Search results for 'Roshan H. Johnsen' (try it on Scholar)

  1. Kishor Atreya, Bishal Sitaula, Fred Johnsen & Roshan Bajracharya (2011). Continuing Issues in the Limitations of Pesticide Use in Developing Countries. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 24 (1):49-62.score: 120.0
    The rationale for pesticide use in agriculture is that costs associated with pesticide pollution are to be justified by its benefits, but this is not so obvious. Valuing the benefits by simple economic analysis has increased pesticide use in agriculture and consequently produced pesticide-induced “public ills.” This paper attempts to explore the research gaps of the economic and social consequences of pesticide use in developing countries, particularly with an example of Nepal. We argue that although the negative sides of agricultural (...)
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  2. Bishal Kishor Atreya, Fred K. Sitaula, Roshan H. Johnsen & M. Bajracharya (forthcoming). Continuing Issues in the Limitations of Pesticide Use in Developing Countries. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics.score: 29.0
    The rationale for pesticide use in agriculture is that costs associated with pesticide pollution are to be justified by its benefits, but this is not so obvious. Valuing the benefits by simple economic analysis has increased pesticide use in agriculture and consequently produced pesticide-induced “public ills.” This paper attempts to explore the research gaps of the economic and social consequences of pesticide use in developing countries, particularly with an example of Nepal. We argue that although the negative sides of agricultural (...)
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  3. Knut Borch-Johnsen, Jørgen H. Olsen & Thorkild I. A. Sørensen (1994). Genes and Family Environment in Familial Clustering of Cancer. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 15 (4).score: 12.0
    Familial clustering of a disease is defined as the occurrence of the disease within some families in excess of what would be expected from the occurrence in the population. It has been demonstrated for several cancer types, ranging from rare cancers as the adenomatosis-coli-associated colon cancer or the Li-Fraumeni syndrome to more common cancers as breast cancer and colon cancer. Familial clustering, however, is merely an epidemiological pattern, and it does not tell whether genetic or environmental causes or both in (...)
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