom and self-control. However, Beauvoir's and Merleau-Ponty's revision of Sartre's ontology suggests that erotic life involves a kind of generosity that transforms existence; sex neither liberates personal existence nor poses a necessary threat to women's freedom. I also reconsider the conditions under which sex is assumed to involve a violation of being.
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  20. Rosalyn Diprose (1995). The Body Biomedical Ethics Forgets. In Paul A. Komesaroff (ed.), Troubled Bodies: Critical Perspectives on Postmodernism, Medical Ethics, and the Body. Duke University Press. 202--221.
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  21. Rosalyn Diprose (1994). The Bodies of Women: Ethics, Embodiment, and Sexual Difference. Routledge.
    In The Bodies of Women , Rosalyn Diprose argues that traditional approaches to ethics both perpetuate and remain blind to the mechanisms of the subordination of women. She shows that injustice against women begins in the ways that social discourses and practices place women's embodied existence as improper and secondary to men. She intervenes into debates about sexual difference, ethics, philosophies of the body and theories of self in order to develop a new ethics which places sexual difference at the (...)
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  22. Rosalyn Diprose (1991). In Excess: The Body and the Habit of Sexual Difference. Hypatia 6 (3):156 - 171.
    Through a re-reading of Antigone, I offer a critique of Hegel's use of the story to illustrate the unity which emerges from the representation of sexual difference in ethical life. Using Hegel's own account of habits, as the mechanism by which the body becomes a sign of the self, I argue that the pretense of social unity assumes the proper construction and representation of one body only. This critique is brought to bear upon contemporary moves towards a post-Hegelian ethics of (...)
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