Search results for 'S. A. S' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. S. W. A. (1894). Freese's Pro Murena M. Tullii Ciceronis Pro L. Murena Oratio Ad Indices. Edited with Introduction and Notes by J. H. Freese, M.A. London, Macmillan & Co.: 1894. Fp. 8vo. Price 2s. 6d. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 8 (10):467-.score: 1290.0
  2. S. A. (1890). Abbott's Latin Gate and Postgate's Sermo Latinus Sermo Latonus; a Short Guide to Latin Prose Composition. by J. P. Postgate. Pp. 90. Macmillan. 2s. 6d. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 4 (1-2):35-36.score: 1290.0
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  3. S. W. A. (1898). Middleton and Mills' Student's Companion to Latin Authors The Student's Companion to Latin Authors. By George Middleton, M.A. and Thomas R. Mills, M.A. London: Macmillan and Co., Limited. 8vo. 1896. Pp. Xii. 382. 6s. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 12 (08):422-423.score: 1020.0
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  4. S. W. A. (1888). The Epistles of Horace, Book I. With Introduction and Notes by E. S. Shuckburgh, M.A. Cambridge : University Press. 1888. 2s. 6d. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 2 (07):213-.score: 1020.0
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  5. Aaron Smuts (2012). It's a Wonderful Life: Pottersville and the Meaning of Life. Film and Philosophy 16 (1):15-33.score: 171.0
    Its a Wonderful Life (Capra, 1946) presents a plausible theory of the meaning of life: One's life is meaningful to the extent that it promotes the (...) good. Although this theory is credible, the movie suggests a problematic refinement in the Pottersville sequence. George's waking nightmare asks us to compare the actual world with a world where he did not exist. It tells us that we are only responsible for the good that would not exist had we not existed. I argue that this is a bad test. It fails when there are redundant causes. (shrink)
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  6. Maja Malec (2004). A Priori Knowledge Contextualised and Benacerraf's Dilemma. Acta Analytica 19 (33):31-44.score: 150.0
    In this article, I discuss Hawthorne'€™s contextualist solution to Benacerraf'€™s dilemma. He wants to find a satisfactory epistemology to go with realist ontology, namely with causally (...) inaccessible mathematical and modal entities. I claim that he is unsuccessful. The contextualist theories of knowledge attributions were primarily developed as a response to the skeptical argument based on the deductive closure principle. Hawthorne uses the same strategy in his attempt to solve the epistemologist puzzle facing the proponents of mathematical and modal realism, but this problem is of a different nature than the skeptical one. The contextualist theory of knowledge attributions cannot help us with the question about the nature of mathematical and modal reality and how they can be known. I further argue that Hawthorne'€™s account does not say anything about a priori status of mathematical and modal knowledge. Later, Hawthorne adds to his account an implausible claim that in some contexts a gettierized belief counts as knowledge. (shrink)
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  7. Sohail H. Hashmi (2010). The Rights of Muslim Women: A Comment on Irene Oh's the Rights of God. [REVIEW] Journal of Religious Ethics 38 (3):588-593.score: 144.0
    This review of Irene Oh's The Rights of God focuses on women's rights in Islamic theory and practice. Oh suggests that religious establishments, and the texts (...) they disseminate, often press believers to recognize and reject social problems, such as racial and gender discrimination. Islamic scholars and texts have played a more ambiguous role in efforts to recognize women's rights within Muslim states. Modernist intellectuals have used Islamic texts to support the advancement of women's rights, but members of the more conservative religious establishment have typically curbed or rejected these efforts. Muslim women themselves have established various responses to the question of Islam's compatibility with women's rights. While some embrace the value and compatibility of both, others reject the propriety of either Western conceptions of rights, or the Islamic tradition, as harmful for women. Muslim reformers and feminists have much to learn from comparative studies with other faith communities that have undergone similar struggles and transformations. (shrink)
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  8. Thomas Kesselring (1994). A Comparison Between Evolutionary and Genetic Epistemology or: Jean Piaget's Contribution to a Post-Darwinian Epistemology. [REVIEW] Journal for General Philosophy of Science 25 (2):293 - 325.score: 144.0
    The viewpoint of Evolutionary Epistemology (EE) and of Genetic Epistemology (GE) on classical epistemological questions is strikingly different: EE starts with Evolutionary Biology, the subject of which (...)
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  9. Roberto Luna-Arocas & Thomas Li-Ping Tang (2004). The Love of Money, Satisfaction, and the Protestant Work Ethic: Money Profiles Among Univesity Professors in the U.s.A. And Spain. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 50 (4):329-354.score: 144.0
    This study tests the hypothesis that university professors (lecturers) (in the U.S. and Spain) with different money profiles (based on Factors Success, Budget, Motivator, Equity, and (...)Evil of the Love of Money Scale) will differ in work-related attitudes and satisfaction. Results suggested that Achieving Money Worshipers (with high scores on Factors Success, Motivator, Equity, and Budget) had high income, Work Ethic, and high satisfaction with pay level, pay administration, and internal equity comparison but low satisfaction with external equity comparison. Careless Money Admirers (high Success but low Budget) had low intrinsic job satisfaction and low satisfaction with pay level and life. Apathetic Money Managers (low Evil and low Motivator) had the highest intrinsic job satisfaction and life satisfaction. Money Repellent Individuals (high Evil and low Success) had low income, work experience, Work Ethic, and low satisfaction with pay administration. Money does not provide the same motivation for people in all four money profiles. Results are discussed in light of the effectiveness of using money to reward people with different money profiles, intrinsic motivation, and unethical behavior. (shrink)
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  10. Zann Gill (2013). The Other Edge of Ockham's Razor: The A-PR Hypothesis and the Origin of Mind. [REVIEW] Biosemiotics 6 (3):403-419.score: 144.0
    Charles Darwins theory of evolution characterized all life as engaged in astruggle for existence”. To struggle requires internal data processing to detect and interpret patterns (...)to guide behavior, a mechanism to struggle for existence. The cognitive bootstrapping A-PR cycle (Autonomy | Pattern Recognition) couples the origin of life and mind, enabling their symbiotic co-evolution. Life processes energy to create order. Mind processes data to create meaning. Life and mind co-evolve toward increased functional effectiveness, using A-PR feedback cycles that reflect the two Laws deduced from Ockhams Razor. The Law of Parsimony is only one of two laws that have emerged from debate about Ockhams Razor. Less well known is theother edge of Ockhams Razor”, the Law of Succinctness which, when viewed through the lens of Charles Darwins theory of evolution, enables the A-PR Hypothesis to fulfill the criteria of Ockhams Razor. (shrink)
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  11. S. A. Law (1985). The Teaching of Medical Ethics From a Junior Doctor's Viewpoint. Journal of Medical Ethics 11 (1):37-38.score: 135.0
    This is a short paper covering my own views on the methods and reasons behind the teaching of medical ethics. All the whys and wherefores are discussed (...)
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  12. A. S. Cua (1983). Hsün Tzu's Theory of Argumentation: A Reconstruction. Review of Metaphysics 36 (4):867 - 894.score: 129.0
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  13. D. S. A. Renting (1996). The Manuscripts of Cicero's De Oratore: E is a Descendant of A. Classical Quarterly 46 (01):183-.score: 129.0
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  14. Randall S. Upchurch (1998). A Conceptual Foundation for Ethical Decision Making: A Stakeholder Perspective in the Lodging Industry (U.S.A.). [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 17 (12):1349-1361.score: 129.0
    The purpose of this study was to build upon previous ethical research; thereby, advancing the hospitality industry's understanding of ethical decision making in lodging operations. In (...)particular, this study reviewed: (a) the primary normative ethical precepts (i.e., egoism, benevolence, and principle) used as a criterion in ethical decision making, and (b) the predominant locus of analysis (e.g., individual, local, or cosmopolitan referent sources) used in applying ethical precepts to ethical decisions.The sample consisted of 500 lodging operations as randomly abstracted from the 1994 Hotel Travel Index produced by Reed Travel. The researcher selected full service, limited service, or as rooms-only lodging operations throughout the United States. A full service property offered guest rooms, meeting rooms, and food and beverage services. A limited service property offered a continental breakfast, small meeting facilities, and guest sleeping rooms. A rooms-only property only offered guest rooms. This purposive sampling process resulted in 198 usable surveys. (shrink)
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  15. A. S. Gratwick (1986). A Platonist's Plautus Gianna Petrone: Teatro antico e inganno: finzioni plautine. (Letteratura classica, 10.) Pp. 218. Palermo, Palumbo Editore, 1983. Paper, L.18,000. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 36 (02):225-227.score: 129.0
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  16. A. S. Owen (1913). Professor Earle's Classical Papers The Classical Papers of M. L. Earle, with a Memoir. Pp. Xxix + 298. 9″ × 6″. Columbia University Press and London: H. Frowde, 1912. 12s. 6d. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 27 (06):201-202.score: 129.0
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  17. S. A. Longstaff (1994). 'Missionary in a Dark Continent': Der Monat and Germany's Intellectual Regeneration, 19471950. History of European Ideas 19 (1-3):93-99.score: 129.0
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  18. Paul Katsafanas (2011). The Relevance of History for Moral Philosophy: A Study of Nietzsche's Genealogy. In Simon May (ed.), Nietzsche's 'On the Genealogy of Morality': A Critical Guide. Cambridge University Press.score: 126.0
    The Genealogy takes a historical form. But does the history play an essential role in Nietzsche's critique of modern morality? In this essay, I argue that (...)the answer is yes. The Genealogy employs history in order to show that acceptance of modern morality was causally responsible for producing a dramatic change in our affects, drives, and perceptions. This change led agents to perceive actual increases in power as reductions in power, and actual decreases in power as increases in power. Moreover, it led agents to experience negative emotions when engaging in activities that constitute greater manifestations of power, and positive emotions when engaging in activities that reduce power. For these reasons, modern morality strongly disposes agents to reduce their own power. Given Nietzsches argument that power has a privileged normative status, these facts entail that we have a reason to reject modern morality. (shrink)
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  19. Henry Stapp (2006). Comments on Shimony'sAn Analysis of Stapp's 'A Bell-Type Theorem Without Hidden Variables' ”. Foundations of Physics 36 (1):73-82.score: 126.0
    The hidden-variable theorems of Bell and followers depend upon an assumption, namely the hidden-variable assumption, that conflicts with the precepts of quantum philosophy. Hence from an (...) orthodox quantum perspective those theorems entail no faster-than-light transfer of information. They merely reinforce the ban on hidden variables. The need for some sort of faster-than-light information transfer can be shown by using counterfactuals instead of hidden variables. Shimonys criticism of that argument fails to take into account the distinction between no-faster-than-light connection in one direction and that same condition in both directions. The argument can be cleanly formulated within the framework of a fixed past, open future interpretation of quantum theory, which neatly accommodates the critical assumptions that the experimenters are free to choose which experiments they will perform. The assumptions are compatible with the TomonagaSchwinger formulation of quantum field theory, and hence with orthodox quantum precepts, and with the relativistic requirement that no prediction pertaining to an outcome in one region can depend upon a free choice made in a region spacelike-separated from the first. (shrink)
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  20. S. J. Booij, D. P. Engberts, V. Rodig, A. Tibben & R. A. C. Roos (2013). A Plea for End-of-Life Discussions with Patients Suffering From Huntington's Disease: the Role of the Physician. Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (10):621-624.score: 126.0
    Euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide (PAS) by request and/or based on an advance directive are legal in The Netherlands under strict conditions, thus providing options for patients (...) with Huntington's disease (HD) and other neurodegenerative diseases to stay in control and choose their end of life. HD is an inherited progressive disease characterised by chorea and hypokinesia, psychiatric symptoms and dementia. From a qualitative study based on interviews with 15 physicians experienced in treating HD, several ethical issues emerged. Consideration of these aspects leads to a discussion about the professional role of a physician in relation to the personal autonomy of a patient. Such a discussion can raise awareness that talking about end-of-life wishes with an HD patient is part of the legal, professional and moral responsibility of the physician, and that a letter of intent on behalf of the physician can improve active participation in the process. Discussion of these issues can help to advance the debate on euthanasia and PAS in HD and other neurodegenerative diseases. (shrink)
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  21. Peter Alward, Comments on David Johnston’s ÂœIdentity, Necessity, and Propositionsâ€.score: 126.0
               Johnston maintains that the notion of a proposition—a language independent (abstract) particular—can be dispensed with (...) in philosophical semantics and replaced with that of a propositional act. A propositional act is a component of a speech act that is responsible for the propositional content of the speech act. Traditionally, it is thought that a propositional act yields the propositional content of a speech act by being an act of expressing a proposition. And it is the expressed proposition that serves as the propositional content of the speech act. Johnston points out, however, that a propositional act is a structured event consisting minimally of a referential act, a predicative act, and a time-designative act. And on Johnston’s view, the propositional content is the structured propositional act itself. (Strictly speaking, Johnston analyzes sameness of propositional content in terms of sameness of propositional act type, from which I, perhaps rashly, inferred that the propositional content of a speech act should be taken to be the propositional act itself).            Johnston argues that a semantic analysis in terms of propositional acts enables us to reconcile the necessity of both, (1) Hesperus is Phosphorus (2) Phosphorus is Phosphorus with their intuitive difference in meaning, while maintaining the direct reference theory of proper names. Moreover, he argues that invoking propositional acts rather than propositions has the advantage of being able to capture the various senses in which distinct statements might be said to âœsay the same thingâ€, as well as that of ontological parsimony. I will address each of these claims in turn, but first, I want to point out that the propositionalist can easily reconcile the necessity of (1) and (2) with their intuitive difference in meaning, without forsaking direct reference. All one needs to do is invoke the Fregean idea that there is a meaning shift in âœthatâ€-clauses of (opaque) indirect discourse (and other) ascriptions.. (shrink)
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  22. Jim Bender (1998). What is so Disturbing About Jan Smiley's A Thousand Acres? Agriculture and Human Values 15 (2):153-160.score: 126.0
    Jane Smiley's award winning and disturbing novel, A Thousand Acres, invites a critical appraisal of a popular assumption for proponents of sustainable agriculture: that family farming (...)and sustainable agriculture are (at least indirectly) mutually reinforcing. This process begins with a plot that presents an Iowa multigenerational farm family headed by an acutely dominant father. Consequences of this dominance include subjugation of everyone involved with the farming operation, varieties of abuse of the daughters, and primitive non-environmental farming. Also in the novel three structural components of the family farm/rural setting aggravate the nightmarish situation: multigenerational participation in one farming operation, children remaining on the farm, uninterrupted, into adulthood, and the power of community appearances. It is argued that these components contribute not only to the family problems, but also to making the poor farming that emerges in this family not very coincidental. This analysis, if correct, raises many issues about farm structure and farming practices. They include how the younger generation(s) of family farm structures cope with their situations, whether aspects of family farms skew who decides to remain to farm, family farm ownership and transfer structure, how well farmers understand their own farms, and the case for voluntarism regarding environmental issues in farming. One theme throughout the essay is that the novel enables better recognition and appreciation of the subtle relationship between family problems and farming practices. (shrink)
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  23. Ezra Hasson (2013). 'Where There's a Will There's a Woman': Exploring the Gendered Nature of Will-Making. [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 21 (1):21-37.score: 126.0
    This paper explores the gendered nature of the formal will-making process. Longer female life expectancy means that women often make the final decision regarding the disposal (...)of relational assets. Inheritance is thus identified as a rare opportunity for them to enjoy power and control over family wealth. There are, however, questions as to whether that enjoyment may be inhibited by the presence of men. Drawing on a series of interviews conducted with professional legal practitioners this paper discusses how, when couples seek will-making advice together, that process is largely dominated and driven by women. It argues that this situation is primarily attributable to a combination of the multi-faceted nature of will-making and, crucially, womens position and role within the family. Having identified the possibilities available to women to exercise power and authority over men in this context, the paper concludes with a brief consideration of the potential implications for both practitioners and policy-makers. (shrink)
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  24. Edward M. Swiderski (1999). Vladimir Solov'ëV's €œVirtue Epistemology”. Studies in East European Thought 51 (3):199-218.score: 126.0
    I attempt to clarify the connection between two late texts by V.S. Solov'ëv: Justification of the Good and Theoretical Philosophy. Solov'ëv drew attention to (...) the intrinsic connection between moral and intellectual virtues. Theoretical Philosophy is the initial -- unfinished -- sketch of the dynamism of mind seeking truth as a good. I sketch several parallels and analogies between the doctrine of moral experience set out in Justification and the account of the intellect's dynamism based on immediate certitude set out in Theoretical Philosophy. Solov'ëv can thus be considered as a ‘virtue epistemologist’ in the current meaning given to this description. I conclude by suggesting that Solov'ëv's position on these questions does not easily cohere with the ‘impersonalism’ he appears to defend in Theoretical Philosophy. (shrink)
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  25. Edgar C. Boedeker Jr (2002). Phenomenological Ontology or the Explanation of Social Norms?: A Confrontation with William Blattner's Heidegger's Temporal Idealism. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 84 (3):334-344.score: 123.0
    Some of the most important contributions over the past two decades to understanding Heidegger's thought have been made by philosophers writing in English and sharing the (...)broad perspective of analyticor, perhaps better, “post-analytic” – philosophy. With Heidegger's Temporal Idealism, William Blattner has moved this approach several important steps forward. Like others in this recent movement, he interprets Heidegger not so much in the terms of existentialism or post-structuralism, as in those of the later Wittgenstein, classical American pragmatism, and neo-pragmatism. Also like other Anglo-American interpretations of Heidegger, Blattner's (1.) focuses primarily on the Sein und Zeit era; (2.) tends to steer away from Heidegger's analysis of authenticity and toward his analysis of Dasein's everydayness; (3.) accords an especially large role to Being-with (Mitsein) and the They (das Man) in the constitution of everyday meaning; and (4.) is particularly concerned with developing a view of the foundation ofmindand scientific knowledge in the practical abilities of Dasein as Being-in-the-world. Given the obvious centrality of time in SZ, it is surprising that there have been relatively few concerted attempts to critically explicate Heidegger's view of it. Blattner's book fills this gap by focusing on Heidegger's interpretation of Dasein'soriginary temporality”, as explicated in Division Two of SZ. (shrink)
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  26. Dan Webb (2009). `If Adorno Isn'T the Devil, It's Because He's a Jew': Lyotard's Misreading of Adorno Through Thomas Mann's Dr Faustus. Philosophy and Social Criticism 35 (5):517-531.score: 123.0
    In this article, I explore the relationship between the philosophy of Theodor Adorno and the Bilderverbot , or biblical Second Commandment against images. My starting point is J (...). F. Lyotard's construction of the melancholic sublime in his essay `What is the Postmodern?', which I argue he uses to critique Adorno's aesthetics, and, more generally, his position as a `modern' thinker. To prove that Lyotard had Adorno in mind when he constructed the category of the melancholic sublime, I return to an earlier piece by Lyotard — `Adorno as the Devil' — which is a reading of Thomas Mann's Dr Faustus , in which Adorno is said to be one of the faces of the Devil. My argument is that Lyotard's understanding of Adorno is flawed because he does not recognize the distinctly Jewish, albeit secularized, character of his thought. I set out to challenge Lyotard by demonstrating the central importance that the Bilderverbot plays in Adorno's work, which should not be understood as melancholic because the Jewish Messianism associated with the Bilderverbot is profoundly future-oriented. In short, I argue that Lyotard's depiction of Adorno is flawed because he reads him as a Christian, while he should be approaching him as a secularized Jew. Key Words: Theodor Adornoaesthetic theoryDr Faustusthe image prohibitionJewish thoughtJean-François LyotardThomas MannMessianismrepresentationthe sublime. (shrink)
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  27. Joseph W. Long (2002). Who's a Pragmatist: Distinguishing Epistemic Pragmatism and Contextualism. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 16 (1):39-49.score: 123.0
    There is a tendency among contemporary epistemologists to call every social or existential theory of knowledge pragmatism or neopragmatism. In this paper, I hope to show that (...)
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  28. Anna Marmodoro (2006). It's a Colorful World. American Philosophical Quarterly 43 (1):71 - 80.score: 123.0
    Its a Colorful World’, American Philosophical Quarterly, 43:1, pp. 71-80, 2006. Abstract: I defend the intuition that the phenomenology of our experience is right in (...)
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  29. P. H. Brazier (2014). 'Godor a Bad, or Mad, Man': C.S. Lewis's Argument for ChristA Systematic Theological, Historical and Philosophical Analysis of Aut Deus Aut Malus Homo. Heythrop Journal 55 (1):1-30.score: 123.0
    The proposition that Jesus wasBad, Mad or Godis central to C.S. Lewis's popular apologetics. It is fêted by American Evangelicals, cautiously endorsed by Roman (...) Catholics and Protestants, but often scorned by philosophers of religion. Most, mistakenly, regard Lewis's trilemma as unique. This paper examines the roots of this proposition in a two thousand year old theological and philosophical tradition (that is, aut Deus aut malus homo), grounded in the Johannine trilemma (‘unbalanced liar’, ordemonically possessed’, orthe God of Israel come amongst his people’). Jesus can only be understood in the context of the Jewish religious categories he was born into; therefore, for Lewis, Jesus is who he reveals himself to be. Jesus' self-understanding reflects his identity, his triune salvific role; this is for Lewis, the transposed reality of divine Sonship. Reason and logic are paramount here, reflected in the structure of Lewis's argument. Lewis's trilemma is not so much a proof of God's existence, but a question, a dilemma, where each and every person must come to a decision. For all its perceived faults, its simplistic language, Lewis's trilemma still is a very successful piece of Christian apologetic, grounded in a serious philosophical and theological tradition. (shrink)
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  30. Matteo Galletti (2006). Begetting, Cloning and Being Human: Two National Commission Reports Against Human Cloning From Italy and the U.s.A. HEC Forum 18 (2):156-171.score: 123.0
    The aim of this paper is to compare two reports on human cloning, one by the US Presidents Council on Bioethics and one by the Italian (...)Comitato Nazionale per la Bioetica. I shall focus on those arguments against human cloning, in both reports, which are articulated in terms of (a) the development of human identity, (b) the meaning of human reproduction, and (c) the nature of family relationships. My general conclusion will be that the arguments against human cloning put forth by both reports are not sound, because they are grounded on the dubious assumption that there is anatural wayof thinking about identity, reproduction, and family relationships. (shrink)
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  31. Abner Shimony (2006). An Analysis of Stapp'sA Bell-Type Theorem Without Hidden Variables”. Foundations of Physics 36 (1):61-72.score: 123.0
    H.P. Stapp has proposed a number of demonstrations of a Bell-type theorem which dispensed with an assumption of hidden variables, but relied only upon locality together (...) with an assumption that experimenters can choose freely which of several incompatible observables to measure. In recent papers his strategy has centered upon counterfactual conditionals. Stapps paper in American Journal of Physics, 2004, replies to objections raised against earlier expositions of this strategy and proposes a simplified demonstration. The new demonstration is criticized, several subtleties in the logic of counterfactuals are pointed out, and the proofs of J.S. Bell and his followers are advocated. (shrink)
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  32. Marc Champagne (2012). One's a Crowd? On Greenwood's Delimitation of the Social. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 43 (4):0048393112454335.score: 123.0
    In an effort to carve a distinct place for social facts without lapsing into a holistic ontology, John Greenwood has sought to define social phenomena solely in (...)
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  33. Antonopoulos Constantin (2011). Passive Knowledge: How to Make Sense of Kant's A Priori - Or How Not to BeToo Busily Subsuming”. Open Journal of Philosophy 1 (2):39.score: 123.0
    Subjectivists, taking thecollapseof the observation-interpretation contrast much too seriously, are led to imagine that even perceptual knowledge is active. And therefore subject dependent. Turning (...)the tables on this popular trend, I argue that even conceptual knowledge is passive. Kants epistemology is conceptual. But if also active, then incoherent. If synthetic a priori truths are to follow upon our mental activity, they were neither true nor, far less, a priori before that activity. “A prioriandactiveare contradictory attributes of knowledge. As, indeed, area prioriandsubject-dependentto begin with. Nothing a priori can be dependent on anything except itself, and least of all on the human subject. Kant does consider the active aspect of thought. The difference is that for him the more active it becomes, the less it is to be trusted. For we are no longer in the province of the Understanding, and its necessary truths, but in the realm of Pure Reason and its dialectical antinomies. Cognition activists who take a liking to Kant have simply mistaken Reason for the Understanding. And Reason is to Kantthe seat of all transcendental illusion”. (shrink)
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  34. Edgar J. Valdez (2012). Kant's A Priori Intuition of Space Independent of Postulates. Kantian Review 17 (1):135-160.score: 123.0
    Defences of Kant's foundations of geometry fall short if they are unable to equally ground Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometries. Thus, Kant's account must be separated (...)
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  35. Peter Alward, Comments on Heidi Tiedke’s Œis Knowledge Ever Constitutive of Freedom?€.score: 123.0
    Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â According to Tiedke, in order for an act to be free it must satisfy two requirements: (...)
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  36. Fabian Schuppert (2013). Discursive Control, Non-Domination and Hegelian Recognition Theory: Marrying Pettit's Account(s) of Freedom with a Pippinian/Brandomian Reading of Hegelian Agency. Philosophy and Social Criticism 39 (9):0191453713498389.score: 123.0
    The aim of this article is to combine Pettits account(s) of freedom, both his work on discursive control and on non-domination, with Pippins and (...)Brandoms reinterpretation of Hegelian rational agency and the role of recognition theory within it. The benefits of combining these two theories lie, as the article hopes to show, in three findings: first, re-examining Hegelian agency in the spirit of Brandom and Pippin in combination with Pettits views on freedom shows clearly why and in which way a Hegelian account of rational agency can ground an attractive socio-political account of freedom; second, the reconciling of discursive control and non-domination with Hegelian agency shows how the force and scope of recognition become finally tangible, without either falling into the trap of overburdening the concept, or merely reducing it to the idea of simple respect; third, the arguments from this article also highlight the importance of freedom as non-domination and how this notion is, indeed, as Pettit himself claims, an agency-freedom which aims at successfully securing the social, political, economic and even (some) psychological conditions for free and autonomous agency. (shrink)
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  37. Peter Johnson (2006). God in the Marketplace: A Reconsideration of Robert Watts as an Early Critic of J.S. Mill's Utilitarianism. History of Political Thought 27 (3):487-504.score: 123.0
    This article examines the arguments used by Robert Watts, a contemporary of John Stuart Mill, in his criticism of Mill's Utilitarianism. The pamphlet in which Watts (...)expresses his views is a scarce and neglected work. Pioneering studies by J.C. Rees and J.B. Schneewind emphasize the importance of Mill's early critics for historians of nineteenth-century ethics and politial thought. Rees, however, confines his study to the responses to Mill's On Liberty. Schneewind's work is more comprehensive and does mention Watts, but without examining in detail the actual arguments that Watts uses. Further, while Watts criticizes Mill's ethical views from a theological standpoint the arguments he uses are philosophical in character. Watts should not be thought of as a major philosophical critic of Mill, but his relative neglect leaves a gap in the study of the reception of Mill's thought which this article is intended to fill. (shrink)
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  38. Paola Rudan (2013). Securing the Future: Jeremy Bentham's a Fragment on Government and the American Revolution. History of Political Thought 34 (3):479-506.score: 123.0
    The article suggests that A Fragment on Government can be read as Bentham's contribution to the American Controversy. Though the contemporary vicissitudes are never mentioned in (...)the text, Bentham's intellectual relationship with John Lind shows his interest in them. It is argued that Bentham criticizes the political discourses adopted both by the Americans and the supporters of the British Government. Bentham's legal positivism appears to be both a way of interpreting the constitutional aspect of the imperial relationship, and the basis of a new science of sovereignty. (shrink)
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  39. Hub Zwart (2004). Environmental Pollution and Professional Responsibility: Ibsen's "A Public Enemy" as a Seminar on Science Communication and Ethics. Environmental Values 13 (3):349 - 372.score: 123.0
    Dr Stockmann, the principal character in Henrik Ibsen's A Public Enemy, is a classic example of a whistle-blower who, upon detecting and disclosing a serious case (...) of environmental pollution, quickly finds himself transformed from a public benefactor into a political outcast by those in power. If we submit the play to a 'second reading', however, it becomes clear that the ethical intricacies of whistle-blowing are interwoven with epistemological issues. Basically, the play is about the complex task of communicating scientific (notably microbiological) data to lay audiences. This becomes even more apparent when we realise that Stockmann was a contemporary of real 'microbe hunters' such as Pasteur and Koch. The play's basic message is that epoch-making scientists (such as Pasteur and Koch) not only produced convincing and reliable data from a scientific point of view, but also acquired the skills and insights needed to enter into a dialogue with their cultural and societal environment. (shrink)
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  40. Sandrine Berges (2013). Routledge Guidebook to Wollstonecraft's A Vindiciation of the Rights of Woman. Routledge.score: 123.0
    Mary Wollstonecraft was one of the greatest philosophers and writers of the Eighteenth century. During her brief career, she wrote novels, treatises, a travel narrative, a history (...)
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  41. Andrew Halpin, Or, Even, What the Law Can Teach the Philosophy of Language: a Response to Green's Dworkin's Fallacy.score: 123.0
    This essay is a response to the important central theme of Michael Green's recent article, Dworkin's Fallacy, or What the Philosophy of Language Can't Teach (...)
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  42. Peter Lundgreen (1990). Engineering Education in Europe and the U.S.A., 17501930: The Rise to Dominance of School Culture and the Engineering Professions. [REVIEW] Annals of Science 47 (1):33-75.score: 123.0
    Summary The rise to dominance of school culture in engineering education took place much later in England and the U.S.A. than in France or Germany. Why (...)? This comparative essay argues that explanations are to be sought within the context of bureaucracy rather than in that of industrialization. The academic training of state engineers set a powerful role model in Continental Europe but was absent in Anglo-America. Consequently, the academic training of engineers for the private sector of the economy started earlier in Continental Europe, and the professional strategies of the engineers included emulating the public service. During the late nineteenth century a general belief in education as a key to international competition joined forces with a thorough transformation of the economy in providing new job markets for engineers graduating from colleges and universities. (shrink)
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  43. Charles Morton (1995). Aristotelian and Cartesian Logic at Harvard: Charles Morton's a Logick System & William Brattle's Compendium of Logick. Published by the Colonial Society of Massachusetts and Distributed by the University Press of Virginia.score: 123.0
    Machine generated contents note: ARISTOTELIAN AND CARTESIAN LOGIC AT HARVARD -- by Rick Kennedy -- I. Introduction --II. Religiously-Oriented, Dogmatically-Inclined Humanistic Logics from the Renaissance to the (...)
     
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  44. Michael Walzer (2007). Mill's "a Few Words on Non-Intervention" : a Commentary. In Nadia Urbinati & Alex Zakaras (eds.), J.S. Mill's Political Thought: A Bicentennial Reassessment. Cambridge University Press.score: 123.0
     
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  45. Graham Cairns-Smith, Thomas W. Clark, Ravi Gomatam, Robert H. Kane, Nicholas Maxwell, J. J. C. Smart, Sean A. Spence & Henry P. Stapp (2005). Commentaries on David Hodgson's "a Plain Person's Free Will". Journal of Consciousness Studies 12 (1):20-75.score: 120.0
    REMARKS ON EVOLUTION AND TIME-SCALES, Graham Cairns-Smith; HODGSON'S BLACK BOX, Thomas Clark; DO HODGSON'S PROPOSITIONS UNIQUELY CHARACTERIZE FREE WILL?, Ravi Gomatam; WHAT SHOULD WE (...)RETAIN FROM A PLAIN PERSON'S CONCEPT OF FREE WILL?, Gilberto Gomes; ISOLATING DISPARATE CHALLENGES TO HODGSON'S ACCOUNT OF FREE WILL, Liberty Jaswal; FREE AGENCY AND LAWS OF NATURE, Robert Kane; SCIENCE VERSUS REALIZATION OF VALUE, NOT DETERMINISM VERSUS CHOICE, Nicholas Maxwell; COMMENTS ON HODGSON, J.J.C. Smart; THE VIEW FROM WITHIN, Sean Spence; COMMENTARY ON HODGSON, Henry Stapp. (shrink)
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  46. Noam Chomsky, In Leon A. Jakobovits & Murray S. Miron (1959). A Review of BF Skinner's Verbal Behavior. [REVIEW] Language 35 (1):26--58.score: 120.0
    I had intended this review not specifically as a criticism of Skinner's speculations regarding language, but rather as a more general critique of behaviorist (I would (...)now prefer to say "empiricist") speculation as to the nature of higher mental processes. My reason for discussing Skinner's book in such detail was that it was the most careful and thoroughgoing presentation of such speculations, an evaluation that I feel is still accurate. Therefore, if the conclusions I attempted to substantiate in the review are correct, as I believe they are, then Skinner's work can be regarded as, in effect, a reductio ad absurdum of behaviorist assumptions. My personal view is that it is a definite merit, not a defect, of Skinner's work that it can be used for this purpose, and it was for this reason that I tried to deal with it fairly exhaustively. I do not see how his proposals can be improved upon, aside from occasional details and oversights, within the framework of the general assumptions that he accepts. I do not, in other words, see any way in which his proposals can be substantially improved within the general framework of behaviorist or neobehaviorist, or, more generally, empiricist ideas that has dominated much of modern linguistics, psychology, and philosophy. The conclusion that I hoped to establish in the review, by discussing these speculations in their most explicit and detailed form, was that the general point of view was largely mythology, and that its widespread acceptance is not the result of empirical support, persuasive reasoning, or the absence of a plausible alternative. (shrink)
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  47. S. Dam, T. A. Abma, M. J. M. Kardol & G. A. M. Widdershoven (2012). Here's My Dilemma”. Moral Case Deliberation as a Platform for Discussing Everyday Ethics in Elderly Care. Health Care Analysis 20 (3):250-267.score: 120.0
    Our study presents an overview of the issues that were brought forward by participants of a moral case deliberation (MCD) project in two elderly care organizations. The (...)
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  48. Elisa A. Hurley (2010). Pharmacotherapy to Blunt Memories of Sexual Violence: What's a Feminist to Think? Hypatia 25 (3):527 - 552.score: 120.0
    it has recently been discovered that propranolola beta-blocker traditionally used to treat cardiac arrhythmias and hypertensionmight disrupt the formation of the emotionally disturbing memories (...) that typically occur in the wake of traumatic events and consequently prevent the onset of trauma-induced psychological injuries such as Posttraumatic Stress Disorder. One context in which the use of propranolol is generating interest in both the popufor and scientific press is sexual violence. Nevertheless, feminists have so far not weighed in on propranolol. I suggest that the time is ripe for a careful feminist analysis of the moral and political implications of propranolol use in the context of sexual violence. In this paper, I map the feminist issues potentially raised by providing propranolol to victims of sexual assault, focusing in particufor on the compatibility of propranolol use and avaüability with an understanding of the social and systematic dimensions of rape s harms. I do not deliver a final verdict on propranolol; in fact, I show that we do not yet have enough information about propranolol's effects to do so. Rather, 1 provide a feminist framework for evaluating the possibilities and penis opened up by therapeutic memory manipuktion in the context of sexual violence against women. (shrink)
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  49. A. C. Paseau (2013). The Overgeneration Argument(s): A Succinct Refutation. Analysis 74 (1):ant097.score: 120.0
    The overgeneration argument attempts to show that accepting second-order validity as a sound formal counterpart of logical truth has the unacceptable consequence that the Continuum Hypothesis (...)is either a logical truth or a logical falsehood. The argument was presented and vigorously defended in John Etchemendys The Concept of Logical Consequence and it has many proponents to this day. Yet it is nothing but a seductive fallacy. I demonstrate this by considering five versions of the argument; as I show, each is either unsound or lacks a troubling conclusion. (shrink)
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  50. A. C. Paseau (2014). The Overgeneration Argument(s): A Succinct Refutation. Analysis 74 (1):40-47.score: 120.0
    The overgeneration argument attempts to show that accepting second-order validity as a sound formal counterpart of logical truth has the unacceptable consequence that the Continuum Hypothesis (...)is either a logical truth or a logical falsehood. The argument was presented and vigorously defended in John Etchemendys The Concept of Logical Consequence and it has many proponents to this day. Yet it is nothing but a seductive fallacy. I demonstrate this by considering five versions of the argument; as I show, each is either unsound or lacks a troubling conclusion. (shrink)
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