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Profile: Michael Eric Rosen (Harvard University)
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Profile: Steven M. Rosen (City University of New York)
Profile: Melanie Rosen (Macquarie University)
Profile: Jacob Rosen (Humboldt-University, Berlin)
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  1. Gideon Rosen (2010). Metaphysical Dependence: Grounding and Reduction. In Bob Hale & Aviv Hoffmann (eds.), Modality: Metaphysics, Logic, and Epistemology. Oxford University Press 109--36.
  2. Gideon Rosen (2015). Real Definition. Analytic Philosophy 56 (3):189-209.
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  3. Plamen L. Simeonov, Arran Gare, Seven M. Rosen & Denis Noble (forthcoming). Editorial. Special Issue on Integral Biomathics: Life Sciences, Mathematics and Phenomenological Philosophy. Journal Progress in Biophysics and Molecular Biology 119 (2).
    The is the Editorial of the 2015 JPBMB Special Issue on Integral Biomathics: Life Sciences, Mathematics and Phenomenological Philosophy.
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  4. Cian Dorr & Gideon Rosen (2002). Composition as a Fiction. In Richard Gale (ed.), The Blackwell Companion to Metaphysics. Blackwell 151--174.
    Region R Question: How many objects — entities, things — are contained in R? Ignore the empty space. Our question might better be put, 'How many material objects does R contain?' Let's stipulate that A, B and C are metaphysical atoms: absolutely simple entities with no parts whatsoever besides themselves. So you don't have to worry about counting a particle's top half and bottom half as different objects. Perhaps they are 'point-particles', with no length, width or breadth. Perhaps they are (...)
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  5. Claudia L. R. Gonzalez, Kelly J. Mills, Inge Genee, Fangfang Li, Noella Piquette, Nicole Rosen & Robbin Gibb (2014). Getting the Right Grasp on Executive Function. Frontiers in Psychology 5.
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  6. Stanley Rosen (1965). The Role of Eros in Plato's "Republic". Review of Metaphysics 18 (3):452-475.
  7. John P. Burgess & Gideon A. Rosen (1997). A Subject with No Object: Strategies for Nominalistic Interpretation of Mathematics. Oxford University Press.
    Numbers and other mathematical objects are exceptional in having no locations in space or time or relations of cause and effect. This makes it difficult to account for the possibility of the knowledge of such objects, leading many philosophers to embrace nominalism, the doctrine that there are no such objects, and to embark on ambitious projects for interpreting mathematics so as to preserve the subject while eliminating its objects. This book cuts through a host of technicalities that have obscured previous (...)
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  8.  48
    Steven M. Rosen (2015). Why Natural Science Needs Phenomenological Philosophy. Progress in Biophysics and Molecular Biology 119:257-269.
    Through an exploration of theoretical physics, this paper suggests the need for regrounding natural science in phenomenological philosophy. To begin, the philosophical roots of the prevailing scientific paradigm are traced to the thinking of Plato, Descartes, and Newton. The crisis in modern science is then investigated, tracking developments in physics, science's premier discipline. Einsteinian special relativity is interpreted as a response to the threat of discontinuity implied by the Michelson-Morley experiment, a challenge to classical objectivism that Einstein sought to counteract. (...)
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  9.  69
    Gideon Rosen (2015). A Puzzle Postponed. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 4 (3):198-201.
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  10. Gideon Rosen (1990). Modal Fictionalism. Mind 99 (395):327-354.
  11. Robert Rosen (1991). Life Itself a Comprehensive Inquiry Into the Nature, Origin, and Fabrication of Life. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  12. Gideon Rosen (2004). Skepticism About Moral Responsibility. Philosophical Perspectives 18 (1):295–313.
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  13. Gideon Rosen (1995). Modal Fictionalism Fixed. Analysis 55 (2):67-73.
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  14. Gideon Rosen (2008). Kleinbart the Oblivious and Other Tales of Ignorance and Responsibility. Journal of Philosophy 105 (10):591-610.
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  15. Gideon Rosen (2002). Culpability and Ignorance. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 103 (1):61–84.
    When a person acts from ignorance, he is culpable for his action only if he is culpable for the ignorance from which he acts. The paper defends the view that this principle holds, not just for actions done from ordinary factual ignorance, but also for actions done from moral ignorance. The question is raised whether the principle extends to action done from ignorance about what one has most reason to do. It is tentatively proposed that the principle holds in full (...)
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  16. Robert Rosen (2000). Essays on Life Itself. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  17. Albert Einstein, Boris Podolsky & Nathan Rosen (1935). Can Quantum-Mechanical Description of Physical Reality Be Considered Complete? Physical Review (47):777-780.
  18. Gideon Rosen (2007). The Case Against Epistemic Relativism: Reflections on Chapter 6 of Fear of Knowledge. Episteme 4 (1):10-29.
    According to one sort of epistemic relativist, normative epistemic claims (e.g., evidence E justifies hypothesis H) are never true or false simpliciter, but only relative to one or another epistemic system. In chapter 6 of Fear of Knowledge, Paul Boghossian objects to this view on the ground that its central notions cannot be explained, and that it cannot account for the normativity of epistemic discourse. This paper explores how the dogged relativist might respond.
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  19. Gideon Rosen (2001). Nominalism, Naturalism, Epistemic Relativism. Noûs 35 (s15):69 - 91.
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  20. David Lewis & Gideon Rosen (2003). Postscript to ”Things Qua Truthmakers': Negative Existentials. In Hallvard Lillehammer & Gonzalo Rodriguez-Pereyra (eds.), Real Metaphysics: Essays in Honour of D. H. Mellor. Routledge 39-42.
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  21. Gideon Rosen, Abstract Objects. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  22. Georg Stenberg, Magnus Lindgren, Mikael Johansson, Andreas Olsson & Ingmar Rosén (2000). Semantic Processing Without Conscious Identification: Evidence From Event-Related Potentials. Journal of Experimental Psychology 26 (4):973-1004.
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  23.  85
    Gideon Rosen (2006). The Limits of Contingency. In Fraser MacBride (ed.), Identity and Modality. Oxford University Press 13--39.
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  24. Gideon Rosen (1994). What is Constructive Empiricism? Philosophical Studies 74 (2):143 - 178.
    Van Fraassen defines constructive empiricism as the view that science aims to produce empirically adequate theories. But this account has been misunderstood. Constructive empiricism in not, as it seems, a description of the intentional features of scientific practice, nor is it a normative prescription for their revision. It is rather a fiction about the practice of science that van Fraassen displays in the interests of a broader empiricism. The paper concludes with a series of arguments designed to show that constructive (...)
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  25. Nicholas J. J. Smith & Gideon Rosen (2004). Worldly Indeterminacy: A Rough Guide. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 82 (1):185 – 198.
    This paper defends the idea that there might be vagueness or indeterminacy in the world itself--as opposed to merely in our representations of the world--against the charges of incoherence and unintelligibility. First we consider the idea that the world might contain vague properties and relations ; we show that this idea is already implied by certain well-understood views concerning the semantics of vague predicates (most notably the fuzzy view). Next we consider the idea that the world might contain vague objects (...)
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  26. Melanie Rosen & John Sutton (2013). Self‐Representation and Perspectives in Dreams. Philosophy Compass 8 (11):1041-1053.
    Integrative and naturalistic philosophy of mind can both learn from and contribute to the contemporary cognitive sciences of dreaming. Two related phenomena concerning self-representation in dreams demonstrate the need to bring disparate fields together. In most dreams, the protagonist or dream self who experiences and actively participates in dream events is or represents the dreamer: but in an intriguing minority of cases, self-representation in dreams is displaced, disrupted, or even absent. Working from dream reports in established databanks, we examine two (...)
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  27. Gideon Rosen (2001). Brandom on Modality, Normativity, and Intentionality. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 63 (3):611-23.
  28. Eckart Förster & Michael Rosen (eds.) (2012). Opus Postumum. Cambridge University Press.
    This volume is the first ever English translation of Kant's last major work, the so-called Opus Postumum, a work Kant himself described as his 'chef d'oeuvre' and as the keystone of his entire philosophical system. It occupied him for more than the last decade of his life. Begun with the intention of providing a 'transition from the metaphysical foundations of natural science to physics,' Kant's reflections take him far beyond the problem he initially set out to solve. In fact, he (...)
     
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  29. Gideon Rosen (2009). Might Kantian Contractualism Be the Supreme Principle of Morality? Ratio 22 (1):78-97.
    According to Parfit, the best version of Kantian ethics takes as its central principle Kantian Contractualism: the thesis that everyone ought to follow the principles whose universal acceptance everyone could rationally will. This paper examines that thesis, identifies a class of annoying counterexamples, and suggests that when Kantian Contractualism is modified in response to these examples, the resulting principle is too complex and ad hoc to serve as the 'supreme principle of morality'.
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  30.  83
    Gideon Rosen (1994). Objectivity and Modern Idealism: What is the Question? In John O'Leary-Hawthorne & Michaelis Michael (eds.), Philosophy in Mind. Kluwer 277--319.
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  31. Gideon Rosen (1998). Blackburn's Essays in Quasi-Realism. Noûs 32 (3):386-405.
  32. Daniel Carey, Stuart Rosen, Saloni Krishnan, Marcus T. Pearce, Alex Shepherd, Jennifer Aydelott & Frederic Dick (2015). Generality and Specificity in the Effects of Musical Expertise on Perception and Cognition. Cognition 137:81-105.
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  33.  95
    Mark Israelit & Nathan Rosen (1996). A Weyl-Dirac Geometric Particle. Foundations of Physics 26 (5):585-594.
    A spherically symmetric entity with the Weyl-Dirac geometry holding in its interior is investigated. The structure is determined by the presence of the Dirac gauge function, which creates a mass density. Two models are obtained, one that can describe a cosmic body, the other an elementary particle.
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  34.  44
    Gideon Rosen (2014). I—Culpability and Duress: A Case Study. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 88 (1):69-90.
    The paper examines the conditions under which we are responsible for actions performed under duress, focusing on a real case in which a soldier was compelled at gunpoint to participate in the massacre of civilian prisoners. The case stands for a class of cases in which the compelled act is neither clearly justified nor clearly excused on grounds of temporary incapacity, but in which it is nonetheless plausible that the agent is not morally blameworthy. The theoretical challenge is to identify (...)
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  35.  85
    N. Rosen (1994). A Classical Proca Particle. Foundations of Physics 24 (12):1689-1695.
    An elementary particle is described as a spherically symmetric solution of the Proca equations and the Einstein general relativity equations. The mass is found to be of the order of the Planck mass. If the motion of its center of mass is determined by the Dirac equations, it has a spin 1/2.This work is parallel to an earlier one involving the Klein- Gordon equation.
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  36. William G. Lycan, Penelope Maddy, Gideon Rosen & Nathan Salmon (2001). Externalism, Naturalism, Nominalism, and Mathematics. Philosophical Perspectives 15:17-117.
     
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  37.  26
    In Aristophanes & Ralph M. Rosen (2008). Badness and Intentionality. In I. Sluiter & Ralph Mark Rosen (eds.), Kakos: Badness and Anti-Value in Classical Antiquity. Brill 307--143.
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  38.  54
    G. Rosen (1999). Review. Naturalism in Mathematics. Penelope Maddy. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 50 (3):467-474.
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  39.  34
    Gideon Rosen (2012). Normativity by Judith Jarvis Thomson. [REVIEW] Journal of Philosophy 109 (11):676-681.
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  40. Frederick Rosen (1973). Obligation and Friendship in Plato's Crito. Political Theory 1 (3):307-316.
  41.  75
    Steven M. Rosen (2013). Bridging the “Two Cultures”: Merleau-Ponty and the Crisis in Modern Physics. Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 9 (2):1-12.
    This paper brings to light the significance of Merleau-Ponty’s thinking for contemporary physics. The point of departure is his 1956–57 Collège de France lectures on Nature, coupled with his reflections on the crisis in modern physics appearing in THE VISIBLE AND THE INVISIBLE. Developments in theoretical physics after his death are then explored and a deepening of the crisis is disclosed. The upshot is that physics’ intractable problems of uncertainty and subject-object interaction can only be addressed by shifting its philosophical (...)
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  42.  74
    Nathan Rosen (1984). A Semiclassical Interpretation of Wave Mechanics. Foundations of Physics 14 (7):579-605.
    The single-particle wave function ψ=ReiS/h has been interpreted classically: At a given point the particle momentum is ▽S, and the relative particle density in an ensemble is R 2 . It is first proposed to modify this interpretation by assuming that physical variables undergo rapid fluctuations, so that ▽S is the average of the momentum over a short time interval. However, it appears that this is not enough. It seems necessary to assume that the density also fluctuates. The fluctuations are (...)
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  43. Gideon Rosen (1993). The Refutation of Nominalism (?). Philosophical Topics 21 (2):141--86.
  44.  77
    Gideon Rosen (1993). A Problem for Fictionalism About Possible Worlds. Analysis 53 (2):71 - 81.
    Fictionalism about possible worlds is the view that talk about worlds in the analysis of modality is to be construed as ontologically innocent discourse about the content of a fiction. Versions of the view have been defended by D M Armstrong (in "A Combinatorial Theory of Possibility") and by myself (in "Modal Fictionalism', "Mind" 99, July 1990). The present note argues that fictionalist accounts of modality (both Armstrong's version and my own) fail to serve the fictionalists ontological purposes because they (...)
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  45.  67
    Nathan Rosen (1986). Quantum Particles and Classical Particles. Foundations of Physics 16 (8):687-700.
    The relation between wave mechanics and classical mechanics is reviewed, and it is stressed that the latter cannot be regarded as the limit of the former as ℏ →0. The motion of a classical particle (or ensemble of particles) is described by means of a Schrödinger-like equation that was found previously. A system of a quantum particle and a classical particle is investigated (1) for an interaction that leads to stationary states with discrete energies and (2) for an interaction that (...)
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  46. Steven M. Rosen (2008). Quantum Gravity and Phenomenological Philosophy. Foundations of Physics 38 (6):556-582.
    The central thesis of this paper is that contemporary theoretical physics is grounded in philosophical presuppositions that make it difficult to effectively address the problems of subject-object interaction and discontinuity inherent to quantum gravity. The core objectivist assumption implicit in relativity theory and quantum mechanics is uncovered and we see that, in string theory, this assumption leads into contradiction. To address this challenge, a new philosophical foundation is proposed based on the phenomenology of Maurice Merleau-Ponty and Martin Heidegger. Then, through (...)
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  47.  29
    Gideon Rosen (1997). Who Makes the Rules Around Here? Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 57 (1):163 - 171.
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  48. Gideon Rosen (1998). Blackburn's Essays in Quasi-Realism (New York: Oxford University Press). Noûs 32 (3):386–405.
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  49. Gideon Rosen (2002). The Case for Incompatibilism. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 64 (3):699-706.
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  50.  58
    Mark Israelit & Nathan Rosen (1995). Cosmic Dark Matter and Dirac Gauge Function. Foundations of Physics 25 (5):763-777.
    It is suggested that the dark matter of the universe is due to the presence of a scalar field described by the gauge function introduced by Dirac in his modification of the Weyl geometry. The behavior of such dark matter is investigated.
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