Search results for 'Rosenberg, Mordecai' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Roshwald Mordecai (2008). Toleration, Pluralism, and Truth. Diogenes 55 (3):25-34.
  2. Robin O. Andreasen & Milo J. Aukerman (2002). The Human Genome Project: A Reply to Rosenberg. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 17 (5):673-678.
    In this paper we discuss the scientific value of the human genome project. To what extent is the data obtained by sequencing the entire human genome useful in the gene dicovery process? Responding to Alex Rosenberg' skepticism about the value of such data, we maintain that brute sequence data is much more useful than he suggests.
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  3.  2
    Roland Puccetti (1976). Reply to Martin and Rosenberg. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 6 (March):139-141.
    If martin and rosenberg were right, It ought to have been possible for higher animals to evolve neural mechanisms that evoke complex avoidance-Of-Tissue-Damage behavior "without" their experiencing pain. The alleged identity of mental event types like pain with unspecified brain state types thus can have no evolutionary explanation. It will not do to say that these brain state types may be discovered some day to have a distinguishing property x, Since x would still be a physical property and one could (...)
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  4.  29
    Mohan P. Matthen (1989). Intensionality and Perception: A Reply to Rosenberg. Journal of Philosophy 86 (December):727-733.
  5.  2
    Christian Helmut Wenzel (2006). Jay Rosenberg: Thinking About Knowing, OUP 2002. [REVIEW] European Journal of Philosophy 14 (3):453–456.
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  6. Georges Politzer (1947). Révolution Et Contre-Révolution au Xxe Siècle Réponse À "or Et Sang" de M. Rosenberg. Éditions Sociales.
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  7. Jennifer McKitrick (2006). Rosenberg on Causation. Psyche 12 (5).
    This paper is an explication and critique of a new theory of causation found in part II of Gregg Rosenberg's _A Place for Consciousness._ According to Rosenberg's Theory of Causal significance, causation constrains indeterminate possibilities, and according to his Carrier Theory, physical properties are dispositions which have phenomenal properties as their causal bases. This author finds Rosenberg's metaphysics excessively speculative, with disappointing implications for the place of consciousness in the natural world.
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  8.  83
    Bence Nanay (2012). Function Attribution Depends on the Explanatory Context: A Reply to Neander and Rosenberg's Reply to Nanay. Journal of Philosophy 109 (10):623-627.
    In ‘A modal theory of function’, I gave an argument against all existing theories of function and outlined a new theory. Karen Neander and Alex Rosenberg argue against both my negative and my positive claim. My aim here is not merely to defend my account from their objections, but to (a) very briefly point out that the new account of etiological function they propose in response to my criticism cannot avoid the circularity worry either and, more importantly, to (b) highlight, (...)
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  9. William E. Seager (2006). Rosenberg, Reducibility and Consciousness. Psyche 12.
    Rosenberg’s general argumentative strategy in favour of panpsychism is an extension of a traditional pattern. Although his argument is complex and intricate, I think a model that is historically significant and fundamentally similar to the position Rosenberg advances might help us understand the case for panpsychism. Thus I want to begin by considering a Leibnizian argument for panpsychism.
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  10.  33
    Marc Lange (2004). The Autonomy of Functional Biology: A Reply to Rosenberg. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 19 (1):93-109.
    Rosenberg has recently argued that explanations supplied by (what he calls) functional biology are mere promissory notes for macromolecular adaptive explanations. Rosenberg's arguments currently constitute one of the most substantial challenges to the autonomy, irreducibility, and indispensability of the explanations supplied by functional biology. My responses to Rosenberg's arguments will generate a novel account of the autonomy of functional biology. This account will turn on the relations between counterfactuals, scientific explanations, and natural laws. Crucially, in their treatment of the laws' (...)
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  11.  45
    Mehmet Elgin & Elliott Sober (2014). Causal, A Priori True, and Explanatory: A Reply to Lange and Rosenberg. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 93 (1):167-171.
    Sober [2011] argues that some causal statements are a priori true and that a priori causal truths are central to explanations in the theory of natural selection. Lange and Rosenberg [2011] criticize Sober's argument. They concede that there are a priori causal truths, but maintain that those truths are only ‘minimally causal’. They also argue that explanations that are built around a priori causal truths are not causal explanations, properly speaking. Here we criticize both of Lange and Rosenberg's claims.
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  12.  29
    Elliott Sober (1984). Fact, Fiction, and Fitness: A Reply to Rosenberg. Journal of Philosophy 81 (7):372-383.
    Alexander Rosenberg begins his recent article on the concept of fitness with the remark that "debates about the cognitive status of the Darwinian theory of natural selection should have ended long ago." I agree that this obsession needs to be overcome. But Rosenberg repeats some of the old mis- takes and invents epicycles on others. In this comment I will not be able to circumscribe fully the range of topics that an adequate treatment of this cluster of problems demands. A (...)
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  13.  45
    Alex Voorhoeve (2001). Review of Alex Rosenberg's Philosophy of Science: A Contemporary Introduction. Routledge, London, 2000. Pp. 191. For Philosophy Today, 2001. [REVIEW] Philosophy Today 14:8-9.
    Philosophy of Science is a mid-level text for students with some grounding in philosophy. It introduces the questions that drive enquiry in the philosophy of science, and aims to educate readers in the main positions, problems and arguments in the field today. Alex Rosenberg is certainly well qualified to write such an introduction. His works cover a large area of the philosophy of natural and social sciences. In addition, the author of the argument that the ‘queen of the social sciences’, (...)
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  14.  26
    Douglas W. Hands (1984). What Economics is Not: An Economist's Response to Rosenberg. Philosophy of Science 51 (3):495-503.
    Alexander Rosenberg (1983) has argued, contrary to his previous work in the philosophy of economics, that economics is not science, and it is merely mathematics. The following paper argues that Rosenberg fails to demonstrate either of these two claims. The questions of the predictive weakness of modern economics and the cognitive standing of abstract economic theory are discussed in detail.
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  15.  42
    Alexander Rosenberg (1986). What Rosenberg's Philosophy of Economics is Not. Philosophy of Science 53 (1):127-132.
  16. Tom Roberts (2009). Guidance, Selection, and Representation: Response to Anderson and Rosenberg. Journal of Mind and Behavior 30 (4):291-299.
    Anderson and Rosenberg’s guidance theory of representation offers an analysis of mental content that strongly emphasises the influence that intentional states have upon the production and modulation of bodily behavior. On this view, a mental state gains both its status as a representation, and its content, in virtue of occupying a particular role in the guidance of action. I present three related challenges for the guidance theory, before defending an alternative model that is grounded not in action-guidance, but in action-selection. (...)
     
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  17.  6
    E. Roy Weintraub (1987). Rosenberg's “Lakatosian Consolations for Economists”: Comment. Economics and Philosophy 3 (1):139.
    Rosenberg argues that economists have embraced the methodology of scientific research programs, and the writings of Imre Lakatos, at the same time that philosophers have been abandoning that approach. According to Rosenberg, the methodology of scientific research programs appears to allow some work in economics, which is neither tested nor testable, to be “scientific” nonetheless. That is, MSRP justifies some current practices which look hard to justify on strict falsificationist, or dogmatic positivist, grounds.
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  18.  19
    Willem deVries (2010). Kant, Rosenberg, and the Mirror of Philosophy. In James O'Shea & Eric Rubenstein (eds.), Self, Language, and World: Problems from Kant, Sellars, and Rosenberg. Ridgeview
  19.  25
    David L. Hull (1992). An Evolutionary Account of Science: A Response to Rosenberg's Critical Notice. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 7 (2):229-236.
    In his critical notice, Rosenberg (1991) raises three objections to my evolutionary account of science: whether it is more than a week metaphor, the compatibility of my past objections to reduction and my current advocacy of viewing selection in terms of replication and interaction, and finally, the feasibility of identifying appropriate replicators and interactors in biological evolution, let alone conceptual evolution. I discuss each of these objections in turn.
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  20.  3
    Aleksandar Molnar (2006). Alfred Rosenberg’s Clash with Christianity. Filozofija I Društvo 29:9-35.
    In the article the author is following the development of Alfred Rosenberg’s social and political theory. Special attention is given to the anti-Christian attitude of the so-called "chief ideologist of Third Reich". Although one among the creators of the apocalyptic anti-Semitist ideology he opposed Nazi "Eastern politics" during the World War II. Instead of atrocities against the eastern peoples he was prepared to give them certain autonomy and to treat them as some kind of racially inferior allies. For him, only (...)
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  21.  6
    Martin J. Earl (2011). REVIEW: Charles E. Rosenberg. Our Present Complaint: American Medicine, Then and Now. [REVIEW] Spontaneous Generations 5 (1):83-84.
    Charles Rosenberg’s latest book is a collection of ten essays spanning twelve years’ work on the history of American medicine, and seeks to provide both the historian and the practicing physician with an understanding of the framework that lies beneath our modern medical system. He states his cause explicitly in the opening chapter: “Insofar as I have a personal agenda, it is a desire to underline the need...for physicians to think and act on an understanding of [their] unique social and (...)
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  22.  7
    Alexander Rosenberg (1982). Book Review:Sociobiology and the Preemption of Social Science Alexander Rosenberg. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 49 (4):648-.
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  23.  5
    J. Dupre (1995). Review of Rosenberg's "Instrumental Biology or the Disunity of Science". [REVIEW] Philosophical Explorations.
    This book is the apologia of a frustrated reductionist. The frustration derives from Rosenberg's clear perception that the project of physicalist reduction, the reduction of all the sciences of complex objects to physics, is impossible, at least, as he often says, for beings hampered by our limited cognitive and computational abilities. The reductionism that survives this realisation is purely metaphysical. It is the firm commitment to the view that ultimately whatever happens happens because of the universally lawlike behavior of the (...)
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  24. Dore Ashton (1980). On Harold Rosenberg. Critical Inquiry 6 (4):615-624.
    Rosenberg was a chronicler and a good one, yet much of his inner dialogue was not with the present so much as the omnipresent artistic past. The central question, posed early in his life, concerned a man's individuality. Dostoyevsky had called it his "dearest" possession. At no time, even in his Marxist youth, did Rosenberg relinquish his vision of the individual as the central, most important player in any drama. Rosenberg was positively possessed with Dostoyevsky's doubts. One can hear the (...)
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  25. Alexander Rosenberg (1988). ERRATUM TO ROSENBERG Vol. 14, No. 2, P. 127 Bottom: Intentional Psychology and Evolutionary Biology: Part II: The Crucial Disanalogy. [REVIEW] Behaviorism 16 (1):97-97.
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  26. Jay F. Rosenberg (1984). The Practice of Philosophy a Handbook for Beginners /Jay F. Rosenberg. --. --. Prentice-Hall,1984.
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  27. William Robinson, “Doubts About Receptivity”, Commentary on G. Rosenberg's a Place for Consciousness (Oxford U. P., 2004).
     
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  28.  95
    Mohan Matthen & Andre Ariew (2005). How to Understand Casual Relations in Natural Selection: Reply to Rosenberg and Bouchard. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 20 (2-3):355-364.
    In “Two Ways of Thinking About Fitness and Natural Selection” (Matthen and Ariew [2002]; henceforth “Two Ways”), we asked how one should think of the relationship between the various factors invoked to explain evolutionary change – selection, drift, genetic constraints, and so on. We suggested that these factors are not related to one another as “forces” are in classical mechanics. We think it incoherent, for instance, to think of natural selection and drift as separate and opposed “forces” in evolutionary change (...)
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  29. James R. O'Shea & Eric Rubenstein (eds.) (2010). Self, Language, and World: Problems From Kant, Sellars, and Rosenberg. Ridgeview Publishing Co..
  30.  56
    M. A. G. Cutter (1987). Henrik R. Wulff, Stig Andur Pedersen and Raben Rosenberg: 1986, Philosophy of Medicine: An Introduction, Blackwell Scientific Publications, Oxford, 222 Pp. [REVIEW] Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 12 (4):413-415.
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  31.  47
    Manfred D. Laubichler & Günter P. Wagner (2001). How Molecular is Molecular Developmental Biology? A Reply to Alex Rosenberg's Reductionism Redux: Computing the Embryo. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 16 (1):53-68.
    This paper argues in defense of theanti-reductionist consensus in the philosophy ofbiology. More specifically, it takes issues with AlexRosenberg's recent challenge of this position. Weargue that the results of modern developmentalgenetics rather than eliminating the need forfunctional kinds in explanations of developmentactually reinforce their importance.
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  32. Massimo Pigliucci (2012). The Atheist's Guide to Reality: Enjoying Life Without Illusions, by Alex Rosenberg (WW Norton & Co) $25.95/£ 17.99. The Philosophers' Magazine 57:111-112.
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  33.  5
    James B. South (2003). 'My God, It's Like a Greek Tragedy': Willow Rosenberg and Human Irrationality. In James South (ed.), Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Philosophy: Fear and Trembling in Sunnydale. Open Court 3--131.
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  34.  8
    Marten Ten Hoor (1946). Rosenberg's Nazi Myth. [REVIEW] Journal of Philosophy 43 (19):530-531.
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  35.  17
    Emanuel S. Goldsmith (1993). Salvational Zionism and Religious Naturalism in the Thought of Mordecai M. Kaplan. Process Studies 22 (4):204-210.
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  36.  9
    Bernard Berofsky (1983). Hume and the Problem of Causation by Tom L. Beauchamp and Alexander Rosenberg. Journal of Philosophy 80 (8):478-492.
  37.  3
    Elliott Sober (1986). Comments on Rosenberg's Review. Behaviorism 14 (1):89-96.
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  38.  36
    Stavros Ioannidis (2012). Book Notice of Rosenberg & Arp (Eds) Philosophy of Biology: An Anthology. [REVIEW] Metascience 21 (1):249-250.
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  39.  8
    Alison Wylie (1986). REVIEW: One World and Our Knowledge of It by J. F. Rosenberg. International Studies in Philosophy 18 (3):83-85.
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  40.  9
    William E. Kaufman (1991). Mordecai M. Kaplan and Process Theology. Process Studies 20 (4):192-199.
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  41. Douglas N. Walton (1985). Jay F. Rosenberg, Thinking Clearly About Death Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 5 (4):176-178.
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  42.  10
    Slobodan Perović (2008). Why Rosenberg and Kaplan's Attempt to Reconcile Physicalism and Antireductionism Concerning Biology is Unsatisfactory. Theoria 51 (1):7-18.
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  43.  18
    H. H. Scullard (1950). Cato Maior V. Marmorale: Cato Maior. Pp. 267. Bari: Laterza, 1949. Paper, L. 1,600. Francesco Della Corte: Catone Censore, la Vita e la Fortuna. Pp. 190. Turin: Rosenberg & Sellier, 1949. Paper, L. 1,600. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 64 (3-4):132-134.
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  44.  4
    R. S. Conway (1914). The City State in Ancient Italy The City State in Ancient Italy (Der Staat der Alten Italiker). By Dr Arthur Rosenberg. Berlin : Weidmannsche Buchhandlung. 1913. M. 4. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 28 (08):274-276.
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  45.  4
    H. -J. Schoeps (1972). Hans Rosenberg: Politische Denkströmungen im deutschen Vormärz, Verlag Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht Göttingen 1972, 142 pp. [REVIEW] Zeitschrift für Religions- Und Geistesgeschichte 24 (4):378-378.
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  46.  4
    W. Wayte (1891). Westermann's Demosthenes Ausgewählte Reden des Demosthenes, erklärt Westermann von Anton. Drittes Bändchen: Aristokrates, Konon, Eubulides. Dritte verbesserte Auflage, besorgt von Dr. Emil Rosenberg. Berlin: Weidmannsche Buchhandlung. 1890. 1 Mk. 80. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 5 (1-2):24-25.
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  47.  5
    Robert N. Brandon (1987). The Structure of Biological Science by Alexander Rosenberg. Journal of Philosophy 84 (4):224-227.
  48.  24
    C. Kenneth Waters (1990). Rosenberg's Rebellion. Biology and Philosophy 5 (2):225-239.
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  49.  5
    Martin Hollis (1982). Forms of Explanation by Alan Garfinkel and Sociobiology and the Preemption of Social Science by Alexander Rosenberg. Journal of Philosophy 79 (5):283-286.
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  50.  14
    Elliott Sober & Richard C. Lewontin (1983). Reply to Rosenberg on Genic Selectionism. Philosophy of Science 50 (4):648-650.
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