Search results for 'Ruth Wilkinson' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Ruth Hannah Wilkinson (2010). Genetic Information: Important but Not “Exceptional”. [REVIEW] Identity in the Information Society 3 (3):457-472.score: 240.0
    Much legislation dealing with the uses of genetic information could be criticised for exceptionalising genetic information over other types of information personal to the individual. This paper contends that genetic exceptionalism clouds the issues, and precludes any real debate about the appropriate uses of genetic information. An alternative to “genetically exceptionalist” legislation is to “legislate for fairness”. This paper explores the “legislating for fairness” approach, and concludes that it demonstrates a fundamental misunderstanding of both how legislation is drafted, and how (...)
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  2. Ruth H. Wilkinson (2009). The Single Equality Bill: A Missed Opportunity to Legislate on Genetic Discrimination? Studies in Ethics, Law, and Technology 3 (1).score: 240.0
  3. Ruth Wilkinson (2009). When Is My Genetic Information Your Business? Biological, Emotional, and Financial Claims to Knowledge. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 19 (01):110-.score: 240.0
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  4. Ruth Wilkinson (2010). Unjustified Discrimination: Is the Moratorium on the Use of Genetic Test Results by Insurers a Contradiction in Terms? [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 18 (3):279-293.score: 240.0
    This paper considers the legal position of genetic test results in insurance law in England and Wales. The strict position is that this information is material to the decision of the insurer to offer insurance cover and should be disclosed by insurance applicants. However, the British Government and the Association of British Insurers have agreed to a moratorium on the use of genetic test results in insurance, which will run until 2014. The moratorium prohibits unfavourable treatment of insurance clients on (...)
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  5. Stephen Wilkinson (2003). Bodies for Sale: Ethics and Exploitation in the Human Body Trade. Routledge.score: 60.0
    Stephen Wilkinson asks what is it that makes some commercial uses of the body controversial, whether such arguments stand up, and whether legislation outlawing ...
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  6. Stephen Wilkinson (2010). Choosing Tomorrow's Children: The Ethics of Selective Reproduction. OUP Oxford.score: 60.0
    To what extent should parents be allowed to use reproductive technologies to determine the characteristics of their future children? And is there something morally wrong with parents who wish to do this? Choosing Tomorrow's Children provides answers to these (and related) questions. In particular, the book looks at issues raised by selective reproduction, the practice of choosing between different possible future persons by selecting or deselecting (for example) embryos, eggs, and sperm. -/- Wilkinson offers answers to questions including the (...)
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  7. Robert Wilkinson (ed.) (2000). Minds and Bodies: An Introduction with Readings. New York: Routledge.score: 60.0
    Written with the beginner in mind, Robert Wilkinson carefully introduces the reader to the fundamental components of the philosophy of mind. Each chapter is then helpfully linked to a reading from key thinkers in the field such as Descartes and John R. Searle.
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  8. T. M. Wilkinson (2011). Ethics and the Acquisition of Organs. OUP Oxford.score: 60.0
    Transplantation is a medically successful and cost-effective way to treat people whose organs have failed--but not enough organs are available to meet demand. Ethics and the Acquisition of Organs is concerned with the major ethical problems raised by policies for acquiring organs. The main topics are the rights of the dead, the role of the family, opt in and opt out systems, the conscription of organs, living organ donation from adults and children, directed donation and priority for donors, and the (...)
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  9. Mark Wilkinson (1997). Burning Straw Men Sheds Little Light: A Reply to Whiting and Kelly. Acta Biotheoretica 45 (1).score: 60.0
    Wilkinson (1991a) developed arguments that the distributions of primitive character states may delimit clades, and proposed a method that exploited the evidence of primitive character state distributions for inferring clades. Whiting and Kelly (1995) presented a critique of these ideas, arguing that they are logically incoherent and that the method does not succeed in its aims. This critique severely misrepresents the original arguments and the method, and amounts to no more than an attack on a straw man.
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  10. Tim Wilkinson (2013). Fine-Tuning the Multiverse. Think 12 (33):89-101.score: 60.0
    Research Articles Tim Wilkinson, Think , FirstView Article(s).
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  11. Stephen Wilkinson (2003). The Exploitation Argument Against Commercial Surrogacy. Bioethics 17 (2):169–187.score: 30.0
    It is argued that there are good reasons for believing that commercial surrogacy is often exploitative. However, even if we accept this, the exploitation argument for prohibiting (or otherwise legislatively discouraging) commercial surrogacy remains quite weak. One reason for this is that prohibition may well 'backfire' and lead to potential surrogates having to do other things that are more exploitative and/or more harmful than paid surrogacy. It is concluded, therefore, that those who oppose exploitation should concentrate on: (a) improving the (...)
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  12. Dominic Wilkinson & Julian Savulescu (2012). Should We Allow Organ Donation Euthanasia? Alternatives for Maximizing the Number and Quality of Organs for Transplantation. Bioethics 26 (1):32-48.score: 30.0
    There are not enough solid organs available to meet the needs of patients with organ failure. Thousands of patients every year die on the waiting lists for transplantation. Yet there is one currently available, underutilized, potential source of organs. Many patients die in intensive care following withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment whose organs could be used to save the lives of others. At present the majority of these organs go to waste.In this paper we consider and evaluate a range of ways (...)
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  13. T. M. Wilkinson (2004). The Ethics and Economics of the Minimum Wage. Economics and Philosophy 20 (2):351-374.score: 30.0
    This paper develops a normative evaluation of the minimum wage in the light of recent evidence and theory about its effects. It argues that the minimum wage should be evaluated using a consequentialist criterion that gives priority to the jobs and incomes of the worst off. This criterion would be accepted by many different types of consequentialism, especially given the two major views about what the minimum wage does. One is that the minimum wage harms the jobs and incomes of (...)
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  14. T. M. Wilkinson (2007). Individual and Family Decisions About Organ Donation. Journal of Applied Philosophy 24 (1):26–40.score: 30.0
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  15. Stephen Wilkinson (2007). Eugenics and the Criticism of Bioethics. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 10 (4):409 - 418.score: 30.0
    This article provides a critical assessment of some aspects of Ann Kerr and Tom Shakespeare's Genetic Politics: from eugenics to genome. In particular, I evaluate their claims: (a) that bioethics is too ‘top down’, involving normative prescriptions, whereas it should instead be ‘bottom up’ and grounded in social science; and (b) that contemporary bioethics has not dealt particularly well with people's moral concerns about eugenics. I conclude that several of Kerr and Shakespeare's criticisms are well-founded and serve as valuable reminders (...)
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  16. S. Wilkinson (2000). Is 'Normal Grief' a Mental Disorder? Philosophical Quarterly 50 (200):289-305.score: 30.0
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  17. Sally Sheldon & Stephen Wilkinson (1998). Female Genital Mutilation and Cosmetic Surgery: Regulating Non-Therapeutic Body Modification. Bioethics 12 (4):263–285.score: 30.0
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  18. Stephen Wilkinson (1999). Smokers' Rights to Health Care: Why the 'Restoration Argument' is a Moralising Wolf in a Liberal Sheep's Clothing. Journal of Applied Philosophy 16 (3):255–269.score: 30.0
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  19. Andrew Millington, Markus Eberhardt & Barry Wilkinson (2005). Gift Giving, Guanxi and Illicit Payments in Buyer–Supplier Relations in China: Analysing the Experience of UK Companies. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 57 (3):255 - 268.score: 30.0
    . This paper explores the relationship between gift giving, guanxi and corruption through a study of the relationships between UK manufacturing companies in China and their local component suppliers. The analysis is based on interviews in the China-based operations of 49 UK companies. Interviews were carried out both with senior (often expatriate) staff and with local line managers who were responsible for everyday purchasing decisions and for managing relationships with suppliers. The results suggest that gift giving is perceived to be (...)
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  20. Robert Wilkinson (2009). Nishida and Western Philosophy. Ashgate.score: 30.0
    Nishida's starting point -- Radical empiricism and pure experience -- Fichte, the neo-Kantians, and Bergson -- Nishida's later philosophy: the logic of place and self-contradictory identity.
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  21. T. M. Wilkinson (2007). Contagious Disease and Self-Defence. Res Publica 13 (4):339-359.score: 30.0
    This paper gives a self-defence account of the scope and limits of the justified use of compulsion to control contagious disease. It applies an individualistic model of self-defence for state action and uses it to illuminate the constraints on public health compulsion of proportionality and using the least restrictive alternative. It next shows how a self-defence account should not be rejected on the basis of past abuses. The paper then considers two possible limits to a self-defence justification: compulsion of the (...)
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  22. T. M. Wilkinson (2009). Reason, Paternalism, and Disaster. Res Publica 15 (2):203-211.score: 30.0
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  23. Matthew David & Iain Wilkinson (2002). Critical Theory of Society or Self-Critical Society? Critical Horizons 3 (1):131-158.score: 30.0
    This paper presents a critical comparative reading of Ulrich Beck and Herbert Marcuse. Beck's thesis on 'selfcritical society' and the concept of 'sub-politics' are evaluated within the framework of Marcusian critical theory. We argue for the continued relevance of Marcuse for the project of emancipatory politics. We recognise that a focus upon the imminent and spontaneous possibilities for radical social change within the 'sub-political' is a useful provocation to the high abstractionism of much critical theory, but suggest that such possibilities (...)
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  24. Stuart Brown, Diane Collinson & Robert Wilkinson (eds.) (1995). Biographical Dictionary of Twentieth-Century Philosophers. Routledge.score: 30.0
    This Biographical Dictionary provides detailed accounts of the lives, works, influence and reception of thinkers from all the major philosophical schools and traditions of the twentieth-century. This unique volume covers the lives and careers of thinkers from all areas of philosophy - from analytic philosophy to Zen and from formal logic to aesthetics. All the major figures of philosophy, such as Nietzsche, Wittgenstein and Russell are examined and analysed. The scope of the work is not merely restricted to the major (...)
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  25. Robert Wilkinson, On the Western Reception of Indian Aesthetics.score: 30.0
    This is an essay in comparative aesthetics. The history of the reception of Indian aesthetics in the UK is a history of non-reception. This essay argues that the reasons for this neglect go beyond cultural arrogance, and can be traced to deep differences in the philosophical presuppositions of Indian and Western aesthetics respectively, especially those rooted in non-Western goal of nirvana.
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  26. Diané Collinson, Dr Robert Wilkinson & Robert Wilkinson (1994). Thirty-Five Oriental Philosophers. Routledge.score: 30.0
    These are questions to which oriental thinkers have given a wide range of philosophical answers that are intellectually and imaginatively stimulating. Thirty-Five Oriental Philosophers is a succinctly informative introduction to the thought of thirty-five important figures in the Chinese, Indian, Arab, Japanese and Tibetan philosophical traditions. Thinkers covered include founders such as Zoroaster, Confucius, Buddha and Muhammed, as well as influential modern figures such as Gandhi, Mao Tse-Tung, Suzuki and Nishida. The book is divided into sections, in which an introduction (...)
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  27. T. M. Wilkinson (2001). Parental Consent and the Use of Dead Children's Bodies. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 11 (4):337-358.score: 30.0
    : It has recently become known that, in Liverpool and elsewhere, parts of children's bodies were taken postmortem and used for research without the parents being told. But should parental consent be sought before using children's corpses for medical purposes? This paper presents the view that parental consent is overrated. Arguments are rejected for consent from dead children's interests, property rights, family autonomy, and religious freedom. The only direct reason to get parental consent is to avoid distressing the parents, which (...)
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  28. T. M. Wilkinson (2007). Racist Organ Donors and Saving Lives. Bioethics 21 (2):63–74.score: 30.0
  29. Dominic Wilkinson, Guy Kahane & Julian Savulescu (2008). “Neglected Personhood” and Neglected Questions: Remarks on the Moral Significance of Consciousness. American Journal of Bioethics 8 (9):31 – 33.score: 30.0
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  30. Mark Wilkinson (1990). A Commentary on Ridley's Cladistic Solution to the Species Problem. Biology and Philosophy 5 (4):433-446.score: 30.0
    The cladistic species concept proposed by Ridley (1989) rests on an undefined notion of speciation and its meaning is thus indeterminate. If the cladistic concept is made determinate through the definition of speciation, then it reduces to a form of whatever species concept is implicit in the definition of speciation and fails to be a truly alternative species concept. The cladistic formalism advocated by Ridley is designed to ensure that species are monophyletic, that they are objectively real entities, and that (...)
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  31. T. M. Wilkinson (2007). The Confiscation and Sale of Organs. Res Publica 13 (3):327-337.score: 30.0
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  32. Dominic Wilkinson (2009). The Self-Fulfilling Prophecy in Intensive Care. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 30 (6):401-410.score: 30.0
    Predictions of poor prognosis for critically ill patients may become self-fulfilling if life-sustaining treatment or resuscitation is subsequently withheld on the basis of that prediction. This paper outlines the epistemic and normative problems raised by self-fulfilling prophecies (SFPs) in intensive care. Where predictions affect outcome, it can be extremely difficult to ascertain the mortality rate for patients if all treatment were provided. SFPs may lead to an increase in mortality for cohorts of patients predicted to have poor prognosis, they may (...)
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  33. Jeffrey S. Wilkinson & James E. Fletcher (1995). Bloody News and Vulnerable Populations: An Ethical Question. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 10 (3):167 – 177.score: 30.0
    A common occurrence in television news is the showing of graphic scenes of human suffering. It was hypothesized that viewing such scenes could be harmful to a segment of the population. A controlled experiment examined the impact of images showing victim blood inserted into into television news stories about auto accidents. The amount of blood shown was manipulated, resulting in three video versions, roughly in terms of low, medium, and high. Participants were measured beforehand on the variable of "locus of (...)
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  34. T. M. Wilkinson (2009). Daniel Sperling, Posthumous Interests: Legal and Ethical Perspectives. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 43 (4):531-535.score: 30.0
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  35. Dominic J. C. Wilkinson (2004). Selling Organs and Souls: Should the State Prohibit 'Demeaning' Practices? [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 1 (1):27-31.score: 30.0
    It is sometimes argued that practices such as organ-selling should be prohibited because they are demeaning to the individuals involved. In this article the plausibility of such an argument is questioned. I will examine what it means to demean or be demeaned, and suggest that the mere fact that an individual is demeaning themself does not provide sufficient justification for legal prohibition. On the contrary, such laws might be argued to be demeaning.
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  36. John Wilkinson (1961). The Concept of Information and the Unity of Science. Philosophy of Science 28 (4):406-413.score: 30.0
    An attempt is made in this paper to analyze the purely formal nature of information-theoretic concepts. The suggestion follows that such concepts, used to supplement the logical and mathematical structure of the language of science, represent an addition to this language of such a sort as to allow the use of a unitary language for the description of phenomena. (The alternative to this approach must be certain multi-linguistic and mutually untranslatable descriptions of related phenomena, as with the various versions of (...)
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  37. Dominic Wilkinson (2009). The Window of Opportunity: Decision Theory and the Timing of Prognostic Tests for Newborn Infants. Bioethics 23 (9):503-514.score: 30.0
    In many forms of severe acute brain injury there is an early phase when prognosis is uncertain, followed later by physiological recovery and the possibility of more certain predictions of future impairment. There may be a window of opportunity for withdrawal of life support early, but if decisions are delayed there is the risk that the patient will survive with severe impairment. In this paper I focus on the example of neonatal encephalopathy and the question of the timing of prognostic (...)
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  38. Robert Wilkinson, Nishida's Zen Aesthetic.score: 30.0
    [About the book] Comparative aesthetics is the branch of philosophy which compares the aesthetic concepts and practices of different cultures. The way in which the various cultures of the world conceive of the aesthetic dimension of life in general and art in particular is revelatory of profound attitudes and beliefs which themselves make up an important part of the culture in question. This anthology consists of entirely new essays by some of the leading, internationally recognised scholars in the field. The (...)
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  39. Timothy Wilkinson (2004). The Presidential Address I—Armchair Philosophy, Metaphysical Modality and Counterfactual Thinking. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 105 (1):1–23.score: 30.0
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  40. Diane Collinson, Kathryn Plant & Robert Wilkinson (2000). Fifty Eastern Thinkers. Routledge.score: 30.0
    Close analysis of the work of fifty major thinkers in the field of Eastern philosophy make this an excellent introduction to a fascinating area of study. The authors have drawn together thinkers from all the major Eastern philosophical traditions from the earliest times to the present day. The philosophers covered range from founder figures such as Zoroaster and Confucius to modern thinkers such as Fung Youlan and the present Dalai Lama. Introductions to major traditions and a glossary of key philosophical (...)
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  41. T. M. Wilkinson (2005). Bioethics, Bodies and Care(Ful Thinking). Res Publica 11 (1):75-83.score: 30.0
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  42. T. M. Wilkinson (2002). Last Rights: The Ethics of Research on the Dead. Journal of Applied Philosophy 19 (1):31–41.score: 30.0
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  43. Robert Wilkinson, Nishida, Aesthetics and the Limits of Cultural Borrowing.score: 30.0
    [About the book] In this book the editors brought together outstanding articles concerning intercultural aesthetics. The concept ‘Intercultural aesthetics’ creates a home space for an artistic cross-fertilization between cultures, and for heterogeneity, but it is also firmly linked with the intercultural turn within Western and non-Western philosophy. The book is divided into two parts, yet one can sense a clear unity throughout the whole book. This unity is related to the underlying subject that the different authors, each in their own (...)
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  44. Martin Wilkinson & Andrew Moore (1999). Inducements Revisited. Bioethics 13 (2):114–130.score: 30.0
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  45. Sue Wilkinson (1989). The Impact of Feminist Research: Issues of Legitimacy. Philosophical Psychology 2 (3):261 – 269.score: 30.0
    This paper examines issues of legitimacy surrounding feminist research in psychology, in relation to its current and future impact on the mainstream of the discipline. It argues that its relatively limited impact to date is due, in part, to the nature of feminist psychology, and, in part, to its interaction with the social institutions of psychology as a discipline. Further, the paper contends that the influence of the field may well remain relatively minor, however convincingly its potential benefits are argued, (...)
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  46. Robert Wilkinson, Tao Te Ching.score: 30.0
    Dating from around 300BC, Tao Te Ching is the first great classic of the Chinese school of philosophy called Taoism. Within its pages is summed up a complete view of the cosmos and how human beings should respond to it. A profound mystical insight into the nature of things forms the basis for a humane morality and vision of political utopia. The ideas in this work constitute one of the main shaping forces behind Chinese spirituality, art and science, so much (...)
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  47. Eve Garrard & Stephen Wilkinson (2006). Selecting Disability and the Welfare of the Child. The Monist 89 (4):482-504.score: 30.0
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  48. Davide Pisani, Michael J. Benton & Mark Wilkinson (2007). Congruence of Morphological and Molecular Phylogenies. Acta Biotheoretica 55 (3).score: 30.0
    When phylogenetic trees constructed from morphological and molecular evidence disagree (i.e. are incongruent) it has been suggested that the differences are spurious or that the molecular results should be preferred a priori. Comparing trees can increase confidence (congruence), or demonstrate that at least one tree is incorrect (incongruence). Statistical analyses of 181 molecular and 49 morphological trees shows that incongruence is greater between than within the morphological and molecular partitions, and this difference is significant for the molecular partition. Because the (...)
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  49. Sheila Ruth (1979). Methodocracy, Misogyny, and Bad Faith: Sexism in the Philosophic Establishment. Metaphilosophy 10 (1):48–61.score: 30.0
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  50. Robert Wilkinson (2002). Beauty Matters. British Journal of Aesthetics 42 (2):214-216.score: 30.0
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