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  1. Russell T. Hurlburt, Christopher L. Heavey & Jason M. Kelsey (2013). Toward a Phenomenology of Inner Speaking. Consciousness and Cognition 22 (4):1477-1494.
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  2. Russell T. Hurlburt & Neda Raymond (2013). A Case Study in Bracketing Presuppositions: Agency. Journal of Consciousness Studies 18 (1).
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  3. Russell T. Hurlburt (2009). Unsymbolized Thinking, Sensory Awareness, and Mindreading. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (2):149-150.
    Carruthers views unsymbolized thinking as and, therefore, as a potential threat to his mindreading-is-prior position. I argue that unsymbolized thinking may involve (non-symbolic) sensory aspects; it is therefore not purely propositional, and therefore poses no threat to mindreading-is-prior. Furthermore, Descriptive Experience Sampling lends empirical support to the view that access to our own propositional attitudes is interpretative, not introspective.
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  4. Russell T. Hurlburt & R. T. Hurlburt (2009). Descriptive Experience Sampling. In Bayne Tim, Cleeremans Axel & Wilken Patrick (eds.), The Oxford Companion to Consciousness. Oxford University Press. 225--227.
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  5. Russell T. Hurlburt & Eric Schwitzgebel (2007). Describing Inner Experience? Proponent Meets Skeptic. MIT Press.
    On a remarkably thin base of evidence – largely the spectral analysis of points of light – astronomers possess, or appear to possess, an abundance of knowledge about the structure and history of the universe. We likewise know more than might even have been imagined a few centuries ago about the nature of physical matter, about the mechanisms of life, about the ancient past. Enormous theoretical and methodological ingenuity has been required to obtain such knowledge; it does not invite easy (...)
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  6. Russell T. Hurlburt & Eric Schwitzgebel (2007). Part One Proponent Meets Skeptic. In Describing Inner Experience? Proponent Meets Skeptic.
    On a remarkably thin base of evidence – largely the spectral analysis of points of light – astronomers possess, or appear to possess, an abundance of knowledge about the structure and history of the universe. We likewise know more than might even have been imagined a few centuries ago about the nature of physical matter, about the mechanisms of life, about the ancient past. Enormous theoretical and methodological ingenuity has been required to obtain such knowledge; it does not invite easy (...)
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  7. Russell T. Hurlburt & Sarah A. Akhter (2006). The Descriptive Experience Sampling Method. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 5 (3-4):271-301.
    Descriptive Experience Sampling (DES) is a method for exploring inner experience. DES subjects carry a random beeper in natural environments; when the beep sounds, they capture their inner experience, jot down notes about it, and report it to an investigator in a subsequent expositional interview. DES is a fundamentally idiographic method, describing faithfully the pristine inner experiences of persons. Subsequently, DES can be used in a nomothetic way to describe the characteristics of groups of people who share some common characteristic. (...)
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  8. Russell T. Hurlburt & Christopher L. Heavey (2001). Telling What We Know: Describing Inner Experience. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 5 (9):400-403.
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