Search results for 'Ross King' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Peter King, The Cambridge Companion to Duns Scotus.score: 300.0
    [1] In twelve quite demanding chapters, outstanding scholars provide an overall view of the key issues of Scotus’s philosophical thought. To this a very concise introduction is added, concerning the life and works of John Duns (very good, especially the survey of works and the information on critical editions etc.). Throughout the book, I find the information clear and the difficult topics well explained. Moreover, the volume gives a quick entrance to the vast literature. Among the topics discussed are: ‘Metaphysics’ (...)
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  2. Ross King, Whelan D., E. Kenneth, Ffion Jones, Reiser M., G. K. Philip, Christopher Bryant, Muggleton H., H. Stephen, Douglas Kell, Oliver B. & G. Stephen (2004). Functional Genomic Hypothesis Generation and Experimentation by a Robot Scientist. Nature 427 (6971):247--52.score: 240.0
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  3. A. A. Akom, Ojeya Cruz Banks, Eric A. Hurley, Karen A. Johnson, Judith King-Calnek, Daniel Perlstein & Sabrina Ross (2009). Education as Freedom: African American Educational Thought and Activism. Lexington Books.score: 240.0
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  4. Sallie B. King & Paul O. Ingram (2005). The Frederick J. Streng Book Award: An Interview with Paul Ingram and Sallie King. Buddhist-Christian Studies 24 (1):313-316.score: 180.0
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  5. Douglas Mesner & Colin A. Ross (2011). Letter to the Editor: A Dialogue Regarding Colin Ross' Article “The Electrophysiological Basis of Evil Eye Belief”. Anthropology of Consciousness 22 (2):103-105.score: 180.0
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  6. R. B. King & D. H. Rouvray (2006). Response of D. H. Rouvray and R. B. King, Editors of the Book “the Periodic Table: Into the 21st Century”. [REVIEW] Foundations of Chemistry 8 (3):305-306.score: 180.0
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  7. Braxton Ross (1991). Bernhard Bischoff, Latin Palaeography: Antiquity and the Middle Ages. Trans. Dáibhí Ò Cróinín and David Ganz. Cambridge, Eng.: Cambridge University Press, in Association with the Medieval Academy of Ireland, 1990. Pp. Xi, 291; Black-and-White Plates, Figures. $59.50 (Cloth); $22.95 (Paper). First Published as Paläographie des Römischen Altertums Und des Abendländischen Mittelalters in 1979 by Erich Schmidt and Reviewed in Speculum 57 (1982), 118–21, by B. Ross. [REVIEW] Speculum 66 (1):121-122.score: 180.0
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  8. Don Ross (2007). Game Theory as Mathematics for Biology: Evolutionary Dynamics and Extensive Form Games Ross Cressman Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2003 (330 Pp; $48.00 Hbk; ISBN 0262033054); Moral Sentiments and Material Interests Herbert Gintis , Samuel Bowles , Robert Boyd and Ernst Fehr , Eds Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2005 (416 Pp; $50.00 Hbk; ISBN 0262072521). [REVIEW] Biological Theory 2 (1):104-107.score: 180.0
  9. John Mitchell & James B. Ross (1968). An Interview with James B. Ross. Bioscience 18 (8):779-781.score: 180.0
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  10. Anton-Hermann Chroust (1973). Who Is Al-Kindi's "Greek King" (Frag. 11, Ross) of Aristotle's "Eudemis"? The Modern Schoolman 50 (4):379-381.score: 120.0
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  11. A. P. Bos (1988). Is the "Greek King" in Eudemus Fr. 11 (Ross) Endymion of Elis? The Modern Schoolman 65 (2):79-96.score: 120.0
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  12. Lily Ross Taylor (1928). The Daimon of the Persian King. Journal of Hellenic Studies 48:6.score: 36.0
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  13. Keqian Xu (2008). The Abdication of King Kuai of Yan and the Issue of Political Legitimacy in the Warring States Period. Journal of School of Chinese Language and Culture 2008 (3).score: 24.0
    The event that King Kuai of Yan demised the crown to his premier Zizhi, is a tentative way of political power transmission happened in the social transforming Warring States Period, which was influenced by the popular theory of Yao and Shun’s demise of that time. However, this tentative was obviously a failure, coming under attacks from all Confucian, Taoist and Legalist scholars. We may understand the development of the thinking concerning the issue of political legitimacy during the Warring States (...)
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  14. Anthony Skelton (2013). Ross, William David. In James Crimmins (ed.), Bloomsbury Encyclopedia of Utilitarianism. Bloomsbury Academic.score: 24.0
    A short encyclopedia article devoted to W. D. Ross.
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  15. Charles Sayward (1988). W.D. Ross on Acting From Motives. Journal of Value Inquiry 22 (4):299-306.score: 24.0
    This paper defends a position held by W, D, Ross that it is no part of one’s duty to have a certain motive since one cannot by choice have it here and now.
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  16. Brian Weatherson (2013). Ross on Sleeping Beauty. Philosophical Studies 163 (2):503-512.score: 24.0
    In two excellent recent papers, Jacob Ross has argued that the standard arguments for the ‘thirder’ answer to the Sleeping Beauty puzzle lead to violations of countable additivity. The problem is that most arguments for that answer generalise in awkward ways when he looks at the whole class of what he calls Sleeping Beauty problems. In this note I develop a new argument for the thirder answer that doesn't generalise in this way.
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  17. Ian Gerrie (2006). Knowledge on the Horizon: A Phenomenological Inquiry Into the “Framing” of Rodney King. [REVIEW] Human Studies 29 (3):295 - 315.score: 24.0
    Using the 1991 police beating of Rodney King as case study, this paper draws on Husserlian phenomenology to establish a coherentist account of knowledge as situated with respect to its concrete circumstances of production (e.g., social, cultural, historical, political). I take as my point of departure Gail Weiss's phenomenological investigation into the jury's assessment of evidence in the "Rodney King incident," and in particular, her interest in Husserl's conception of the "horizon" as a structure of consciousness that mediates (...)
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  18. Krzysztof Brzechczyn (2004). The Concept of Nonviolence in the Political Theology of Martin Luther King. In Roman Kozłowski Karolina M. Cern (ed.), Prawo, władza, suwerenność [Law, Power, Sovereignty]. Adam Mickiewicz University Press.score: 24.0
    This article presents the political theology of Martin Luther King. I analyze the notion of political theology, King's argumentation in favour of non-violence strategy in politics and reconstruct a standard model of non-violence action. Finally, I discuss some philosophical and political controversies arising around passive resistance.
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  19. Marilyn Bailey Ogilvie (2007). Inbreeding, Eugenics, and Helen Dean King (1869-1955). Journal of the History of Biology 40 (3):467 - 507.score: 24.0
    Helen Dean King's scientific work focused on inbreeding using experimental data collected from standardized laboratory rats to elucidate problems in human heredity. The meticulous care with which she carried on her inbreeding experiments assured that her results were dependable and her theoretical explanations credible. By using her nearly homozygous rats as desired commodities, she also was granted access to venues and people otherwise unavailable to her as a woman. King's scientific career was made possible through her life experiences. (...)
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  20. Nancy G. Slack (2003). Are Research Schools Necessary? Contrasting Models of 20th Century Research at Yale Led by Ross Granville Harrison, Grace E. Pickford and G. Evelyn Hutchinson. Journal of the History of Biology 36 (3):501 - 529.score: 24.0
    This paper compares and contrasts three groups that conducted biological research at Yale University during overlapping periods between 1910 and 1970. Yale University proved important as a site for this research. The leaders of these groups were Ross Granville Harrison, Grace E. Pickford, and G. Evelyn Hutchinson, and their members included both graduate students and more experienced scientists. All produced innovative research, including the opening of new subfields in embryology, endocrinology and ecology respectively, over a long period of time. (...)
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  21. John Ladd (1973). Ethical Relativism. Belmont, Calif.,Wadsworth Pub. Co..score: 24.0
    Herodotus. Custom is king.--Engels, F. Ethics and law: eternal truths.--Sumner, W. G. Folkways.--Ross, W. D. The meaning of right.--Duncker, K. Ethical relativity?--Herskovits, M. J. Cultural relativism and cultural values.--Kluckhohn, C. Ethical relativity: sic et non.--Taylor, P. W. Social science and ethical relativism.--Ladd, J. The issue of relativism.--Redfield, R. The universally human and the culturally variable.--Bibliography (p. 145-146).
     
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  22. Russ Shafer-Landau (ed.) (2010). The Ethical Life: Fundamental Readings in Ethics and Moral Problems. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    Introduction -- Value theory : the nature of the good life -- Epicurus letter to Menoeceus -- John Stuart Mill, Hedonism -- Aldous Huxley, Brave new world -- Robert Nozick, The experience machine -- Richard Taylor, The meaning of life -- Jean Kazez, Necessities -- Normative ethics : theories of right conduct -- J.J.C. Smart, Eextreme and restricted utilitarianism -- Immanuel Kant the good will & the categorical imperative -- Thomas Hobbes, Leviathan -- Philippa Foot, Natural goodness -- Aristotle, Nicomachean (...)
     
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  23. Cian Dorr (2010). Review of James Ladyman and Don Ross, Every Thing Must Go: Metaphysics Naturalized. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (6).score: 18.0
    Ladyman, Ross and their collaborators (Spurrett is a co-author of two chapters, Collier of one) begin their book with a ferocious attack on "analytic metaphysics", as it is currently practiced. Their opening blast claims that contemporary analytic metaphysics 'contributes nothing to human knowledge': its practitioners are 'wasting their talents', and the whole enterprise, although 'engaged in by some extremely intelligent and morally serious people, fails to qualify as part of the enlightened pursuit of objective truth, and should be discontinued' (...)
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  24. Thomas L. Carson (2005). Ross and Utilitarianism on Promise Keeping and Lying: Self‐Evidence and the Data of Ethics. Philosophical Issues 15 (1):140–157.score: 18.0
    An important test of any moral theory is whether it can give a satisfactory account of moral prohibitions such as those against promise breaking and lying. Act-utilitarianism (hereafter utilitarianism) implies that any act can be justified if it results in the best consequences. Utilitarianism implies that it is sometimes morally right to break promises and tell lies. Few people find this result to be counterintuitive and very few are persuaded by Kant’s arguments that attempt to show that lying is always (...)
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  25. Thomas Hurka, On Audi's Marriage of Ross and Kant.score: 18.0
    As its title suggests, Robert Audi’s The Good in the Right1 defends an intuitionist moral view like W.D. Ross’s in The Right and the Good. Ross was an intuitionist, first, in metaethics, where he held that there are self-evident moral truths that can be known by intuition. But he was also an intuitionist in the different sense used in normative ethics, since he held that there are irreducibly many such truths. Some concern the intrinsic goods, which are in (...)
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  26. Kit Fine (2006). Arguing for Non-Identity: A Response to King and Frances. Mind 115 (460):1059-1082.score: 18.0
    I defend my paper ‘The Non-identity of a Material Thing and Its Matter’ against objections from Bryan Frances and Jeffrey King.
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  27. David Wiggins (1998). The Right and the Good and WD Ross's Criticism of Consequentialism. Utilitas 10 (3):261-.score: 18.0
    David Ross made the first sustained attack on Moore's agathistic utilitarianism or ethical neutralism a damaging concession to consequentialism.
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  28. Edward Feser (2013). Kripke, Ross, and the Immaterial Aspects of Thought. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 87 (1):1-32.score: 18.0
    James Ross developed a simple and powerful argument for the immateriality of the intellect, an argument rooted in the Aristotelian-Scholastic tradition while drawing on ideas from analytic philosophers Saul Kripke, W. V. Quine, and Nelson Goodman. This paper provides a detailed exposition and defense of the argument, filling out aspects that Ross left sketchy. In particular, it elucidates the argument’s relationship to its Aristotelian-Scholastic and analytic antecedents, and to Kripke’s work especially; and it responds to objections or potential (...)
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  29. Sarah McGrath (2011). Reply to King. Journal of Philosophical Research 36:235-241.score: 18.0
    In “Moral Disagreement and Moral Expertise” (2007), I offer an argument for the conclusion that our controversial moral beliefs do not amount to knowledge. In this paper, I defend that argument against the criticisms put forth by Nathan King in his “McGrath on Moral Knowledge.”.
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  30. Brad Hooker (1996). Ross-Style Pluralism Versus Rule-Consequentialism. Mind 105 (420):531-552.score: 18.0
    This paper employs (and defends where needed) a familiar four-part methodology for assessing moral theories. This methodology makes the most popular kind of moral pluralism--here called Ross-style pluralism--look extremely attractive. The paper contends, however, that, if rule-consequentialism's implications match our considered moral convictions as well as Ross-style pluralism's implications do, the methodology makes rule-consequentialism look even more attractive than Ross-style pluralism. The paper then attacks two arguments recently put forward in defence of Ross-style pluralism. One of (...)
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  31. H. H. Jack (1971). Utilitarianism and Ross's Theory of Prima Facie Duties. Dialogue 10 (03):437-456.score: 18.0
    This paper argues that ross's theory is an unsatisfactory compromise between moore's ideal utilitarianism and prichard's intuitionism. by including an 'optimific' principle, ross is exposed like moore to such difficulties as having to grant that we never know our duty and that logically we have a duty to pursue our own pleasure. in addition, this paper attributes to moore's influence ross's very inadequate treatment of justice; difficulties in his basic distinction of prima facie versus actual duties; and (...)
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  32. Anthony Skelton (2010/2012). William David Ross. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 18.0
    Presents and argues for a novel interpretation of Ross's distinctive contribution to moral theory and meta-ethics.
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  33. H. J. McCloskey (1963). Ross and the Concept of a Prima Facie Duty. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 41 (3):336 – 345.score: 18.0
    The concept of prima facie duty is deemed important by ross and the author. The author thinks ross and others have not elucidated the concept and the relation between prima facie and 'absolute' duty. He concludes that "we must explain the obligatoriness of absolute duties in terms of prima facie duties, As being derived from them, And not vice versa, As ross attempted." (staff).
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  34. Francesco Orsi (2012). David Ross, Ideal Utilitarianism, and the Intrinsic Value of Acts. Journal for the History of Analytic Philosophy 1 (2).score: 18.0
    The denial of the intrinsic value of acts apart from both motives and consequences lies at the heart of Ross’s deontology and his opposition to ideal utilitarianism. Moreover, the claim that acts can have intrinsic value is a staple element of early and contemporary attempts to “consequentialise” all of morality. I first show why Ross’s denial is relevant both for his philosophy and for current debates. Then I consider and reject as inconclusive some of Ross’s explicit and (...)
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  35. Paul Guyer (2008). Humean Critics, Imaginative Fluency, and Emotional Responsiveness: A Follow-Up to Stephanie Ross. British Journal of Aesthetics 48 (4):445-456.score: 18.0
    In ‘Humean Critics: Real or Ideal?’ (BJA 48 (2008): 20-28), Stephanie Ross argues that four of Hume's five criteria for qualified critics in “Of the Standard of Taste’, namely practise, comparison, freedom from prejudice, and good sense, should be understood as conditions for improving the basic constituent of taste, namely delicacy of perception, in real critics whose judgments can be canonical or guiding for the rest of us, but that delicacy of perception needs to be supplemented by what she (...)
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  36. Christopher Meyers (2003). Appreciating W. D. Ross:On Duties and Consequences. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 18 (2):81 – 97.score: 18.0
    In this article I describe the theoretical underpinnings of 20th-century British philosopher W. D. Ross's approach to linking deontological and teleological decision making. I attempt to fill in what Ross left on the whole unanswered, that is, how to use his duties to resolve dilemmas. A case study in journalism demonstrates how to apply the theory. I conclude with an analysis of what I take to be the strengths and weaknesses in Ross's theory.
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  37. Jonathan Cohen (2001). Subjectivism, Physicalism or None of the Above? Comments on Ross's The Location Problem for Color Subjectivism. Consciousness and Cognition 10 (1):94-104.score: 18.0
    In “The Location Problem for Color Subjectivism,” Peter Ross argues against what he calls subjectivism — the view that “colors are not describable in physical terms, ... [but are] mental processes or events of visual states” (2),1 and in favor of physicalism — a view according to which colors are “physical properties of physical objects, such as reflectance properties” (10). He rejects an argument that has been offered in support of subjectivism, and argues that, since no form of subjectivism (...)
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  38. Andrej Jandrić (2014). “The King of France is Bald” Reconsidered: A Case Against Yablo. Philosophical Studies 169 (2):173-181.score: 18.0
    Stephen Yablo has argued for metaontological antirealism: he believes that the sentences claiming or denying the existence of numbers (or other abstract entities or mereological sums) are inapt for truth valuation, because the reference failure of a numerical singular term (or a singular term for an abstract entity or a mereological sum) would not produce a truth value gap in any sentence containing that term. At the same time, Yablo believes that nothing similar applies to singular terms that aim to (...)
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  39. Jonathan Dancy (1998). Wiggins and Ross. Utilitas 10 (3):281-285.score: 18.0
    Ross's attempt to undermine the consequentialist understanding of the relation between duties and outcomes might give him greater defence against the danger that outcome-related duties will come to constitute a norm, to the disadvantage of all others.
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  40. Christopher Meyers (2011). Reappreciating W. D. Ross: Naturalizing Prima Facie Duties and a Proposed Method. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 26 (4):316-331.score: 18.0
    The goal of this article is to try to resolve two key problems in the duty-based approach of W. D. Ross: the source of principles and a process for moving from prima facie to actual duty. I use a naturalistic explanation for the former and a nine-step method for making concrete ethical decisions as they could be applied to journalism. Consistent with Ross's position, the process is complicated, particularly in tougher problems, and it cannot guarantee correct choices. Again (...)
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  41. Jeffrey Moriarty (2006). Ross on Desert and Punishment. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 87 (2):231–244.score: 18.0
    W. D. Ross thinks it is good, other things equal, that people get what they deserve. But he denies that "the principle of punishing the vicious, for the sake of doing so, is that on which the state should proceed in its bestowal of punishments." Ross offers two main arguments for this denial: what I call the "scope argument" and the "state's purpose argument." I argue that both fail. In doing so, I illuminate Ross's distinctive views about (...)
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  42. Karsten R. Stueber (2006). How to Structure a Social Theory?: A Critical Response to Anthony King’s the Structure of Social Theory. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 36 (1):95-104.score: 18.0
    s argument for the claim that social relations have to be conceived of as primary and main ontological category for an adequate analysis of the social realm. The author shows that King’s arguments do not succeed in fully replacing the categories of agency and structure that are pervasive in contemporary social theory. At most, King succeeds in delineating a neglected area of social theory, something that should be taken into account in addition to structure and agency. (...)
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  43. C. Anthony Hunt (2004). Martin Luther King: Resistance, Nonviolence and Community. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 7 (4):227-251.score: 18.0
    Martin Luther King, Jr drew upon his early grounding in family and church to forge a praxis of egalitarian justice in the rigidly segregated American South of his youth. King?s ethical outlook was eclectic, reflecting the influence of such figures as Mays, Davis, Rauschenbusch, Niebuhr, Thurman and Gandhi, alongside such doctrines as personalism and liberalism, nationalism and realism. Yet King?s subsequent academic study more nearly enhanced than restructured his early, formative exposure to black church and community. (...) became committed to nonviolence, not as passive resistance, but as an active, aggressive, individual and self?improving solution to problems of gross injustice in society. Nonviolence for King was not an end, but a means, to the achievement of what he called ?Beloved Community? (shrink)
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  44. Max Rosenkrantz (2007). The King of France Restored. Metaphysica 8 (2):149-163.score: 18.0
    Recent scholarship holds that unfulfilled definite descriptions do not play a role in motivating Russell’s theory of descriptions. In this paper, I make use of Gustav Bergmann’s ideal language method to develop an interpretation that restores the puzzle raised by ‘the King of France’ to the central place it once occupied in discussions of the theory of descriptions. In restoring ‘the King of France’, I show that Russell’s discussion of the problem it raises provides a decisive argument against (...)
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  45. B. C. Postow (2006). A Partial Application Procedure for Ross's Ethical Theory. Journal of Philosophical Research 31:239-248.score: 18.0
    W. D. Ross’s ethical theory requires us somehow to compare the metaphorical “weights” of different prima facie duties, but it leaves mysterious how this might be done. The formulation of a procedure to achieve such a comparison would be desirable on practical, theoretical, and pedagogical grounds. I formulate a procedure that is congenial to Ross’s theory. Central to my procedure are instructions to characterize the weight of each prima facie duty with respect to (a) the general stringency of (...)
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  46. Lewis V. Baldwin (2011). The Unfolding of the Moral Order: Rufus Burrow, Jr., Personal Idealism, and the Life and Thought of Martin Luther King, Jr. The Pluralist 6 (1):1-13.score: 18.0
    Much attention has been devoted in recent years to the personal idealism of Martin Luther King, Jr. Among the major contributors to the scholarship in this area is Rufus Burrow, Jr., who places King firmly in the tradition of personal idealism, or personalism, while also uncovering the intellectual unease that made King both a deep and creative thinker and a committed and effective social activist.1 Clearly, Burrow's own sense of his role as a personalist informs his approach (...)
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  47. Vincent Eltschinger (2013). Aśvaghoṣa and His Canonical Sources I: Preaching Selflessness to King Bimbisāra and the Magadhans (Buddhacarita 16.73–93). [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 41 (2):167-194.score: 18.0
    Aśvaghoṣa’s Buddhacarita contains two sharply argumented critiques of the non-Buddhists’ self: one against Arāḍa Kālāma’s (proto-)Sāṅkhya version of the ātman in Canto 12, and one of a more general import in Canto 16. Close scrutiny of the latter?s narrative environment reveals Aśvaghoṣa’s indebtedness, in both contents and wording, to either a Mahāsāṅghika(/Lokottaravādin) or—much more plausibly—a (Mūla)sarvāstivāda account of the events that saw the Buddha preach selflessness to King Bimbasāra and his Magadhan subjects. Besides hinting at this genetic relationship, the (...)
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  48. Douglas Sturm (1990). Martin Luther King, Jr., as Democratic Socialist. Journal of Religious Ethics 18 (2):79 - 105.score: 18.0
    This essay focuses on one aspect of the social thought of Martin Luther King, Jr.: his social ethics. Specifically, it poses the question whether, in what sense, and from what time it is correct to consider King a democratic socialist. The essay argues that King was in fact a democratic socialist and, contrary to the implications of some recent interpreters who have focused on transformation and radicalization in King's thought, that King's democratic socialism was (...)
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  49. Daryl Bem, On the Uncommon Wisdom of Our Lay Personality Theory: A Book Review Essay on Ross & Nisbett, the Person and the Situation: Perspectives of Social Psychology. [REVIEW]score: 18.0
    In The Person and the Situation , Ross and Nisbett seek to answer the question "What have we really learned from social psychology?" They offer their book as a "throwback to a golden age, a tribute to our intellectual forebears and as a 'stand tall and be proud' pep talk for our colleagues (p. xv)." They succeed splendidly on all these counts.
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