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  1. Ruth Cigman (2014). Happiness Rich and Poor: Lessons From Philosophy and Literature. Journal of Philosophy of Education 48 (2):308-322.
    Happiness is a large idea. It looms enticingly before us when we are young, delivers verdicts on our lives when we are old, and seems to inform a responsible engagement with children. The question is raised: do we want this idea? I explore a distinction between rich and poor conceptions of happiness, suggesting that many sceptical arguments are directed against the latter. If happiness is to receive its teleological due, recognised in rather the way Aristotle saw it, as a final (...)
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  2. Ruth Cigman (2013). How Not to Think: Medical Ethics as Negative Education. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (1):13-18.
    An implicit rationale for ethics in medical schools is that there is a perceived need to teach students how not to think and how not to act, if they are to avoid a lawsuit or being struck off by the GMC. However, the imperative to keep within the law and professional guidance focuses attention on risks to patients that can land a doctor in trouble, rather than what it means to treat a patient humanely or well. In this paper I (...)
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  3. Ruth Cigman (2010). Introduction to Moral Philosophy and Moral Education. Journal of Moral Education 39 (2):253-255.
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  4. Ruth Cigman & Andrew Davis (eds.) (2009). New Philosophies of Learning. Wiley-Blackwell.
    Through contributions from an international range of leading empirical researchers and philosophers, the text explores the relationships between scientific and ...
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  5. Ruth Cigman (2008). Enhancing Children. Journal of Philosophy of Education 42 (3-4):539-557.
    The 'enhancement agenda' in educational policy is based on the idea that 'something affective', which supports and improves learning, can be a) measured and b) enhanced. This idea is explored, and it is argued that the identity of the 'something' that the enhancement agenda seeks to enhance is fatally obscure, as is the idea of measurable enhancement. Interpreted in Aristotelian terms as the desire to cultivate certain emotional dispositions, the idea of 'prevailing' on children morally makes good sense. Unlike the (...)
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  6. Ruth Cigman (2007). A Question of Universality: Inclusive Education and the Principle of Respect. Journal of Philosophy of Education 41 (4):775–793.
    The universalist argument that all children should be educated in inclusive mainstream schools, irrespective of their difficulties or disabilities, is traced to the claims that special schools and disability ‘labels’ are inherently humiliating, and that no decent society tolerates inherently humiliating institutions. I ask whether there is a sound reason for a child to feel humiliated by special schools/disability ‘labels’ as such, and find none. Empirically, some do and some do not find these humiliating, and it is argued that the (...)
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  7. Ruth Cigman (2004). Situated Self-Esteem. Journal of Philosophy of Education 38 (1):91–105.
    Pervasive though it is in modern life, the concept of self‐esteem is often viewed with distrust. This paper departs from an idea that was recently aired by Richard Smith: that we might be better off without this concept. The meaning of self‐esteem is explored within four ‘homes’: the self‐help industry, social science, therapy and education. It is suggested that the first two use a ‘simple’ concept of self‐esteem that indeed we are better off without. This concept eliminates the distinction between (...)
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  8. Ruth Cigman (2001). Self-Esteem and the Confidence to Fail. Journal of Philosophy of Education 35 (4):561–576.
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  9. Ruth Cigman (2000). Ethical Confidence in Education. Journal of Philosophy of Education 34 (4):643–657.
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  10. Ruth Cigman (1986). Moral Answerability. Philosophy 61 (237):355-.
    The Humean legacy in moral philosophy has given rise to the following familiar divergence of views: 1. Moral questions are questions of feeling. Rational discussion can occur given the acceptance of unreasoned commitments to values or principles, but it must not be thought that these values or principles can themselves be justified rationally. Moral disagreements may be resolved through persuasion, but it is appropriate for rational persons to be permanently irreconcilable in their moral views. 2. Moral questions are questions of (...)
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  11. Ruth Cigman (1982). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] British Journal of Aesthetics 22 (4):380-382.
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  12. Ruth Cigman (1982). "Understanding Persons": F. M. Berenson. [REVIEW] British Journal of Aesthetics 22 (4):380.
     
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  13. Ruth Cigman (1981). Death, Misfortune and Species Inequality. Philosophy and Public Affairs 10 (1):47-64.