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  1. Hyman Gross & Ross Harrison, Causation Outside the Law.
    In their important book, Causation in the Law, H. L. A. Hart and Tony Honore argue that causation in the law is based on causation outside the law, that the causal principles the courts rely on to determine legal responsibility are based on distinctions exercised in ordinary causal judgments. A distinction that particularly concerns them is one that divides factors that are necessary or sine qua non for an effect into those that count as causes for purposes of legal responsibility (...)
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  2. Ross Harrison (2012). The Equal Extent of Natural and Civil Law. In David Dyzenhaus & Thomas Poole (eds.), Hobbes and the Law. Cambridge University Press.
  3. Michael D. A. Freeman & Ross Harrison (eds.) (2007). Law and Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    Current Legal Issues, like its sister volume Current Legal Problems, is based upon an annual colloquium held at University College London. Each year, leading scholars from around the world gather to discuss the relationship between law and another discipline of thought. Each colloqium examines how the external discipline is conceived in legal thought and argument, how the law is pictured in that discipline, and analyses points of controversy in the use, and abuse, of extra-legal arguments within legal theory and practice. (...)
     
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  4. Ross Harrison (2007). The Moral is : States Make Laws. In Michael D. A. Freeman & Ross Harrison (eds.), Law and Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
     
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  5. Ross Harrison (2003). Hobbes, Locke, and Confusion's Masterpiece: An Examination of Seventeenth-Century Political Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    In this major study of the foundations of modern political theory the eminent political philosopher T. R. Harrison explains, analyzes, and criticizes the work of Hobbes, Locke, and their contemporaries. He provides a full account of the turbulent historical background that shaped the political, intellectual, and religious content of this philosophy. The book explores such questions as the limits of political authority and the relation of the legitimacy of government to the will of its people in non-technical, accessible prose that (...)
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  6. Ross Harrison (2003). Nineteenth-Century British Philosophers. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 11 (4):715 – 726.
  7. Ross Harrison (2003). Oren Ben-Dor, Constitutional Limits and the Public Sphere: A Critical Study of Bentham's Constitutionalism, Oxford/Portland, Hart Publishing, 2000, Pp. Xiv + 336. Utilitas 15 (02):255-.
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  8. Ross Harrison (ed.) (2001). Henry Sidgwick. British Academy.
    These essays constitute a welcome addition to the current re-engagement with the ethical thought of a prominent late Victorian philosopher and reformer. Henry Sidgwick wrote the first professional work of modern moral philosophy, yet one century after his death his thought remains relevant to the present revival of interest in the question of how we should live. -/- How does moral philosophy fit in with the more general use of practical reason? - a still puzzling and deeply contested problem. Which (...)
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  9. Ross Harrison (2000). Government is Good for You. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 100 (2):159–173.
    There is an argument that government cannot be good for individuals because it causes them to act through fear of punishment, hence for nonmoral reasons. The obvious responses of accepting the conclusion (anarchism) and denying the premiss about moral motivation (utilitarianism) are first considered. Then the strategy of accepting the premiss but denying the conclusion is pursued at greater length. Some arguments of T. H. Green and B. Bosanquet which attempt to do this are considered before an independent resolution is (...)
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  10. Ross Harrison (1998). Rosen's Sacrifice of Utility. Utilitas 10 (02):159-.
    The note claims that Rosen's arguments about distribution and aggregation do not support his central claim, either in their own terms or as a reading of Bentham; and suggests a different account of the relation of the objective to the subjective in Bentham.
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  11. Ross Harrison (1996). Philosophy After Objectivity: Making Sense in Perspective. Philosophical Books 37 (3):190-192.
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  12. Ross Harrison (1996). Cambridge Philosophers VI: Henry Sidgwick. Philosophy 71 (277):423 - 438.
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  13. Ross Harrison & Jeremy Waldron (1996). Liberal Rights. Philosophical Quarterly 46 (184):401.
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  14. Hugh Upton & Ross Harrison (1996). Democracy. Philosophical Quarterly 46 (183):271.
    Democracy surrounds us like the air we breath, and is normally taken very much for granted. Across the world democracy has become accepted as an unquestionably good thing. Yet upon further examination the merits of democracy are both paradoxical and problematic, and the treasured values of liberty and equality can be used to argue both for and against it. In the historical section of the book, Ross Harrison clearly traces the history of democracy by examining the works of, amongst others, (...)
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  15. J. E. J. Altham & Ross Harrison (eds.) (1995). World, Mind, and Ethics: Essays on the Ethical Philosophy of Bernard Williams. Cambridge University Press.
    Bernard Williams is one of the most influential figures in recent ethical theory, where he has set a considerable part of the current agenda. In this collection, a distinguished international team of philosophers who have been stimulated by Williams' work give new responses to it. The topics covered include equality, consistency, comparisons between science and ethics, integrity, moral reasons, the moral system, and moral knowledge. Williams himself then provides a substantial reply, which in turn shows both the current directions of (...)
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  16. Ross Harrison & Adam Morton (1993). Disasters and Dilemmas. Philosophical Quarterly 43 (171):270.
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  17. Hyman Gross & Ross Harrison (eds.) (1992). Jurisprudence: Cambridge Essays. Oxford University Press.
    Each of the essays included in this volume illuminates an aspect of law, reflecting an unorthodox perception of jurisprudence which combines interests in philosophy, legal theory, criminology, legal history, political and constitutional theory and the history of ideas. This work will broaden the jurisprudential scope of practitioners' professional concerns, but help academics enhance their knowledge of the wealth of information for their own studies.
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  18. Ross Harrison (1992). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] Mind 101 (403):571-573.
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  19. Ross Harrison (1992). The Equality of Mercy. In Hyman Gross & Ross Harrison (eds.), Jurisprudence: Cambridge Essays. Oxford University Press. 107--25.
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  20. Ross Harrison (1992). Geoffrey Scarre, Logic and Reality in the Philosophy of John Stuart Mill, Dordrecht, Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1989, Pp. Vi + 242.John Skorupski, John Stuart Mill, London, Routledge, 1989, Pp. Xvi + 432. [REVIEW] Utilitas 4 (01):157-.
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  21. Ross Harrison (1991). Natural Reasons: Personality and Polity. Philosophical Books 32 (4):229-231.
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  22. Ross Harrison (1990). State Punishment By Nicola Lacey London: Routledge, 1988, Xiii + 222 Pp., £25.00. [REVIEW] Philosophy 65 (252):239-.
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  23. Ross Harrison (1989). The Mind of God and the Works of Man. Philosophical Books 30 (1):27-29.
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  24. Ross Harrison & R. A. Duff (1988). Punishment and Crime. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 62:139 - 167.
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  25. Ross Harrison (1983/1999). Bentham. Routledge.
    This book is available either individually, or as part of the specially-priced Arguments of the Philosphers Collection.
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  26. Ross Harrison (1982). Transcendental Arguments and Idealism. Royal Institute of Philosophy Lectures 13:211-224.
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  27. Ross Harrison (1981). Discounting the Future. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 82:45 - 57.
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  28. Ross Harrison (ed.) (1979). Rational Action: Studies in Philosophy and Social Science. Cambridge University Press.
    This volume is concerned with the concept of rationality and the interrelations between rationality, belief and desire in the explanation and evaluation of ...
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  29. Ross Harrison & Neil Cooper (1976). The Only Possible Morality. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 50:21 - 67.
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  30. Ross Harrison (1975). The Concept of Prepredicative Experience. In Edo Pivcevic (ed.), Phenomenology and Philosophical Understanding. London: Cambridge University Press. 95.
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  31. Ross Harrison (1974). On What There Must Be. Clarendon Press.
    This book addresses the importance of space and time, of existence unperceived, of publicity and action, and of natural laws. These are examined in a single argument which extends from Chapter Three to Chapter Seven and in the course of which the essential features of any comprehensible world are either assumed or derived. In Chapter Two, before this argument begins, the book introduces and argues for the methods by which this general argument is developed. In Chapter One, the book attempts (...)
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  32. Ross Harrison (1973). Lost Times. Analysis 33 (3):65 - 71.
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  33. Ross Harrison (1973). Reason and Reality: The Royal Institute of Philosophy Lectures, Volume 5, 1970–1971 Edited by Godfrey Vesey London, Macmillan, 1972, 243 Pp., £3.95. [REVIEW] Philosophy 48 (185):303-.
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  34. Ross Harrison (1970). Strawson on Outer Objects. Philosophical Quarterly 20 (July):213-221.