Search results for 'Ruth Judith Horn' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Ruth Judith Horn (2012). Advance Directives in English and French Law: Different Concepts, Different Values, Different Societies. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis (1):1-14.score: 290.0
    In Western societies advance directives are widely recognised as important means to extend patient self-determination under circumstances of incapacity. Following other countries, England and France have adopted legislation aiming to clarify the legal status of advance directives. In this paper, I will explore similarities and differences in both sets of legislation, the arguments employed in the respective debates and the socio-political structures on which these differences are based. The comparison highlights how different legislations express different concepts emphasising different values accorded (...)
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  2. Ruth Horn (2013). Euthanasia and End-of-Life Practices in France and Germany. A Comparative Study. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (2):197-209.score: 120.0
    The objective of this paper is to understand from a sociological perspective how the moral question of euthanasia, framed as the “right to die”, emerges and is dealt with in society. It takes France and Germany as case studies, two countries in which euthanasia is prohibited and which have similar legislation on the issue. I presuppose that, and explore how, each society has its own specificities in terms of practical, social and political norms that affect the ways in which they (...)
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  3. Enola G. Aird, Allan C. Carlson, David Elkind, William A. Galston, S. Jody Heymann, Wade F. Horn, Bernice Kanner, Juliet B. Schor, Raymond Seidelman, Theda Skocpol, Ruy Teixeira, Cornel West, Peter Winn, Edward Wolff & Ruth A. Wooden (2002). Taking Parenting Public: The Case for a New Social Movement. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.score: 120.0
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  4. Sandra Orchard, Rolf Apweiler, Robert Barkovich, Dawn Field, John S. Garavelli, David Horn, Andy Jones, Philip Jones, Randall Julian, Ruth McNally, Jason Nerothin, Norman Paton, Angel Pizarro, Sean Seymour, Chris Taylor, Stefan Wiemann & Henning Hermjakob, Proteomics and Beyond : A Report on the 3rd Annual Spring Workshop of the HUPO-PSI 21-23 April 2006, San Francisco, CA, USA. [REVIEW]score: 120.0
    The theme of the third annual Spring workshop of the HUPO-PSI was proteomics and beyond and its underlying goal was to reach beyond the boundaries of the proteomics community to interact with groups working on the similar issues of developing interchange standards and minimal reporting requirements. Significant developments in many of the HUPO-PSI XML interchange formats, minimal reporting requirements and accompanying controlled vocabularies were reported, with many of these now feeding into the broader efforts of the Functional Genomics Experiment (FuGE) (...)
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  5. Larry Horn, Implicature.score: 60.0
    1. Implicature: some basic oppositions IMPLICATURE is a component of speaker meaning that constitutes an aspect of what is meant in a speaker’s utterance without being part of what is said. What a speaker intends to communicate is characteristically far richer than what she directly expresses; linguistic meaning radically underdetermines the message conveyed and understood. Speaker S tacitly exploits pragmatic principles to bridge this gap and counts on hearer H to invoke the same principles for the purposes of utterance interpretation. (...)
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  6. John Churchill, Ingolf Dalferth, Patrick Horn & Jeffery Willetts (2012). How Cool is the Philosophy of Religion? International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 71 (1):3-19.score: 60.0
    How cool is the philosophy of religion? Content Type Journal Article Category Article Pages 3-19 DOI 10.1007/s11153-011-9330-5 Authors John Churchill, Phi Beta Kappa National Office, Washington, DC, USA Ingolf Dalferth, Institute of Hermeneutics and Philosophy of Religion, University of Zurich, Kirchgasse 9, 8001 Zurich, Switzerland Patrick Horn, Claremont Graduate Center, Claremont, CA, USA Jeffery Willetts, Leland School of Ministries, Richmond, VA, USA Journal International Journal for Philosophy of Religion Online ISSN 1572-8684 Print ISSN 0020-7047 Journal Volume Volume 71 Journal (...)
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  7. Larry Horn, Toward a Fregean Pragmatics: Voraussetzung, Nebengedanke, Andeutung.score: 60.0
    In I. Kecskes & L. Horn (eds.) Explorations in Pragmatics: Linguistic, Cognitive, and Interculural Aspects. Mouton: 39-69.
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  8. Walter Horn (2013). The Roots of Representationism: An Introduction to Everett Hall. LAP Lambert.score: 60.0
    American philosopher Everett W. Hall (1901-1960) was among the first epistemologists writing in English to have promoted “representationism,” a currently popular explanation of cognition. According to this school, there are no private sense-data or qualia, because the ascription (representation) of public properties that are exemplified in the world of common sense is believed to be sufficient to explain mental content. In this timely volume, Walter Horn, perhaps the foremost living expert on Hall’s philosophy, not only provides copious excerpts from (...)
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  9. Brian Birch & Patrick Horn (2007). Religion and Friendly Fire: Examining Assumptions in Contemporary Philosophy of Religion – by D. Z. Phillips. Philosophical Investigations 30 (3):323–333.score: 30.0
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  10. Carolyn Culbertson (2013). The Ethics of Relationality: Judith Butler and Social Critique. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 46 (3):449-463.score: 18.0
    This article takes up the work of Judith Butler in order to present a vision of ethics that avoids two common yet problematic positions: on the one hand, the skeptical position that ethical norms are so constitutive of who we are that they are ultimately impossible to assess and, on the other hand, the notion that we are justified in our commitment to any ethical norm that appears foundational to our identity. With particular attention to the trajectory of Butler’s (...)
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  11. Shaun Young (2007). Avoiding the Unavoidable? Judith Shklar's Unwilling Search for an Overlapping Consensus. Res Publica 13 (3):231-253.score: 18.0
    No less an authority than John Rawls identified Judith Shklar as a ‘political’ liberal. However, though their respective conceptions of political liberalism are similar in a number of important respects, Shklar emphasizes that her vision differs notably from that of Rawls. In particular, she explicitly eschews Rawls’s focus on establishing and sustaining an overlapping consensus, arguing that his belief in the possibility of securing such a consensus is naïve and, indeed, dangerous insofar as it embodies an obvious disregard for (...)
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  12. Robert Frodeman (2008). Redefining Ecological Ethics: Science, Policy, and Philosophy at Cape Horn. Science and Engineering Ethics 14 (4):597-610.score: 18.0
    In the twentieth century, philosophy (especially within the United States) embraced the notion of disciplinary expertise: philosophical research consists of working with and writing for other philosophers. Projects that involve non-philosophers earn the deprecating title of “applied” philosophy. The University of North Texas (UNT) doctoral program in philosophy exemplifies the possibility of a new model for philosophy, where graduate students are trained in academic philosophy and in how to work with scientists, engineers, and policy makers. This “field” (rather than “applied”) (...)
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  13. Radim Bělohlávek & Vilém Vychodil (2006). Fuzzy Horn Logic I. Archive for Mathematical Logic 45 (1):3-51.score: 18.0
    The paper presents generalizations of results on so-called Horn logic, well-known in universal algebra, to the setting of fuzzy logic. The theories we consider consist of formulas which are implications between identities (equations) with premises weighted by truth degrees. We adopt Pavelka style: theories are fuzzy sets of formulas and we consider degrees of provability of formulas from theories. Our basic structure of truth degrees is a complete residuated lattice. We derive a Pavelka-style completeness theorem (degree of provability equals (...)
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  14. Radim Bělohlávek & Vilém Vychodil (2006). Fuzzy Horn Logic II. Archive for Mathematical Logic 45 (2):149-177.score: 18.0
    The paper studies closure properties of classes of fuzzy structures defined by fuzzy implicational theories, i.e. theories whose formulas are implications between fuzzy identities. We present generalizations of results from the bivalent case. Namely, we characterize model classes of general implicational theories, finitary implicational theories, and Horn theories by means of closedness under suitable algebraic constructions.
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  15. Marcel Jackson (2008). Flat Algebras and the Translation of Universal Horn Logic to Equational Logic. Journal of Symbolic Logic 73 (1):90-128.score: 18.0
    We describe which subdirectly irreducible flat algebras arise in the variety generated by an arbitrary class of flat algebras with absorbing bottom element. This is used to give an elementary translation of the universal Horn logic of algebras, and more generally still, partial structures into the equational logic of conventional algebras. A number of examples and corollaries follow. For example, the problem of deciding which finite algebras of some fixed type have a finite basis for their quasi-identities is shown (...)
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  16. Ruth Barcan Marcus, Walter Sinnott-Armstrong, Diana Raffman & Nicholas Asher (eds.) (1995). Modality, Morality, and Belief: Essays in Honor of Ruth Barcan Marcus. Cambridge University Press.score: 15.0
    Modality, morality and belief are among the most controversial topics in philosophy today, and few philosophers have shaped these debates as deeply as Ruth Barcan Marcus. Inspired by her work, a distinguished group of philosophers explore these issues, refine and sharpen arguments and develop new positions on such topics as possible worlds, moral dilemmas, essentialism, and the explanation of actions by beliefs. This 'state of the art' collection honours one of the most rigorous and iconoclastic of philosophical pioneers.
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  17. Eva-Maria Engelen (1996). Review On: Ruth Barcan Marcus, Modalities. Philosophical Essays, New York/Oxford (Oxford University Press) 1993. [REVIEW] Erkenntnis 44 (1):125-128.score: 15.0
    The great contribution Marcus has made to several of intensely discussed topics in philosophy might not have been noticed fully without this collection of some of her most important articles that makes it evident that her achievement is not limited to inventing the famous Barcan formula.
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  18. H. E. Porst (2000). The Essentially Equational Theory of Horn Classes. Mathematical Logic Quarterly 46 (2):233-240.score: 15.0
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  19. Alexej P. Pynko (2006). A Relative Interpolation Theorem for Infinitary Universal Horn Logic and its Applications. Archive for Mathematical Logic 45 (3):267-305.score: 15.0
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  20. Vilém Vychodil (2006). Continuous Fuzzy Horn Logic. Mathematical Logic Quarterly 52 (2):171-186.score: 15.0
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  21. Susanne Bobzien (2012). How to Give Someone Horns – Paradoxes of Presupposition in Antiquity. Logical Analysis and History of Philosophy 15:159-84.score: 12.0
    ABSTRACT: This paper discusses ancient versions of paradoxes today classified as paradoxes of presupposition and how their ancient solutions compare with contemporary ones. Sections 1-4 air ancient evidence for the Fallacy of Complex Question and suggested solutions, introduce the Horn Paradox, consider its authorship and contemporary solutions. Section 5 reconstructs the Stoic solution, suggesting the Stoics produced a Russellian-type solution based on a hidden scope ambiguity of negation. The difference to Russell’s explanation of definite descriptions is that in the (...)
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  22. Amy Allen (2005). “Dependency, Subordination, and Recognition: On Judith Butler's Theory of Subjection”. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 38 (3-4):199-222.score: 12.0
    Judith Butler's recent work expands the Foucaultian notion of subjection to encompass an analysis of the ways in which subordinated individuals becomes passionately attached to, and thus come to be psychically invested in, their own subordination. I argue that Butler's psychoanalytically grounded account of subjection offers a compelling diagnosis of how and why an attachment to oppressive norms – of femininity, for example – can persist in the face of rational critique of those norms. However, I also argue that (...)
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  23. J. J. C. Smart (1999). Ruth Anna Putnam and the Fact-Value Distinction. Philosophy 74 (3):431-437.score: 12.0
    This article is a defence of the Fact-Value distinction against considerations brought up by Ruth Anna Putnam in three articles in Philosophy, especially her ‘Perceiving Facts and Values’ January 1998. I defend metaphysical realism about facts and anti-realism about values against Putnam' intermediate position about both and I relate the matter to the logic of imperatives. The motivations of scientists or historians to select fields of investigation are irrelevant to the objectivity of their hypotheses, and so is the goodness (...)
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  24. Marcel Stoetzler (2005). Subject Trouble: Judith Butler and Dialectics. Philosophy and Social Criticism 31 (3):343-368.score: 12.0
    In this essay I explore the role of dialectics for how social theory can take account of the problem of structure and agency, or, determination and freedom, in a critical and emancipatory way. I discuss the limits and possibilities of dialectical, and of anti-dialectical, criticisms of Hegelian dialectics. For this purpose, I look at Judith Butler’s discussion of dialectics and the concepts of ‘sex’ and ‘gender’ in her writings between 1987 ( Subjects of Desire ; republished 1999) and 1990 (...)
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  25. E. Ferrarese (2011). Judith Butler's 'Not Particularly Postmodern Insight' of Recognition. Philosophy and Social Criticism 37 (7):759-773.score: 12.0
    Although Judith Butler regards recognition as the theme unifying her work, one finds a striking absence of dialogue between her and the authors of the normative theories of recognition – Honneth, Habermas, Ricoeur, etc. In the present article I seek to call into question this sentiment, shared by the two sides, of a radical theoretical heterogeneity. First I seek to show that the theory of performativity which Butler developed initially, contrary to all expectations, sets her relatively apart from the (...)
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  26. Sara Salih (2002). Judith Butler. Routledge.score: 12.0
    A welcome addition to the Routledge Critical Thinkers series, Judith Butler is the first guidebook on this renowned feminist and queer theory scholar, which will help not only students of literary criticism but also students of law, sociology, philosophy, film and cultural studies. Examining Butler's work through a variety of contexts, including the formation of gender performativity, identity and subjecthood, Sarah Salih address Butler's crucial ideas on the gender agenda, the body, pornography, race, gay self-expression and power and psychoanalysis. (...)
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  27. Alison Stone (2005). Towards a Genealogical Feminism: A Reading of Judith Butler's Political Thought. Contemporary Political Theory 4 (1):4.score: 12.0
    Judith Butler's contribution to feminist political thought is usually approached in terms of her concept of performativity, according to which gender exists only insofar as it is ritualistically and repetitively performed, creating permanent possibilities for performing gender in new and transgressive ways. In this paper, I argue that Butler's politics of performativity is more fundamentally grounded in the concept of genealogy, which she adapts from Foucault and, ultimately, Nietzsche. Butler understands women to have a genealogy: to be located within (...)
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  28. Terrell Carver & Samuel Allen Chambers (eds.) (2008). Judith Butler's Precarious Politics: Critical Encounters. Routledge.score: 12.0
    Judith Butler has been arguably the most important gender theorist of the past twenty years. This edited volume draws leading international political theorists into dialogue with her political theory. Each chapter is written by an acclaimed political theorist and concentrates on a particular aspect of Butler's work. The book is divided into five sections which reflect the interdisciplinary nature of Butler's work and activism: Butler and Philosophy: explores Butler’s unique relationship to the discipline of philosophy, considering her work in (...)
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  29. Christa Hodapp (2013). Giving an Account of Oneself by Judith Butler (Review). The Pluralist 8 (1):115-118.score: 12.0
    The chapters of Judith Butler's Giving an Account of Oneself originally were given as the Spinoza Lectures for the Department of Philosophy at the University of Amsterdam in the spring of 2002. In this work, Butler returns to the problem of subjectivity and subject formation, but this time in the context of ethics and ethical philosophy. Pulling together ethical considerations and theories of the self from authors including Nietzsche, Foucault, Adorno, and Levinas, Butler deftly and successfully decenters and refocuses (...)
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  30. Kathleen Dow Magnus (2006). The Unaccountable Subject: Judith Butler and the Social Conditions of Intersubjective Agency. Hypatia 21 (2):81-103.score: 12.0
    : Judith Butler's Kritik der ethischen Gewalt represents a significant refinement of her position on the relationship between the construction of the subject and her social subjection. While Butler's earlier texts reflect a somewhat restricted notion of agency, her Adorno Lectures formulate a notion of agency that extends beyond mere resistance. This essay traces the development of Butler's account of agency and evaluates it in light of feminist projects of social transformation.
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  31. Joris Vlieghe (2010). Judith Butler and the Public Dimension of the Body: Education, Critique and Corporeal Vulnerability. Journal of Philosophy of Education 44 (1):153-170.score: 12.0
    In this paper I discuss some thoughts Judith Butler presents regarding corporeal vulnerability. This might help to elucidate the problem of whether critical education is still possible today. I first explain why precisely the possibility of critique within education is a problem for us today. This is because the traditional means of enhancing a critical attitude in pupils, stimulating their self-reflective capacities, contributes to the continued existence and strengthening of the current societal and political regime. A way out of (...)
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  32. Noela Davis (2012). Subjected Subjects? On Judith Butler's Paradox of Interpellation. Hypatia 27 (3):881 - 897.score: 12.0
    Judith Butler's theory of the constitution of subjectivity conceptualizes the subject as a performative materialization of its social environment. In her theory Butler utilizes Louis Althusser's notion of interpellation, and she critiques the constitutive paradoxes to which its tautological framing leads. Although there is no pre-existing subject, as it is constituted in the turn to the interpellative hail, Butler nonetheless theorizes a guilt and compulsion acting on an “individual” that compels his or her turn to answer the hail. There (...)
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  33. Judith Felson Duchan (2000). Janet W. Astington, Paul L. Harris and David R. Olson, Eds., Developing Theories of Mind; Henry M. Wellman, the Child's Theory of Mind; Douglas Frye and Chris Moore, Eds., Children's Theories of Mind: Mental States and Social Understanding Judith Felson Duchan. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 10 (2):277-288.score: 12.0
  34. J. M. Fischer (2013). The Deterministic Horn of the Dilemma Defence: A Reply to Widerker and Goetz. Analysis 73 (3):489-496.score: 12.0
    I have argued that a proponent of the Frankfurt Cases as showing that the Principle of Alternative Possibilities is false can successfully reply to the Dilemma Defense. In their 2013 paper, Widerker and Goetz offer a critique of my view, especially as regards the deterministic horn of the dilemma. Here I clarify my strategy of response to the Dilemma Defense and reply to the critique developed by Widerker and Goetz.
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  35. Elena Loizidou (2007). Judith Butler: Ethics, Law, Politics. Routledge-Cavendish.score: 12.0
    The first to use Judith Butlers work as a reading of how the legal subject is formed, this book traces how Butler comes to the themes of ethics, law and ...
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  36. Brian Epstein (2006). Review of Millikan, Ruth Garrett, Language: A Biological Model. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2006 (5).score: 12.0
    Ruth Mil­likan is one of the most inter­est­ing and influ­en­tial philoso­phers alive. Her work is also hard to pen­e­trate. In this review, I try to present and assess her work on the nature of lan­guage, which is col­lected in this anthol­ogy. I also crit­i­cize her analy­sis of “nat­ural con­ven­tion” as well as her dis­cus­sion of illo­cu­tion­ary acts.
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  37. Ravinder Rena, Trends and Determinants of Poverty in the Horn of Africa - Some Implications.score: 12.0
    The poverty problem is chronic in the Horn of Africa. Majority of the people in the region are suffering from this problem. There are numerous factors that cause poverty in the region. The challenge of poverty reduction in the Horn should therefore address the poverty reduction issues at national, provincial and local levels. A brief survey of literature has been made to enable us understand some theories and models that are related to poverty reduction in the developing economies. (...)
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  38. Judith Felson Duchan (2000). Janet W. Astington, Paul L. Harris and David R. Olson, Eds., Developing Theories of Mind; Henry M. Wellman, the Child's Theory of Mind; Douglas Frye and Chris Moore, Eds., Children's Theories of Mind: Mental States and Social Understanding Judith Felson Duchan. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 10 (2):277-288.score: 12.0
  39. K. Forrester (2012). Judith Shklar, Bernard Williams and Political Realism. European Journal of Political Theory 11 (3):247-272.score: 12.0
    In light of recent interest among political theorists in the idea of political realism, Judith Shklar’s liberalism of fear has come to be associated with anti-Rawlsian thought. This paper seeks to show that, on the contrary, Shklar’s specific formulation of political realism, unlike more recent variations, was not motivated by a critique of Rawls. This paper will address three concerns: first, it will show what exactly Shklar’s initial realism was responding to; second, it will consider the implications of this (...)
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  40. Francis Jeffry Pelletier, On a Homework Problem of Larry Horn'S.score: 12.0
    Larry Horn is justifiably famous for his work on the semantics of the English conjunction or and both its relationship to the formal logic truth functions ∨ and @ (“inclusive” and “exclusive” disjunction respectively1) and its relationship to the ways people employ or in natural discourse. These interests have been present since his 1972 dissertation, where he argued for a “scalar implicature-based” account of many of these relationships as opposed to a presuppositional account. They have surfaced in his “Greek (...)
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  41. James Stanescu (2012). Species Trouble: Judith Butler, Mourning, and the Precarious Lives of Animals. Hypatia 27 (3):567-582.score: 12.0
    This article utilizes the work of Judith Butler in order to chart a queer and feminist animal studies, an animal studies that celebrates our shared embodied finitude. Butler's commentary on other animals remains dispersed and fragmented throughout books, lectures, and interviews over the course of the last several years. This work is critically synthesized in conjunction with her work on mourning and precarious lives. By developing an anti-anthropocentric understanding of mourning and precarious lives, this article hopes to create ontological, (...)
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  42. Jeff Mitchell (2012). On a Common Misconception of Ruth Benedict's Relativism. Teaching Philosophy 35 (1):29-40.score: 12.0
    In philosophy textbooks for undergraduates the cultural anthropologist Ruth Benedict is often cited as a proponent of moral relativism, and her writings are not infrequently excerpted to illustrate the view that the individual’s moral values are culturally determined. Because Benedict established that significant differences can exist in the underlying cultural patterns of different societies, her work is commonly construed as providing evidence for the arbitrary and non-rational basis of morals. The author of the present essay argues that this popular (...)
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  43. C. Leah Devlin & P. J. Capelotti (1996). Proximity to Seacoast: G. W. Field and the Marine Laboratory at Point Judith Pond, Rhode Island, 1896-1900. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 29 (2):251 - 265.score: 12.0
    By the time George Wilton Field concluded his work at the marine laboratory his initial scientific concerns had forced him directly into local politics. He pleaded with little success with the community of South Kingstown, and with no success with the town of Narragansett, to create and maintain a permanent breach:Is it not possible for the acute business sense and the broad philanthropy of the community to sweep aside petty, local, and personal jealousies which are now blocking practical progress for (...)
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  44. Larry Shapiro, The Book of Ruth.score: 12.0
    In every philosopher’s career, there comes a time to look back on accomplishments, assess achievements, evaluate one’s place in a canon that dates to an era when Ancient Greeks still roamed the Earth. Perhaps many of you have wondered when I’d finally get around to doing this. Sadly, this is not the night for that splendid occasion. Do not pretend to hide your disappointment. Also, do not hesitate to point fingers. Believe me when I tell you that I would take (...)
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  45. Courses I. Teach, Name Change.score: 12.0
    Please note that I now use my married name professionally and publish under the name "Delia Graff Fara" ("Fara, Delia Graff"), using the "Judith Jarvis Thomson"/ "Laura Ingalls Wilder "/ "Elizabeth Cady Stanton"/ "Hillary Rodham Clinton"/ "Ruth Barcan Marcus" convention ("Fara" as the last name, "Graff" as the middle name), and will use "Professor Fara" for formal purposes.
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  46. Stanley N. Burris & H. P. Sankappanavar (2013). The Horn Theory of Boole's Partial Algebras. Bulletin of Symbolic Logic 19 (1):97-105.score: 12.0
    This paper augments Hailperin's substantial efforts (1976/1986) to place Boole's algebra of logic on a solid footing. Namely Horn sentences are used to give a modern formulation of the principle that Boole adopted in 1854 as the foundation for his algebra of logic—we call this principle The Rule of 0 and 1.
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  47. Donka F. Farkas, To Appear in a Festschrift for Larry Horn Edited by Gregory Ward and Betty Birner.score: 12.0
    This paper explores the determiner corner of the ‘any’ land in Romanian, taking Lee and Horn 1994 and Horn 2000a as tour guides. The immediate interest of the task lies in the fact that the work done in English by the over-employed determiner any is carried out in Romanian by a host of more specialized (and, one fears, lower paid) morphemes, which I review in the rest of this section. My aim is to introduce the details of the (...)
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  48. A. L. Hall (2005). Ruth's Resolve: What Jesus' Great-Grandmother May Teach About Bioethics and Care. Christian Bioethics 11 (1):35-50.score: 12.0
    When thinking about the intersection of care and Christian bioethics, it is helpful to follow closely the account of Ruth, who turned away from security and walked alongside her grieving mother-in-law to Bethlehem. Remembering Ruth may help one to heed Professor Kaveny?s summoning of Christians to remember ?the Order of Widows? and the church?s historic calling to bring ?the almanahinto its center rather than pushing her to its margins.? Disabled, elderly and terminally ill people often seem, at least (...)
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  49. Vittorio Morato (2014). Explanation and Modality: On the Contingency Horn of Blackburn's Dilemma. Erkenntnis 79 (2):327-349.score: 12.0
    Can we explain why some propositions are necessary? Blackburn (Fact, science, and value. Blackwell, Oxford, 1987) has presented a dilemma aimed at showing that the necessity of a proposition cannot be explained either in the case where the explanans is another necessary proposition (necessity horn) or in the case where the explanans is a contingent proposition (contingency horn). Blackburn’s dilemma is intended to show that necessary truth is an explanatorily irreducible kind of truth: there is nothing that explains (...)
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  50. Judith Baker (1993). The Faces of Injustice Judith N. Shklar New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 1990, Vii + 144 Pp. [REVIEW] Dialogue 32 (01):197-.score: 12.0
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