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  1. Russell Hardin (2013). Appendix to Chapter Two: Determinacy in Iterated Prisoner’s Dilemma. In Indeterminacy and Society. Princeton University Press. 139-140.
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  2. Russell Hardin (2013). Appendix to Chapter Four: Individually Cardinal Utility. In Indeterminacy and Society. Princeton University Press. 141-142.
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  3. Russell Hardin (2013). Chapter Eight. Mechanical Determinacy. In Indeterminacy and Society. Princeton University Press. 121-138.
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  4. Russell Hardin (2013). Chapter Five. Marginal Determinacy. In Indeterminacy and Society. Princeton University Press. 70-80.
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  5. Russell Hardin (2013). Chapter Four. The Greatest Sum. In Indeterminacy and Society. Princeton University Press. 55-69.
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  6. Russell Hardin (2013). Chapter One. Indeterminacy. In Indeterminacy and Society. Princeton University Press. 1-15.
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  7. Russell Hardin (2013). Chapter Seven. Indeterminate Justice. In Indeterminacy and Society. Princeton University Press. 102-120.
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  8. Russell Hardin (2013). Chapter Six. Rules for Determinacy. In Indeterminacy and Society. Princeton University Press. 81-101.
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  9. Russell Hardin (2013). Chapter Two. Beyond Basic Rationality. In Indeterminacy and Society. Princeton University Press. 16-40.
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  10. Russell Hardin (2013). Chapter Three. Mutual Advantage. In Indeterminacy and Society. Princeton University Press. 41-54.
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  11. Russell Hardin (2013). Deterrence and Moral Theory. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 16 (sup1):161-193.
    (1986). Deterrence and Moral Theory. Canadian Journal of Philosophy: Vol. 16, Supplementary Volume 12: Nuclear Weapons, Deterrence and Disarmament, pp. 161-193.
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  12. Russell Hardin (2013). Notes. In Indeterminacy and Society. Princeton University Press. 143-150.
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  13. Russell Hardin (2013). Preface. In Indeterminacy and Society. Princeton University Press.
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  14. Russell Hardin (2012). Hume's Human Nature. In Alan Bailey & Dan O'Brien (eds.), The Continuum Companion to Hume. Continuum. 303.
     
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  15. Russell Hardin (2010). The Costs and Benefits of Future Generations. In Christi Favor, Gerald F. Gaus & Julian Lamont (eds.), Essays on Philosophy, Politics & Economics: Integration & Common Research Projects. Stanford Economics and Finance.
     
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  16. Russell Hardin (2009). Acknowledgments. In How Do You Know?: The Economics of Ordinary Knowledge. Princeton University Press.
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  17. Russell Hardin (2009). Contents. In How Do You Know?: The Economics of Ordinary Knowledge. Princeton University Press.
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  18. Russell Hardin (2009). Chapter 8. Culture. In How Do You Know?: The Economics of Ordinary Knowledge. Princeton University Press. 161-184.
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  19. Russell Hardin (2009). Chapter 3. Democratic Participation. In How Do You Know?: The Economics of Ordinary Knowledge. Princeton University Press. 60-82.
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  20. Russell Hardin (2009). Chapter 9. Extremism. In How Do You Know?: The Economics of Ordinary Knowledge. Princeton University Press. 185-204.
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  21. Russell Hardin (2009). Chapter 6. Institutional Knowledge. In How Do You Know?: The Economics of Ordinary Knowledge. Princeton University Press. 121-134.
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  22. Russell Hardin (2009). Chapter 4. Liberalism. In How Do You Know?: The Economics of Ordinary Knowledge. Princeton University Press. 83-100.
  23. Russell Hardin (2009). Chapter 5. Moral Knowledge. In How Do You Know?: The Economics of Ordinary Knowledge. Princeton University Press. 101-120.
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  24. Russell Hardin (2009). Chapter 1. Ordinary Knowledge. In How Do You Know?: The Economics of Ordinary Knowledge. Princeton University Press. 1-27.
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  25. Russell Hardin (2009). Chapter. 2. Popular Knowledge Of Science. In How Do You Know?: The Economics of Ordinary Knowledge. Princeton University Press. 28-59.
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  26. Russell Hardin (2009). Chapter 7. Religious Belief And Practice. In How Do You Know?: The Economics of Ordinary Knowledge. Princeton University Press. 135-160.
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  27. Russell Hardin (2009). Deliberative Democracy. In Thomas Christiano & John Philip Christman (eds.), Contemporary Debates in Political Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell. 17--231.
  28. Russell Hardin (2009). How Do You Know?: The Economics of Ordinary Knowledge. Princeton University Press.
    Hardin presents an essentially economic account of what an individual can come to know and then applies this account to many areas of ordinary life: political participation, religious beliefs, popular knowledge of science, liberalism, ...
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  29. Russell Hardin (2009). Index. In How Do You Know?: The Economics of Ordinary Knowledge. Princeton University Press. 219-224.
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  30. Russell Hardin (2009). Preface. In How Do You Know?: The Economics of Ordinary Knowledge. Princeton University Press.
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  31. Russell Hardin (2009). References. In How Do You Know?: The Economics of Ordinary Knowledge. Princeton University Press. 205-218.
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  32. Russell Hardin (2009). Utilitarian Aggregation. Social Philosophy and Policy 26 (1):30-47.
    There can be no relevant cardinal assessment of the welfares of individuals that would allow traditional comparisons of average and total welfare of whole societies to be made. Given that cardinally additive welfare measures are unavailable, I work out some of the implications of an ordinal utilitarian analysis of international distributional issues. I first address the general problem of utilitarian comparisons between aggregates, then the nature of ordinal transfers between groups or nations, and then the complications that population growth in (...)
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  33. Russell Hardin (2008). Norms and Games. Philosophy of Science 75 (5):843-849.
    There are three centrally important ways in which norms have been elaborated and explained: in terms of religious or natural law strictures on behavior, in terms of constraints imposed by rationality, and, recently, in terms of agents' behavior in well‐defined games. The principal difficulty of a gaming account of norms is to show how the account explains motivations of individuals to follow the norms. This issue is examined in the context of small‐number norms and large‐number norms. †To contact the author, (...)
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  34. Russell Hardin, The Free Rider Problem. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  35. Karen S. Cook, Russell Hardin & Margaret Levi (2007). Cooperation Without Law or Trust [2005]. In Craig J. Calhoun (ed.), Contemporary Sociological Theory. Blackwell Pub.. 2--125.
  36. Russell Hardin (2007). David Hume: Moral and Political Theorist. Oxford University Press.
    Hume's place in history -- Moral psychology -- Strategic analysis -- Convention -- Political theory -- Justice as order -- Utilitarianism -- Value theory -- Retrospective.
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  37. Russell Hardin (2006). Ignorant Democracy. Critical Review 18 (1-3):179-195.
    The paradox of mass voting is not, generally speaking, matched by a paradoxical mass attempt to be politically well informed. As Converse underscored, most people are grossly politically ignorant—just as they would be if, as rational‐ignorance theory holds, they realized that their votes don't matter. Yet many millions of them contradict the theory by voting. This contradiction, and the illogical reasons people offer for voting, suggest that the logic of collective action does not come naturally to people . To equate (...)
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  38. Russell Hardin (2006). The Genetics of Cooperation. Analyse & Kritik 28 (1):57-65.
    Binmore analyzes the genetic basis of cooperation. Much of the literature doing this supposes that we must explain directly the cooperative tendency, whether by individual or group selection. A more effective way to go is to find something more general and likely more deeply embedded in personal traits that enables and even en- hances cooperation. Hume, with whom Binmore claims affinities, long ago proposed a psychological phenomenon now called mirroring, which induces good relations through shared sentiments in a way that (...)
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  39. Russell Hardin (2005). From Order to Justice. Politics, Philosophy and Economics 4 (2):175-194.
    We can observe in the progression of the work of Thomas Hobbes through David Hume to John Rawls a development from a focus on severe disorder to order under law and then to concern with distribution. This striking development is not due simply to changes of normative views, but is in large part about the technical or virtually technological capacities of government. There are also non-normative theoretical and significant developments in their theories. Hence, much of the difference between these philosophers, (...)
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  40. Russell Hardin (2005). Indeterminacy and Society. Princeton University Press.
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  41. Russell Hardin (2005). Liberalism, Constitutionalism, and Democracy. Philosophical Quarterly 55 (220):534-536.
     
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  42. Russell Hardin (2005). Migration and Community. Journal of Social Philosophy 36 (2):273–287.
  43. Russell Hardin (2004). Civil Liberties in the Era of Mass Terrorism. Journal of Ethics 8 (1):77-95.
    This paper discusses the impact of the so-called war on terrorism on civil liberties. The United States government in Madison’s plan was to be distrusted and hemmed in to protect citizens against it. The terrorist attacks of 2001 have seemingly licensed the US government to violate its Madisonian principles. While the current government asks for citizen trust, its actions justify distrust. The courts, which normally are the chief defenders of civil liberties, typically acquiesce in administration policies during emergencies, and it (...)
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  44. Russell Hardin (2004). Internet Capital. Analyse & Kritik 26 (1):122-138.
    The Internet is a huge form of social capital that is not reducible in its characteristics to other forms of social capital, such as ordinary networks of people who more or less know each other. It enables us to do many things with radically greater efficiency than we could without it. It can do some things better but other things much less well than traditional devices can. At both extremes, the differences are so great as to be not merely quantitative (...)
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  45. Russell Hardin (2004). Representing Ignorance. Social Philosophy and Policy 21 (1):76-99.
    If we wish to assess the morality of elected officials, we must understand their function as our representatives and then infer how they can fulfill this function. I propose to treat the class of elected officials as a profession, so that their morality is a role morality and it is functionally determined. If we conceive the role morality of legislators to be analogous to the ethics of other professions, then this morality must be functionally defined by the purpose that legislators (...)
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  46. Russell Hardin (2004). 11 Subnational Groups and Globalization. In Keith M. Dowding, Robert E. Goodin, Carole Pateman & Brian Barry (eds.), Justice and Democracy: Essays for Brian Barry. Cambridge University Press. 179.
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  47. Russell Hardin (2003). If It Rained Knowledge. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 33 (1):3-24.
    The author applies an economic theory of ordinary knowledge—street-level epistemology—to the popular understanding of science. Street-level theory is essentially economic and pragmatic. If it is very costly to learn something, you are less likely to learn it. If you need to know it, you are more likely to find out about it (although what you find out might be wrong). For most of what you know, you essentially rely on others as sources (some of these others might be "experts," but (...)
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  48. Russell Hardin (2002). Street-Level Epistemology and Democratic Participation. Journal of Political Philosophy 10 (2):212–229.
  49. Russell Hardin (2002). Trust: A Sociological Theory, Piotr Sztompka. Economics and Philosophy 18 (1):183-204.
  50. Russell Hardin (2002). Trust: A Sociological Theory, Piotr Sztompka. Cambridge University Press, 1999, Xii + 214pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 18 (01):183-204.
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