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Ross Buck [9]Ross W. Buck [1]
  1. Ross Buck (2014). Emotional Attachment Security as the Origin of Liberal-Conservative Differences in Vigilance to Negative Features of the Environment. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 37 (3):308-309.
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  2. Ross Buck (2014). Extending the Global Village: Emotional Communication in the Online Age. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 37 (1):79-80.
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  3. Ross W. Buck (2012). Prime Elements of Subjectively Experienced Feelings and Desires: Imaging the Emotional Cocktail. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (3):144-144.
    Primary affects exist at an ecological-communicative level of analysis, and therefore are not identifiable with specific brain regions. The constructionist view favored in the target article, that emotions emerge from does not specify the nature of these processes. These more basic processes may actually involve specific neurochemical systems, that is, primary motivational-emotional systems (primes), associated with specific feelings and desires that combine to form the of experienced emotion.
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  4. Ross Buck (2010). Emotion is an Entity at Both Biological and Ecological Levels: The Ghost in the Machine is Language. Emotion Review 2 (3):286-287.
    In “Emergent Ghosts of the Emotion Machine,” James Coan neglects emotion displays involved in social communication and activity in central neurochemical systems associated with drug-induced changes in feelings and desires. Also, he fails to recognize that emotions are not rigidly bound to action tendencies, but rather have evolved internal signals to afford flexibility of response. Emotion indices naturally lack close coordination because different aspects—physiological arousal, expressive display, subjective experience—are differentially accessible to the responder and interaction partner, and therefore undergo different (...)
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  5. Ross Buck (2005). Adding Ingredients to the Self-Organizing Dynamic System Stew: Motivation, Communication, and Higher-Level Emotions – and Don't Forget the Genes! Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (2):197-198.
    Self-organizing dynamic systems (DS) modeling is appropriate to conceptualizing the relationship between emotion and cognition-appraisal. Indeed, DS modeling can be applied to encompass and integrate additional phenomena at levels lower than emotional interpretations (genes), at the same level (motives), and at higher levels (social, cognitive, and moral emotions). Also, communication is a phenomenon involved in dynamic system interactions at all levels.
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  6. Ross Buck (2002). “Choice” and “Emotion” in Altruism: Reflections on the Morality of Justice Versus the Morality of Caring. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (2):254-255.
    Rachlin uses the word “choice” 80 times, whereas “emotion” does not appear. In contrast, “Empathy: Its ultimate and proximate bases” by Preston and de Waal, uses the word “emotion” 139 times and “choice” once. This commentary compares these ways of approaching empathy and altruism, relating Rachlin's approach to Gilligan's Morality of Justice and Preston and de Waal's to the Morality of Caring.
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  7. Ross Buck (2000). Conceptualizing Motivation and Emotion. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (2):195-196.
    Motivation and emotion are not clearly defined and differentiated in Rolls's The brain and emotion, reflecting a widespread problem in conceptualizing these phenomena. An adequate theory of emotion cannot be based upon reward and punishment alone. Basic mechanisms of arousal, agonistic, and prosocial motives-emotions exist in addition to reward-punishment systems.
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  8. Ross Buck (1986). 17 A Psychological View of the Neurobiology of Emotion. In David A. Oakley (ed.), Mind and Brain. Methuen. 361.
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  9. Ross Buck (1986). A Psychologist's Reply Ross Buck LeDoux and I Clearly Agree That Psychologists Studying Emotion Must Be Aware of the Work of Neuroscientists to Provide a Framework for Their Ideas, and That Psychological Theory and Research May Provide Leads for Neuroscientists. In David A. Oakley (ed.), Mind and Brain. Methuen. 359.
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  10. Ross Buck (1986). The Psychology of Emotion. In David A. Oakley (ed.), Mind and Brain. Methuen. 275.
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