1. Ruth Lister (2013). 'Power, Not Pity': Poverty and Human Rights. Ethics and Social Welfare 7 (2):109-123.
    ?Power, not pity? is a demand articulated by the Poor People's Economic Human Rights Campaign in the United States. The article discusses the ways in which some poverty activists are deploying an ethical discourse of human rights as a way of thinking about, talking about and mobilising against poverty and as a way of articulating concrete demands. They are staking a claim to power and to recognition as well as redistribution. It concludes that as an ethical discourse human rights performs (...)
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  2. Ruth Lister (2007). Mis)-Recognition, Social Inequality and Social Justice : A Critical Social Policy Perspective. In Terry Lovell (ed.), (Mis)Recognition, Social Inequality and Social Justice: Nancy Fraser and Pierre Bourdieu. Routledge.
     
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  3. Ruth Lister (1997). Dialectics of Citizenship. Hypatia 12 (4):6-26.
    Elements comprising a set of building blocks for a feminist reconstruction of citizenship might include: a critical synthesis of citizenship as a status and a practice; strengthening the inclusive side of citizenship (within and across nation-states); the principle of differentiated universalism, addressing tensions between an analysis grounded in difference and the universalism standing at the heart of citizenship; and a challenge to the binary thinking that constrains the articulation of women's claims to citizenship.
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