10 found
Sort by:
Disambiguations:
Ruth W. Grant [8]Ruth Weissbourd Grant [2]
  1. Ruth W. Grant (2011). Generous to a Fault: Moral Goodness and Psychic Health. In Ruth Weissbourd Grant (ed.), In Search of Goodness. University of Chicago Press.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Ruth W. Grant (2011). Strings Attached: Untangling the Ethics of Incentives. Princeton University Press.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Ruth Weissbourd Grant (ed.) (2011). In Search of Goodness. University of Chicago Press.
    The eight essays in this volume challenge the dichotomies that usually govern how goodness has been discussed in the past: altruism vs. egoism; reason vs. ...
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Ruth W. Grant & Jeremy Sugarman (2004). Ethics in Human Subjects Research: Do Incentives Matter? Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 29 (6):717 – 738.
    There is considerable confusion regarding the ethical appropriateness of using incentives in research with human subjects. Previous work on determining whether incentives are unethical considers them as a form of undue influence or coercive offer. We understand the ethical issue of undue influence as an issue, not of coercion, but of corruption of judgment. By doing so we find that, for the most part, the use of incentives to recruit and retain research subjects is innocuous. But there are some instances (...)
    Direct download (12 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Ruth W. Grant (2002). Political Theory, Political Science, and Politics. Political Theory 30 (4):577-595.
  6. Ruth W. Grant (2002). The Ethics of Incentives: Historical Origins and Contemporary Understandings. Economics and Philosophy 18 (1):111-139.
    Increasingly in the modern world, incentives are becoming the tool we reach for when we wish to bring about change. In government, in education, in health care, between and within institutions of all sorts, incentives are offered to steer people's choices in certain directions. But despite the increasing interest in ethics and economics, the ethics of the use of incentives has raised very little concern. From a certain point of view, this is not surprising. When incentives are viewed from the (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Ruth W. Grant (2000). Response to NASSP Book Award Panel. Social Philosophy Today 15:445-452.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Ruth W. Grant & Nathan Tareov (1997). A/V Libraries; $39.95 Seeondary Edueation, Town Libraries, Reli Gious Organizations. Teaching Philosophy 20 (2):233.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Ruth Weissbourd Grant (1997). Hypocrisy and Integrity: Machiavelli, Rousseau, and the Ethics of Politics. University of Chicago Press.
    Questioning the usual judgements of political ethics, Ruth W. Grant argues that hypocrisy can actually be constructive while strictly principled behavior can be destructive. Hypocrisy and Integrity offers a new conceptual framework that clarifies the differences between idealism and fanaticism while it uncovers the moral limits of compromise. "Exciting and provocative. . . . Grant's work is to be highly recommended, offering a fresh reading of Rousseau and Machiavelli as well as presenting a penetrating analysis of hypocrisy and integrity."--Ronald J. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Ruth W. Grant (1994). Integrity and Politics: An Alternative Reading of Rousseau. Political Theory 22 (3):414-443.