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  1. Roy F. Baumeister, Kathleen D. Vohs & E. J. Masicampo (2014). Maybe It Helps to Be Conscious, After All. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 37 (1):20-21.
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  2. Roy F. Baumeister & Bo M. Winegard (2014). Fashioning a Selfish Self Amid Selfish Goals. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 37 (2):136-137.
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  3. Michael R. Ent & Roy F. Baumeister (2014). Embodied Free Will Beliefs: Some Effects of Physical States on Metaphysical Opinions. Consciousness and Cognition 27:147-154.
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  4. Sarah E. Ainsworth & Roy F. Baumeister (2013). Cooperation and Fairness Depend on Self-Regulation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (1):79-80.
    Any evolved disposition for fairness and cooperation would not replace but merely compete with selfish and other antisocial impulses. Therefore, we propose that human cooperation and fairness depend on self-regulation. Evidence shows reductions in fairness and other prosocial tendencies when self-regulation fails.
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  5. Roy F. Baumeister, Jina Park & Sarah E. Ainsworth (2013). Individual Identity and Freedom of Choice in the Context of Environmental and Economic Conditions. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (5):484 - 484.
    Van de Vliert's findings fit nicely with our recent arguments implying that (1) differentiated selfhood is partly motivated by requirements of cultural groups, and (2) free will mainly exists within culture. Some cultural groups promote individual freedom, whereas others constrict it so as to maintain elites' power and privilege. Thus, freedom is, to a great extent, a creation of culture.
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  6. Roy F. Baumeister, A. William Crescioni & Jessica L. Alquist (2011). Further Thoughts on Counterfactuals, Compatibilism, Conceptual Mismatches, and Choices: Response to Commentaries. Neuroethics 4 (1):31-34.
    Further Thoughts on Counterfactuals, Compatibilism, Conceptual Mismatches, and Choices: Response to Commentaries Content Type Journal Article Pages 31-34 DOI 10.1007/s12152-010-9067-3 Authors Roy F. Baumeister, Department of Psychology, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL USA A. William Crescioni, Department of Psychology, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL USA Jessica L. Alquist, Department of Psychology, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL USA Journal Neuroethics Online ISSN 1874-5504 Print ISSN 1874-5490 Journal Volume Volume 4 Journal Issue Volume 4, Number 1.
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  7. Roy F. Baumeister, A. William Crescioni & Jessica L. Alquist (2011). Free Will as Advanced Action Control for Human Social Life and Culture. Neuroethics 4 (1):1-11.
    Free will can be understood as a novel form of action control that evolved to meet the escalating demands of human social life, including moral action and pursuit of enlightened self-interest in a cultural context. That understanding is conducive to scientific research, which is reviewed here in support of four hypotheses. First, laypersons tend to believe in free will. Second, that belief has behavioral consequences, including increases in socially and culturally desirable acts. Third, laypersons can reliably distinguish free actions from (...)
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  8. Roy F. Baumeister, E. J. Masicampo & C. Nathan DeWall (2011). Arguing, Reasoning, and the Interpersonal (Cultural) Functions of Human Consciousness. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 34 (2):74-74.
    Our recent work suggests that (1) the purpose of human conscious thought is participation in social and cultural groups, and (2) logical reasoning depends on conscious thought. These mesh well with the argument theory of reasoning. In broader context, the distinctively human traits are adaptations for culture and inner processes serve interpersonal functions.
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  9. Tyler F. Stillman, Roy F. Baumeister & Alfred R. Mele (2011). Free Will in Everyday Life: Autobiographical Accounts of Free and Unfree Actions. Philosophical Psychology 24 (3):381 - 394.
    What does free will mean to laypersons? The present investigation sought to address this question by identifying how laypersons distinguish between free and unfree actions. We elicited autobiographical narratives in which participants described either free or unfree actions, and the narratives were subsequently subjected to impartial analysis. Results indicate that free actions were associated with reaching goals, high levels of conscious thought and deliberation, positive outcomes, and moral behavior (among other things). These findings suggest that lay conceptions of free will (...)
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  10. Roy F. Baumeister (2010). 3 Understanding Free Will and Consciousness on the Basis ofCurrent Research Findings in Psychology. In Roy F. Baumeister, Alfred R. Mele & Kathleen D. Vohs (eds.), Free Will and Consciousness: How Might They Work? University Press. 24.
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  11. Roy F. Baumeister, Alfred R. Mele & Kathleen D. Vohs (eds.) (2010). Free Will and Consciousness: How Might They Work? University Press.
    This volume is aimed at readers who wish to move beyond debates about the existence of free will and the efficacy of consciousness and closer to appreciating ...
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  12. John Baer, James C. Kaufman & Roy F. Baumeister (eds.) (2008). Are We Free?: Psychology and Free Will. Oxford University Press.
    Do people have free will, or this universal belief an illusion? If free will is more than an illusion, what kind of free will do people have? How can free will influence behavior? Can free will be studied, verified, and understood scientifically? How and why might a sense of free will have evolved? These are a few of the questions this book attempts to answer. People generally act as though they believe in their own free will: they don't feel like (...)
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  13. John Baer, James C. Kaufman & Roy F. Baumeister (2008). Introduction: Psychology and Free Will. In John Baer, James C. Kaufman & Roy F. Baumeister (eds.), Are We Free?: Psychology and Free Will. Oup Usa.
     
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  14. Roy F. Baumeister (2008). Free Will, Consciousness, and Cultural Animals. In John Baer, James C. Kaufman & Roy F. Baumeister (eds.), Are We Free?: Psychology and Free Will. Oup Usa.
     
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  15. Kathleen D. Vohs & Roy F. Baumeister (2004). Ego-Depletion, Self-Control, and Choice. In Jeff Greenberg, Sander L. Koole & Tom Pyszczynski (eds.), Handbook of Experimental Existential Psychology. Guilford Press. 15--398.
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  16. Roy F. Baumeister & Kathleen D. Vohs (2003). Self-Regulation and the Executive Function of the Self. In Mark R. Leary & June Price Tangney (eds.), Handbook of Self and Identity. Guilford Press. 1--197.
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  17. Roy F. Baumeister & Kathleen D. Vohs (2002). The Collective Invention of Language to Access the Universe of Possible Ideas. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (6):675-676.
    Thought uses meaning but not necessarily language. Meaning, in the form of a set of possible concepts and ideas, is a nonphysical reality that lay waiting for brains to become smart enough to represent these ideas. Thus, the brain evolved, whereas meaning was discovered, and language was invented – collectively – as a tool to help the brain use meaning.
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  18. Roy F. Baumeister & Karen Pezza Leith (1997). Biased Steps Toward Reasonable Conclusions: How Self-Deception Remains Hidden. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (1):106-107.
    How can self-deception avoid intention and conscious recognition? Nine processes of self-deception seem to involve biased links between plausible ideas. These processes allow self-deceivers to regard individual conclusions as fair and reasonable. Bias is only detected by comparing broad patterns, which individual self-deceivers will not do.
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  19. Roy F. Baumeister & Karen Pezza Leith (1997). Biased Steps Toward Reasonable Conclusions: How Self-Deception Remains Hidden. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (1):106-107.
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  20. Roy F. Baumeister (1995). Transcendence, Guilt, and Self-Control. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (1):122-123.
    Transcendence, defined as the capacity to perceive the immediate stimulus environment in relation to long-range or abstract concerns, is a key aspect of self-control, and indeed self-regulation often breaks down because attention becomes focused exclusively on the immediate stimuli (i.e., transcendence fails). Factors that restrict attention to the here and now will weaken self-control, whereas factors that promote transcendence will enhance it. Guilt may be one example of the latter.
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  21. Catherine R. Delin & Roy F. Baumeister (1994). Praise: More Than Just Social Reinforcement. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 24 (3):219–241.
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