Search results for 'Rosamund Stone Zander' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  2
    Rosamund Stone Zander (2002). The Art of Possibility. Penguin Books.
    Presenting twelve breakthrough practices for bringing creativity into all human endeavors, The Art of Possibility is the dynamic product of an extraordinary partnership. The Art of Possibility combines Benjamin Zander's experience as conductor of the Boston Philharmonic and his talent as a teacher and communicator with psychotherapist Rosamund Stone Zander's genius for designing innovative paradigms for personal and professional fulfillment. The authors' harmoniously interwoven perspectives provide a deep sense of the powerful role that the notion of (...)
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  2.  11
    R. L. Stone (1968). Book Review:Legal System and Lawyers' Reasonings. Julius Stone. [REVIEW] Ethics 78 (4):322-.
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  3. Hannah M. Stone, Gloria Stone Aitken, Hilary Hill, Aquiles J. Sobrero & Abraham Stone (1970). A Marriage Manual a Practical Guide-Book to Sex and Marriage, by Hannah M. Stone and Abraham Stone.
     
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  4. Ernie Lepore & Matthew Stone (2014). Imagination and Convention: Distinguishing Grammar and Inference in Language. OUP Oxford.
    How do hearers manage to understand speakers? And how do speakers manage to shape hearers' understanding? Lepore and Stone show that standard views about the workings of semantics and pragmatics are unsatisfactory. They advance an alternative view which better captures what is going on in linguistic communication.
     
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  5.  72
    Alison Stone (2006). Luce Irigaray and the Philosophy of Sexual Difference. Cambridge University Press.
    Alison Stone offers a feminist defence of the idea that sexual difference is natural, providing a new interpretation of the later philosophy of Luce Irigaray. She defends Irigaray's unique form of essentialism and her rethinking of the relationship between nature and culture, showing how Irigaray's ideas can be reconciled with Judith Butler's performative conception of gender, through rethinking sexual difference in relation to German Romantic philosophies of nature. This is the first sustained attempt to connect feminist conceptions of embodiment (...)
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  6.  6
    Christopher D. Stone (2010). Should Trees Have Standing?: Law, Morality, and the Environment. OUP Usa.
    Originally published in 1972, Should Trees Have Standing? was a rallying point for the then burgeoning environmental movement, launching a worldwide debate on the basic nature of legal rights that reached the U.S. Supreme Court. Now, in the 35th anniversary edition of this remarkably influential book, Christopher D. Stone updates his original thesis and explores the impact his ideas have had on the courts, the academy, and society as a whole. At the heart of the book is an eminently (...)
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  7.  38
    Alison Stone (2013). Feminism, Psychoanalysis, and Maternal Subjectivity. Routledge.
    In this book, Alison Stone develops a feminist approach to maternal subjectivity. Stone argues that in the West the self has often been understood in opposition to the maternal body, so that one must separate oneself from the mother and maternal care-givers on whom one depended in childhood to become a self or, in modernity, an autonomous subject. These assumptions make it difficult to be a mother and a subject, an autonomous creator of meaning. Insofar as mothers nonetheless (...)
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  8.  8
    Anna Stone & Tim Valentine (2005). Accuracy of Familiarity Decisions to Famous Faces Perceived Without Awareness Depends on Attitude to the Target Person and on Response Latency. Consciousness and Cognition 14 (2):351-376.
    Stone and Valentine presented masked 17 ms faces in simultaneous pairs of one famous and one unfamiliar face. Accuracy in selecting the famous face was higher when the famous person was regarded as “good” or liked than when regarded as “evil” or disliked. Experiment 1 attempted to replicate this phenomenon, but produced a different pattern of results. Experiment 2 investigated alternative explanations and found evidence supporting only the effect of response latency: responses made soon after stimulus onset were more (...)
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  9.  7
    Lynda Stone (2011). Outliers, Cheese, and Rhizomes: Variations on a Theme of Limitation. Educational Theory 61 (6):647-658.
    All research has limitations, for example, from paradigm, concept, theory, tradition, and discipline. In this article Lynda Stone describes three exemplars that are variations on limitation and are “extraordinary” in that they change what constitutes future research in each domain. Malcolm Gladwell's present day study of outliers makes a statistical term into a sociological concept. Carlo Ginzburg's study of a sixteenth-century miller who challenges Church doctrine initiates the field of microhistory. Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari's philosophy of the rhizome (...)
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  10. Alison Stone (2014). Feminism, Psychoanalysis, and Maternal Subjectivity. Routledge.
    In this book, Alison Stone develops a feminist approach to maternal subjectivity. Stone argues that in the West the self has often been understood in opposition to the maternal body, so that one must separate oneself from the mother and maternal care-givers on whom one depended in childhood to become a self or, in modernity, an autonomous subject. These assumptions make it difficult to be a mother and a subject, an autonomous creator of meaning. Insofar as mothers nonetheless (...)
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  11. Alison Stone (2011). Feminism, Psychoanalysis, and Maternal Subjectivity. Routledge.
    In this book, Alison Stone develops a feminist approach to maternal subjectivity. Stone argues that in the West the self has often been understood in opposition to the maternal body, so that one must separate oneself from the mother and maternal care-givers on whom one depended in childhood to become a self or, in modernity, an autonomous subject. These assumptions make it difficult to be a mother and a subject, an autonomous creator of meaning. Insofar as mothers nonetheless (...)
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  12. Ronald H. Stone (2008). Moral Reflections on Foreign Policy in a Religious War. Lexington Books.
    Stone argues that religion must be understood in its connections with world politics for the successful conduct of foreign policy. Without peace among religions, there can be no peace, and without understanding the role of religion in politics, there can be neither peace nor successful foreign policy.
     
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  13.  12
    M. W. F. Stone & Jonathan Wolff (eds.) (2000). The Proper Ambition of Science. Routledge.
    What is the proper relation between the scientific worldview and other parts or aspects of human knowledge and experience? Can any science aim at "complete coverage" of the world, and if it does, will it undermine--in principle or by tendency--other attempts to describe or understand the world? Should morality, theology and other areas resist or be protected from scientific treatment? Questions of this sort have been of pressing philosophical concern since antiquity. The Proper Ambition of Science presents ten particular case (...)
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  14. Jim Stone (1993). Cogito Ergo Sum. Journal of Philosophy 60 (9):462-468.
  15. Martin Davies & Tony Stone (eds.) (1995). Folk Psychology: The Theory of Mind Debate. Blackwell.
    Many philosophers and psychologists argue that normal adult human beings possess a primitive or 'folk' psychological theory. Recently, however, this theory has come under challenge from the simulation alternative. This alternative view says that human bings are able to predict and explain each others' actions by using the resources of their own minds to simuate the psychological etiology of the actions of others. The thirteen essays in this volume present the foundations of theory of mind debate, and are accompanied by (...)
     
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  16.  30
    Jennifer L. Kisamore, Thomas H. Stone & I. M. Jawahar (2007). Academic Integrity: The Relationship Between Individual and Situational Factors on Misconduct Contemplations. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 75 (4):381 - 394.
    Recent, well-publicized scandals, involving unethical conduct have rekindled interest in academic misconduct. Prior studies of academic misconduct have focussed exclusively on situational factors (e.g., integrity culture, honor codes), demographic variables or personality constructs. We contend that it is important to also examine how␣these classes of variables interact to influence perceptions of and intentions relating to academic misconduct. In a sample of 217 business students, we examined how integrity culture interacts with Prudence and Adjustment to explain variance in estimated frequency of (...)
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  17. Jim Stone (1984). Dreaming and Certainty. Philosophical Studies 45 (May):353-368.
    I argue that being wide awake is an epistemic virtue which enables me to recognize immediately that I'm wide awake. Also I argue that dreams are imaginings and that the wide awake mind can immediately discern the difference between imaginings and vivid sense experience. Descartes need only pinch himself.
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  18.  84
    Tony Stone & Andrew W. Young (1997). Delusions and Brain Injury: The Philosophy and Psychology of Belief. Mind and Language 12 (3-4):327-64.
    Circumscribed delusional beliefs can follow brain injury. We suggest that these involve anomalous perceptual experiences created by a deficit to the person's perceptual system, and misinterpretation of these experiences due to biased reasoning. We use the Capgras delusion (the claim that one or more of one's close relatives has been replaced by an exact replica or impostor) to illustrate this argument. Our account maintains that people voicing this delusion suffer an impairment that leads to faces being perceived as drained of (...)
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  19. Philip Gerrans & Valerie E. Stone (2008). Generous or Parsimonious Cognitive Architecture? Cognitive Neuroscience and Theory of Mind. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 59 (2):121-141.
    Recent work in cognitive neuroscience on the child's Theory of Mind (ToM) has pursued the idea that the ability to metarepresent mental states depends on a domain-specific cognitive subystem implemented in specific neural circuitry: a Theory of Mind Module. We argue that the interaction of several domain-general mechanisms and lower-level domain-specific mechanisms accounts for the flexibility and sophistication of behavior, which has been taken to be evidence for a domain-specific ToM module. This finding is of more general interest since it (...)
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  20.  25
    Peter Stone (2007). Why Lotteries Are Just. Journal of Political Philosophy 15 (3):276–295.
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  21. Jerome A. Stone (2002). Religious Naturalism and the Religion-Science Dialogue: A Minimalist View. Zygon 37 (2):381-394.
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  22. Jim Stone (2005). Why There Still Are No People. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 70 (1):174-191.
    This paper argues that there are no people. If identity isn't what matters in survival, psychological connectedness isn't what matters either. Further, fissioning cases do not support the claim that connectedness is what matters. I consider Peter Unger's view that what matters is a continuous physical realization of a core psychology. I conclude that if identity isn't what matters in survival, nothing matters. This conclusion is deployed to argue that there are no people. Objections to Eliminativism are considered, especially that (...)
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  23. Jim Stone (2007). Contextualism and Warranted Assertion. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 88 (1):92–113.
    Contextualists offer "high-low standards" practical cases to show that a variety of knowledge standards are in play in different ordinary contexts. These cases show nothing of the sort, I maintain. However Keith DeRose gives an ingenious argument that standards for knowledge do go up in high-stakes cases. According to the knowledge account of assertion (Kn), only knowledge warrants assertion. Kn combined with the context sensitivity of assertability yields contextualism about knowledge. But is Kn correct? I offer a rival account (...)
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  24.  83
    Jerome A. Stone (2012). Spirituality for Naturalists. Zygon 47 (3):481-500.
    Abstract The views of eleven writers who develop a naturalized spirituality, from Baruch Spinoza and George Santayana to Sam Harris, André Comte-Sponville, Ursula Goodenough, and Sharon Welch and others are presented. Then the writer's own theory is developed. This is a pluralistic notion of sacredness, an adjective referring to unmanipulable events of overriding importance. The difficulties in using traditional religious words, such as God and spiritual are addressed.
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  25. Jim Stone (2005). Why Counterpart Theory and Four-Dimensionalism Are Incompatible. Analysis 65 (288):329–333.
  26. Matthew Stone, Interpreting Vague Utterances in Context.
    We use the interpretation of vague scalar predicates like small as an illustration of how systematic semantic models of dialogue context enable the derivation of useful, fine-grained utterance interpretations from radically underspeci- fied semantic forms. Because dialogue context suffices to determine salient alternative scales and relevant distinctions along these scales, we can infer implicit standards of comparison for vague scalar predicates through completely general pragmatics, yet closely constrain the intended meaning to within a natural range.
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  27. Ernest Lepore & Matthew Stone (2010). Against Metaphorical Meaning. Topoi 29 (2):165-180.
    The commonplace view about metaphorical interpretation is that it can be characterized in traditional semantic and pragmatic terms, thereby assimilating metaphor to other familiar uses of language. We will reject this view, and propose in its place the view that, though metaphors can issue in distinctive cognitive and discourse effects, they do so without issuing in metaphorical meaning and truth, and so, without metaphorical communication. Our inspiration derives from Donald Davidson’s critical arguments against metaphorical meaning and Richard Rorty’s exploration of (...)
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  28. Jim Stone (2000). Review of Eric Olson: 'The Human Animal: Personal Identity Without Psychology '. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research (No. 2):495-497.
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  29. Jim Stone (2009). Why Counterpart Theory and Modal Realism Are Incompatible. Analysis 69 (4):650-653.
    I find a lost wallet containing the owner's address and a lot of cash. Shall I keep it or return it? Suppose I have the ‘liberty of indifference’: whatever I do, I could have done otherwise. Indeed, part of what is meant in saying I act freely is that either way what I do is up to me. And let's allow this liberty requires that my choice is not a logical consequence of the past and natural laws. If I return (...)
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  30.  44
    Valerie E. Stone & Philip Gerrans (2006). Does the Normal Brain Have a Theory of Mind? Trends in Cognitive Sciences 10 (1):3-4.
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  31. Jim Stone (2005). Why Counterpart Theory and Three-Dimensionalism Are Incompatible. Analysis 65 (Jan):24-27.
  32. Jim Stone (2007). Persons Are Not Made of Temporal Parts. Analysis 67 (1):7–11.
  33. Jim Stone (1981). Hume on Identity: A Defense. Philosophical Studies 40 (2):275 - 282.
  34.  13
    Jerome Arthur Stone (2008). Religious Naturalism Today: The Rebirth of a Forgotten Alternative. State University of New York Press.
    Part I: The birth of religious naturalism -- Philosophical religious naturalism -- Theological religious naturalism -- Analyzing the issues -- Interlude religious naturalism in literature -- Part II: The rebirth of religious naturalism -- Sources of religious insight -- Current issues in religious naturalism -- Other current religious naturalists -- Conclusion: Living religiously as a naturalist.
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  35.  95
    Martin Davies & Tony Stone (2001). Mental Simulation, Tacit Theory, and the Threat of Collapse. Philosophical Topics 29 (1-2):127-73.
    According to the theory theory of folk psychology, our engagement in the folk psychological practices of prediction, interpretation and explanation draws on a rich body of knowledge about psychological matters. According to the simulation theory, in apparent contrast, a fundamental role is played by our ability to identify with another person in imagination and to replicate or re-enact aspects of the other person’s mental life. But amongst theory theorists, and amongst simulation theorists, there are significant differences of approach.
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  36. Jim Stone (2001). A Theory of Religion Revised. Religious Studies 37 (2):177-189.
    A (revised) account of what all and only religions have in common in virtue of which they are religions.
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  37. Jim Stone (2000). Skepticism as a Theory of Knowledge. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 60 (3):527-545.
    Skepticism about the external world may very well be correct, so the question is in order: what theory of knowledge flows from skepticism itself? The skeptic can give a relatively simple and intuitive account of knowledge by identifying it with indubitable certainty. Our everyday ‘I know that p’ claims, which typically are part of practical projects, deploy the ideal of knowledge to make assertions closely related to, but weaker than, knowledge claims. The truth of such claims is consistent with skepticism; (...)
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  38. Jerome A. Stone (2003). Varieties of Religious Naturalism. Zygon 38 (1):89-93.
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  39. Jim Stone (1994). Advance Directives, Autonomy and Unintended Death. Bioethics 8 (3):223–246.
    Advance directives typically have two defects. First, most advance directives fail to enable people to effectively avoid unwanted medical intervention. Second, most of them have the potential of ending your life in ways you never intended, years before you had to die.
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  40. Jim Stone (1994). Games and Family Resemblances. Philosophical Investigations 17 (No. 2): 435-443.
    An account of the feature all games share in virtue of which they are games.
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  41. Jim Stone (1998). Free Will as a Gift From God: A New Compatibilism. Philosophical Studies 92 (3):257-81.
    I argue that God could give us the robust power to do other than we do in a deterministic universe.
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  42. Jim Stone (2007). Pascal's Wager and the Persistent Vegetative State. Bioethics 21 (2):84–92.
    I argue that a version of Pascal's Wager applies to the persistent vegetative state with sufficient force that it ought to part of advance directives.
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  43. Jim Stone (2003). On Staying the Same. Analysis 63 (4):288–291.
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  44. Alison Stone (2012). Against Matricide: Rethinking Subjectivity and the Maternal Body. Hypatia 27 (1):118-138.
    In this article I critically re-examine Julia Kristeva's view that becoming a speaking subject requires psychical matricide: violent separation from the maternal body. I propose an alternative, non-matricidal conception of subjectivity, in part by drawing out anti-matricidal strands in Kristeva's own thought, including her view that early mother–child relations are triangular. Whereas she understands this triangle in terms of a first imaginary father, I re-interpret this triangle using Donald Winnicott's idea of potential space and Jessica Benjamin's idea of an intersubjective (...)
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  45.  15
    Brian C. Stone (1998). Nietzsche for Beginners. Cogito 12 (2):167-167.
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  46. Jerome A. Stone (2011). The Dance of Person and Place: One Interpretation of American Indian Philosophy. The Pluralist 6 (2):80-82.
    The aim of this book is to demonstrate that American Indians have a world-view that is consistent, intelligible, and legitimate. It is a deft and self-aware exemplification of the task of cross-cultural comparison. The overall strategy in the argument is to employ a modified version of Nelson Goodman’s notion of world-making and then construct a simplified model of the American Indian worldview. Norton-Smith accomplishes this difficult task and in the process modifies Goodman in a realist direction, making a strong case (...)
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    Alison Stone (2005). Towards a Genealogical Feminism: A Reading of Judith Butler's Political Thought. Contemporary Political Theory 4 (1):4-24.
    Judith Butler's contribution to feminist political thought is usually approached in terms of her concept of performativity, according to which gender exists only insofar as it is ritualistically and repetitively performed, creating permanent possibilities for performing gender in new and transgressive ways. In this paper, I argue that Butler's politics of performativity is more fundamentally grounded in the concept of genealogy, which she adapts from Foucault and, ultimately, Nietzsche. Butler understands women to have a genealogy: to be located within a (...)
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  48. Jim Stone (1988). Parfit and the Buddha: Why There Are No People. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 48 (March):519-32.
  49. Abraham D. Stone (1994). Does the Bohm Theory Solve the Measurement Problem? Philosophy of Science 61 (2):250-266.
    When classical mechanics is seen as the short-wavelength limit of quantum mechanics (i.e., as the limit of geometrical optics), it becomes clear just how serious and all-pervasive the measurement problem is. This formulation also leads us into the Bohm theory. But this theory has drawbacks: its nonuniqueness, in particular, and its nonlocality. I argue that these both reflect an underlying problem concerning information, which is actually a deeper version of the measurement problem itself.
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  50. Jim Stone Stone (2005). Why There Are Still No People. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 70.
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