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Ruth Groenhout [7]Ruth E. Groenhout [5]
  1. Ruth Groenhout (2014). Virtue and a Feminist Ethics of Care. In Kevin Timpe & Craig Boyd (eds.), Virtues and Their Vices. Oxford University Press. 481.
  2. Ruth Groenhout (2012). The “Brain Drain” Problem: Migrating Medical Professionals and Global Health Care. International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 5 (1):1-24.
    Brain drain, the migration of skilled labor out of less-developed countries, is an especially acute problem in the medical sector. Countries in the global South face enormous shortages of health-care workers. The most direct solution, to train more doctors and nurses, does not solve the problem because so many of those who are trained move to the global North to take advantage of higher salaries and an improved standard of living. Because we live in a world with porous boundaries and (...)
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  3. Ruth Groenhout (2010). The Difference Difference Makes : Public Health and the Complexities of Racial and Ethnic Differences. In Jackie Leach Scully, Laurel Baldwin-Ragaven & Petya Fitzpatrick (eds.), Feminist Bioethics: At the Center, on the Margins. Johns Hopkins University Press.
     
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  4. Ruth E. Groenhout (2009). Bioethics: A Reformed Look at Life and Death Choices. Faith Alive Christian Resources.
    Christians, health care, and basic moral reasoning -- When life ends -- Chronic illness, suffering, and Christian responses -- Organ donation and heroic medicine -- Scarce resources and Christian compassion -- Abortion -- Assisted reproduction and embryo selection -- Embryo research and cloning -- What happened to the neighbors? global health care -- The global challenge of HIV/AIDS -- Concluding thoughts.
     
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  5. Ruth Groenhout (2006). Review of Celia Deane-Drummond, Genetics and Christian Ethics. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2006 (9).
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  6. Ruth Groenhout (2006). Not Without Hope: A Reformed Analysis of Sickness and Sin. Christian Bioethics 12 (2):133-150.
    A Reformed understanding of sickness requires that connections be drawn between the structural effects of sin and the ways that sickness is experienced in people's lives. Such an understanding can be an important resource for the bioethicist, both the bioethicist who speaks from the Reformed tradition and the bioethicist who speaks to patients and caregivers who may assume that sin and sickness are connected, but may understand that linkage in overly simplistic ways.
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  7. Ruth E. Groenhout (2004). Connected Lives: Human Nature and an Ethics of Care. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
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  8. Ruth E. Groenhout & Marya Bower (eds.) (2003). Philosophy, Feminism, and Faith. Indiana University Press.
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  9. Ruth E. Groenhout (2002). Essentialist Challenges to Liberal Feminism. Social Theory and Practice 28 (1):51-75.
  10. Ruth Groenhout (1998). Care Theory and the Ideal of Neutrality in Public Moral Discourse. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 23 (2):170 – 189.
    In this paper I argue that Care theory has the resources to offer an insightful and original theoretical perspective on issues in medical ethics. The paper begins with a discussion of the sort of theory Care is, and argues that it closely resembles virtue theory. After a discussion of cammon features of Care theories, I respond to a few of the criticisme that have been levied against the theory. The final section of the paper is a discussion of the question (...)
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  11. Ruth Groenhout (1995). Book Review: Being in Time: Selves and Narrators in Philosophy and Literature. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Literature 19 (2):404-405.
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