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  1. Rosemary Rodd (1996). Evolutionary Ethics and the Status of Non-Human Animals. Journal of Applied Philosophy 13 (1):63-72.
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  2. Rosemary Rodd (1994). Sociobiology and the Moral Status of Nonhuman Animals. Between the Species 10 (3):6.
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  3. Rosemary Rodd (1990). Biology, Ethics, and Animals. Oxford University Press.
    This book utilizes both philosophical and biological approaches to address the various attitudes in the debate over animal rights. Rodd justifies ethical concern within a framework that is firmly grounded on evolutionary theory, and provides detailed discussion of practical situations in which ethical decisions have to be made. For moral philosophers, the book offers a biological background to the ethical questions involved. Biologists will find that it provides an approach to the ethics of animal rights which is rooted in biological (...)
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  4. Rosemary Rodd (1987). The Challenge of Biological Determinism. Philosophy 62 (239):84 - 93.
    Biological theories about the nature and origin of ethics are important, j both because they may be largely true, and because distorted versions are sometimes effective in moulding people's ethical beliefs in curious i ways. The pernicious effects which sometimes follow the application of biology to ethics stem from an assortment of misinterpretations, while, correctly interpreted, even the most extreme biological determinism need not be supposed to diminish the worth of conscious individuals, nor be incompatible with genuinely ethical behaviour.
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  5. Rosemary Rodd (1985). Pacifism and Absolute Rights for Animals: A Comparison of Difficulties. Journal of Applied Philosophy 2 (1):53-61.