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  1. Rosamund Scott (2007). Choosing Between Possible Lives: Law and Ethics of Prenatal and Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis. Hart.
  2. Rosamund Scott (2006). Choosing Between Possible Lives: Legal and Ethical Issues in Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 26 (1):153-178.
    This article critically appraises the current legal scope of the principal applications of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD). This relatively new technique, which is available to some parents undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF) treatment, aims to ensure that a child is not born with a seemingly undesirable genetic condition. The question addressed here is whether there should be serious reasons to test for genetic conditions in embryos in order to be able to select between them. The Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (...)
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  3. Rosamund Scott (2005). Prenatal Testing, Reproductive Autonomy, and Disability Interests. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 14 (1):65-82.
    The issue of prenatal testing and selective abortion has never received open public appraisal. This is somewhat regrettable. The interest in this area, however, is rapidly growing. In part this is a result of concerns about the rate of development in genetic knowledge and questions as to its application. For instance, there will be a huge increase in the scope of conditions or features for which we will be able to screen, some of which could hardly be described as significant. (...)
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  4. Rosamund Scott (2000). Autonomy and Connectedness: A Re-Evaluation of Georgetown and its Progeny. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 28 (1):55-66.
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  5. Rosamund Scott (2000). The Pregnant Woman and the Good Samaritan: Can a Woman Have a Duty to Undergo a Caesarean Section? Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 20 (3):407-436.
    Although a pregnant woman can now refuse any medical treatment needed by the fetus, the Court of Appeal has acknowledged that ethical dilemmas remain, adverting to the inappropriateness of legal compulsion of presumed moral duties in this context. This leaves the impression of an uncomfortable split between the ethics and the law. The notion of a pregnant woman refusing medical treatment needed by the fetus is troubling and it helps little simply to assert that she has a legal right to (...)
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