1. Roslyn Holly Fitch & Victor H. Denenberg (1998). A Role for Ovarian Hormones in Sexual Differentiation of the Brain. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (3):311-327.
    Historically, studies of the role of endogenous hormones in developmental differentiation of the sexes have suggested that mammalian sexual differentiation is mediated primarily by testicular androgens, and that exposure to androgens in early life leads to a male brain as defined by neuroanatomy and behavior. The female brain has been assumed to develop via a hormonal default mechanism, in the absence of androgen or other hormones. Ovarian hormones have significant effects on the development of a sexually dimorphic cortical structure, the (...)
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  2. Roslyn Holly Fitch & Victor H. Denenberg (1998). Default is Not in the Female, but in the Theory. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (3):341-346.
    A number of commentators agree that the evidence reviewed in the target article supports a previously unrecognized role for ovarian hormones in feminization of the brain. Others question this view, suggesting that the traditional model of sexual differentiation already accounts for ovarian influence. This position is supported by various reinterpretations of the data presented (e.g., ovarian effects are secondary to the presence/absence of androgen, ovarian effects are smaller than testicular effects, ovarian effects are not organizational). We discuss these issues, and (...)
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  3. Roslyn Holly Fitch & Paula Tallal (1995). A Case for Auditory Temporal Processing as an Evolutionary Precursor to Speech Processing and Language Function. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (1):189.
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