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  1. Rui Zhu (2013). Love in the Euthyphro. Apeiron 47 (1):1-15.
    Journal Name: Apeiron Issue: Ahead of print.
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  2. Rui Zhu (2006). "Kairos": Between Cosmic Order and Human Agency: A Comparative Study of Aurelius and Confucius. Journal of Religious Ethics 34 (1):115 - 138.
    In nontheistic moral traditions, there is a typical ethical conundrum concerning the relation between cosmic order and human agency. Within those traditions, it is generally recognized that the universe has its own order and history that are independent of human will. A moral discourse has to find space to accommodate human agency in the midst of the iron grid of cosmic law. Both Confucius and Aurelius use the concept of timeliness (kairos) to resolve the difficult issue. But their philosophies take (...)
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  3. Rui Zhu (2005). Distinguishing Sōtō and Rinzai Zen:. Philosophy East and West 55 (3):426 - 446.
    : Scholars have underestimated and misunderstood the distinction between Sōtō and Rinzai, the two major branches of Zen Buddhism, because they have either parroted the sectarian polemics of the schools themselves or, as in the case of prominent scholars Carl Bielefeldt and T. P. Kasulis, dismissed these polemics as deriving from institutional politics rather than substantive doctrinal or practical differences. Here it is attempted for the first time to understand the polemics of these two schools as reflecting a real disparity (...)
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  4. Rui Zhu (2003). Equality in Worth as a Pre-Condition for Justice in Greek Thought. History of Political Thought 24 (1):1-15.
  5. Rui Zhu (2002). What If the Father Commits a Crime? Journal of the History of Ideas 63 (1):1-17.
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  6. Rui Zhu (2002). Wu-Wei: Lao-Zi, Zhuang-Zi and the Aesthetic Judgement. Asian Philosophy 12 (1):53 – 63.
    The concept of wu-wei (nonaction) has undergone significant changes from Lao-zi to Zhuang-zi. This paper will argue that, while wu-wei in Lao-zi is a utilitarian principle, wu-wei of Zhuan-zi represents an aesthetic world-view. The aesthetic nature of the Daoist nonaction will be illustrated through Kant's concept of 'purposiveness without purpose'.
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