Disambiguations:
Ruth W. Grant [11]Ruth Weissbourd Grant [4]
  1.  27
    Ruth W. Grant & Jeremy Sugarman (2004). Ethics in Human Subjects Research: Do Incentives Matter? Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 29 (6):717 – 738.
    There is considerable confusion regarding the ethical appropriateness of using incentives in research with human subjects. Previous work on determining whether incentives are unethical considers them as a form of undue influence or coercive offer. We understand the ethical issue of undue influence as an issue, not of coercion, but of corruption of judgment. By doing so we find that, for the most part, the use of incentives to recruit and retain research subjects is innocuous. But there are some instances (...)
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  2.  1
    Ruth W. Grant (2011). Strings Attached: Untangling the Ethics of Incentives. Princeton University Press.
    Readers of this book are sure to view the ethics of incentives in a new light.
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  3.  50
    Ruth Weissbourd Grant (1997). Hypocrisy and Integrity: Machiavelli, Rousseau, and the Ethics of Politics. University of Chicago Press.
    Questioning the usual judgements of political ethics, Ruth W. Grant argues that hypocrisy can actually be constructive while strictly principled behavior can be destructive. Hypocrisy and Integrity offers a new conceptual framework that clarifies the differences between idealism and fanaticism while it uncovers the moral limits of compromise. "Exciting and provocative. . . . Grant's work is to be highly recommended, offering a fresh reading of Rousseau and Machiavelli as well as presenting a penetrating analysis of hypocrisy and integrity."--Ronald J. (...)
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  4. John Locke, Ruth Weissbourd Grant & Nathan Tarcov (1996). Some Thoughts Concerning Education and, of the Conduct of the Understanding. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  5.  6
    Ruth W. Grant (2015). Rethinking the Ethics of Incentives. Journal of Economic Methodology 22 (3):354-372.
    Incentives are typically conceived as a form of trade, and so voluntariness appears to be the only ethical concern. As a consequence, incentives are often considered ethically superior to regulations because they are voluntary rather than coercive. But incentives can also be viewed as one way to get others to do what they otherwise would not; that is, as a form of power. When incentives are viewed in this light, many ethical questions arise in addition to voluntariness: What are the (...)
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  6.  30
    Ruth W. Grant (2002). The Ethics of Incentives: Historical Origins and Contemporary Understandings. Economics and Philosophy 18 (1):111-139.
    Increasingly in the modern world, incentives are becoming the tool we reach for when we wish to bring about change. In government, in education, in health care, between and within institutions of all sorts, incentives are offered to steer people's choices in certain directions. But despite the increasing interest in ethics and economics, the ethics of the use of incentives has raised very little concern. From a certain point of view, this is not surprising. When incentives are viewed from the (...)
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  7.  72
    Ruth W. Grant (2002). Political Theory, Political Science, and Politics. Political Theory 30 (4):577-595.
  8.  18
    Ruth W. Grant (1994). Integrity and Politics: An Alternative Reading of Rousseau. Political Theory 22 (3):414-443.
  9.  9
    Ruth W. Grant (2000). Response to NASSP Book Award Panel. Social Philosophy Today 15:445-452.
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  10. Ruth W. Grant & Nathan Tareov (1997). A/V Libraries; $39.95 Seeondary Edueation, Town Libraries, Reli Gious Organizations. Teaching Philosophy 20 (2):233.
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  11. Ruth W. Grant (2011). Generous to a Fault: Moral Goodness and Psychic Health. In Ruth Weissbourd Grant (ed.), In Search of Goodness. University of Chicago Press
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  12. Ruth W. Grant (1999). Hypocrisy and Integrity: Machiavelli, Rousseau, and the Ethics of Politics. University of Chicago Press.
    Questioning the usual judgements of political ethics, Ruth W. Grant argues that hypocrisy can actually be constructive while strictly principled behavior can be destructive. _Hypocrisy and Integrity_ offers a new conceptual framework that clarifies the differences between idealism and fanaticism while it uncovers the moral limits of compromise. "Exciting and provocative.... Grant's work is to be highly recommended, offering a fresh reading of Rousseau and Machiavelli as well as presenting a penetrating analysis of hypocrisy and integrity."—Ronald J. Terchek, _American Political (...)
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  13.  8
    Ruth Weissbourd Grant (ed.) (2011). In Search of Goodness. University of Chicago Press.
    The recent spate of books and articles reflecting on the question of evil might make one forget that the question of just what constitutes goodness is no less urgent or perplexing. Everyone wants to think of him- or herself as good. But what does a good life look like? And how do people become good? Are there multiple, competing possibilities for what counts as a good life, all equally worthy? Or, is there a unified and transcendent conception of the good (...)
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  14. Ruth W. Grant (ed.) (2006). Naming Evil, Judging Evil. University of Chicago Press.
    Is it more dangerous to call something evil or not to? This fundamental question deeply divides those who fear that the term oversimplifies grave problems and those who worry that, to effectively address such issues as terrorism and genocide, we must first acknowledge them as evil. Recognizing that the way we approach this dilemma can significantly affect both the harm we suffer and the suffering we inflict, a distinguished group of contributors engages in the debate with this series of timely (...)
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