Search results for 'S. Boehm' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Miren Boehm (2013). Certainty, Necessity, and Knowledge in Hume's Treatise. In Stanley Tweyman (ed.), David Hume, A Tercentenary Tribute [the version in PhilPapers is the accurate, final version of the paper].score: 300.0
    Hume appeals to different kinds of certainties and necessities in the Treatise. He contrasts the certainty that arises from intuition and demonstrative reasoning with the certainty that arises from causal reasoning. He denies that the causal maxim is absolutely or metaphysically necessary, but he nonetheless takes the causal maxim and ‘proofs’ to be necessary. The focus of this paper is the certainty and necessity involved in Hume’s concept of knowledge. I defend the view that intuitive certainty, in particular, is certainty (...)
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  2. Rudolf Boehm (1965). Basic Reflections on Husserl's Phenomenological Reduction. International Philosophical Quarterly 5 (2):183-202.score: 300.0
    The article traces out the history of the evolution in meaning of the phenomenological reduction in husserl's writings. The starting point is husserl's conviction that what is lacking most to philosophy as well as to science is a truly rigorous scientific method. Already in the "logical investigations" (1901) the phenomenological reduction is presented as the core of this method. But here this reduction is understood as a deliberate restriction or limitation of the mind to what is adequately perceived in an (...)
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  3. Omri Boehm (2012). Kant's Regulative Spinozism. Kant-Studien 103 (3):292-317.score: 300.0
    The question of Kant's relation to Spinozist thought has been virtually ignored over the years. I analyze Kant's pre-critical 'possibility-proof' of God's existence, elaborated in the Beweisgrund, as well as the echoes that this proof has in the first Critique, in beginning to uncover the connection between Kant's thought and Spinoza's. Kant's espousal of the Principle of Sufficient Reason [PSR] for the analysis of modality during the pre-critical period committed him, I argue, to Spinozist substance monism. Much textual evidence suggests (...)
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  4. Miren Boehm (2013). Hume's Foundational Project in the Treatise. European Journal of Philosophy 22 (2).score: 300.0
    In the Introduction to the Treatise Hume very enthusiastically announces his project to provide a secure and solid foundation for the sciences by grounding them on his science of man. And Hume indicates in the Abstract that he carries out this project in the Treatise. But most interpreters do not believe that Hume's project comes to fruition. In this paper, I offer a general reading of what I call Hume's ‘foundational project’ in the Treatise, but I focus especially on Book (...)
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  5. Miren Boehm (2013). The Concept of Body in Hume's Treatise. Protosociology:206-220.score: 300.0
    Hume’s views concerning the existence of body or external objects are notoriously difficult and intractable. The paper sheds light on the concept of body in Hume’s Treatise by defending three theses. First, that Hume’s fundamental tenet that the only objects that are present to the mind are perceptions must be understood as methodological, rather than metaphysical or epistemological. Second, that Hume considers legitimate the fundamental assumption of natural philosophy that through experience and observation we know body. Third, that many of (...)
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  6. Miren Boehm (2012). Filling the Gaps in Hume's Vacuums. Hume Studies 38 (1):79-99.score: 300.0
    The paper addresses two difficulties that arise in Treatise 1.2.5. First, Hume appears to be inconsistent when he denies that we have an idea of a vacuum or empty space yet allows for the idea of an “invisible and intangible distance.” My solution to this difficulty is to develop the overlooked possibility that Hume does not take the invisible and intangible distance to be a distance at all. Second, although Hume denies that we have an idea of a vacuum, some (...)
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  7. Stephan Boehm (2002). The Ramifications of John Searle's Social Philosophy in Economics. Journal of Economic Methodology 9 (1):1-10.score: 300.0
    John Searle is well known for his contributions to the philosophy of language and to the philosophy of mind. In recent years he has extended his investigation to focus on the nature of social reality. In particular, he is intrigued by the creation of institutional facts, such as money, marriages and football matches. He postulates three primitive notions - 'collective intentionality', 'the assignment of function' and 'constitutive rules' - that are needed for the construction of institutional reality. The papers and (...)
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  8. Miren Boehm (forthcoming). Hume's Definitions of 'Cause': Without Idealizations, Within the Bounds of Science. Synthese:1-17.score: 300.0
    Interpreters have found it exceedingly difficult to understand how Hume could be right in claiming that his two definitions of ‘cause’ are essentially the same. As J. A. Robinson points out, the definitions do not even seem to be extensionally equivalent. Don Garrett offers an influential solution to this interpretative problem, one that attributes to Hume the reliance on an ideal observer. I argue that the theoretical need for an ideal observer stems from an idealized concept of definition, which many (...)
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  9. Gottfried Boehm (2013). Genesis: Paul Klee's Temporalization of Form. Research in Phenomenology 43 (3):311-330.score: 240.0
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  10. K. A. Paller, J. L. Voss & S. G. Boehm (2007). Validating Neural Correlates of Familiarity. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 11 (6):243-250.score: 240.0
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  11. Irene Berti, Marta García Morcillo, Isabelle Boehm, Pascal Luccioni, Glen W. Bowersock & Claude Calame (2009). Aldrete, Gregory S. Daily Life in the Roman City: Rome, Pompeii, and Ostia. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 2008. Xv+ 278 Pp. Numerous Black-and-White Figs. Paper, $19.95. Barker, Elton TE Entering the Agon: Dissent and Authority in Homer, His-Toriography and Tragedy. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009. Xiii+ 433 Pp. [REVIEW] American Journal of Philology 130:475-480.score: 240.0
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  12. S. Boehm, E. KlostErmann, W. Sommer & K. Paller (2006). Dissociating Perceptual and Representation-Based Contributions to Priming of Face Recognition☆. Consciousness and Cognition 15 (1):163-174.score: 240.0
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  13. Richard H. Baxter, William S. Blair, Ab Blankenship, Francis G. Boehm, Joseph E. Bradley, Rf Creighton, Cornelius Dubois, Jay Eliasberg, George S. Fabian & Robert Garsen (1965). Julius Barnathan. In Karl W. Linsenmann (ed.), Proceedings. St. Louis, Lutheran Academy for Scholarship.score: 240.0
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  14. B. Biesecker, K. Boehm, B. Wilfond & H. Gooding (2002). Child's Right to an Open Future-Reply. Hastings Center Report 32 (5):6-6.score: 240.0
     
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  15. Gottfried Boehm (2005). Open Horizons. About the History of Nature's Representation in Art. Rivista di Estetica 45 (29):139-146.score: 240.0
     
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  16. Lisa Krissoff Boehm, Michael Brooks, Patrick W. Carlton, Fran Chadwick, Margaret Smith Crocco, Jennifer Braithwait Darrow, Toby Daspit, Joseph DeFilippo, Susan Douglass, David King Dunaway, Sandy Eades, The Foxfire Fund, Amy S. Green, Ronald J. Grele, M. Gail Hickey, Cliff Kuhn, Erin McCarthy, Marjorie L. McLellan, Susan Moon, Charles Morrissey, John A. Neuenschwander, Rich Nixon, Irma M. Olmedo, Sandy Polishuk, Alessandro Portelli, Kimberly K. Porter, Troy Reeves, Donald A. Ritchie, Marie Scatena, David Sidwell, Ronald Simon, Alan Stein, Debra Sutphen, Kathryn Walbert, Glenn Whitman, John D. Willard & Linda P. Wood (2006). Preparing the Next Generation of Oral Historians: An Anthology of Oral History Education. Altamira Press.score: 240.0
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  17. Dimiter Georgiev Saschew, Ivan Chvatik, Mark Wildschut, John Macquarrie, Joan Stambaugh, Reijo Kupiainen, Rudolf Boehm, Francois Vezin, Johann Tzavaras & Mihaly Vajda (2005). Translating Heidegger's Sein und Zeit. Studia Phaenomenologica 5:35-273.score: 240.0
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  18. Omri Boehm (2011). The First Antinomy and Spinoza. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 19 (4):683 - 710.score: 120.0
    Scholars commonly assume that Kant never seriously engaged with Spinoza or Spinozism. However, in his later writings Kant argues several times that Spinozism is the most consistent form of transcendental realism. In the first part of the paper, I argue that the first Antinomy, debating the age and size of the world, already reflects Kant's confrontation with Spinozist metaphysics. Specifically, the position articulated in the Antithesis ? according to which the world is infinite and uncreated ? is Spinozist, not Leibnizian, (...)
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  19. Rudolf Boehm (2005). L'être et le temps d'une traduction. Studia Phaenomenologica 5:101-104.score: 120.0
    In this article, the author explains the context and circumstances in which he begun, back in the 60s, the first French translation of Sein und Zeit, in collaboration with Alphonse de Waehlens. The article describes the methods and perspectives the first French translators adopted during their work of translation. The article ends with a few considerations concerning the incompleteness of the Heideggerian’s project of Sein und Zeit, explaining this nonachievement by Heidegger’s abandonment of the existential perspective he assumed in Sein (...)
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  20. Stephan Boehm & Karl Farmer (1993). Why the Acrimony? Reply to Davidson. Critical Review 7 (2-3):407-421.score: 120.0
    Our response to Davidson is two?pronged. First, we dispute the basis for his dismissal of Austrian economics as presented by O'Driscoll and Rizzo. In particular, we reject his claim, dictated entirely by his Post Keynesian perspective, concerning an ?identical axiomatic foundation? of Austrian and neoclassical economics. Second, we seek to show that Davidson's criticism of neoclassicism (and by implication of Austrianism) is based on a superficial, incorrect, and outmoded reading of neoclassical economics.
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  21. Christopher Boehm (2010/2012). Moral Origins: The Evolution of Virtue, Altruism, and Shame. Basic Books.score: 120.0
    Darwin's inner voice -- Living the virtuous life -- Of altruism and free riders -- Knowing our immediate predecessors -- Resurrecting some venerable ancestors -- A natural Garden of Eden -- The positive side of social selection -- Learning morals across the generations -- Work of the moral majority -- Pleistocene ups, downs, and crashes -- Testing the selection-by-reputation hypothesis -- The evolution of morals -- Epilogue: humanity's moral future.
     
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  22. As Morality & Adaptive Problem-Solving (2000). Commentary Discussion of Christopher Boehm's Paper. In Leonard Katz (ed.), Evolutionary Origins of Morality: Cross Disciplinary Perspectives. Imprint Academic. 103-48.score: 72.0
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  23. John Brough (1972). The Emergence of an Absolute Consciousness in Husserl's Early Writings on Time-Consciousness. Man and World 5 (3):298-326.score: 42.0
    The collection of Edmund Husserl's sketches on time-consciousness from the years 1893-1917, edited by Rudolf Boehm and published as Volume X in the Husserliana series, affords significant new material for the study of the evolution of Husserl's thought. Specifically, the sketches suggest that in the course of analyzing the consciousness of temporal objects Husserl became convinced that a distinction must be drawn between an ultimate or absolute flow of consciousness and the immanent temporal objects or contents -- sense-data, appearances (...)
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  24. Robert C. Scharff (2013). “Who” is a “Topical Measuring” Postphenomenologist and How Does One Get That Way? Foundations of Science 18 (2):343-350.score: 36.0
    Gert Goeminne’s paper is primarily concerned with “the politics of sustainable technology,” but for good reasons he does not start with this topic. He knows that technology studies as he conceives it must clear a space for itself in a philosophical atmosphere that discourages its pursuit. He therefore begins with a critique of this objectivistic and technocratically defined atmosphere, before moving on to embrace a postphenomenology of technological multistabilities, and then further to introduce what he calls (in an adaptation of (...)
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  25. Felicia E. Kruse (2010). Peirce, God, and the "Transcendentalist Virus". Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 46 (3):386-400.score: 30.0
    At the beginning of "The Law of Mind," Charles S. Peirce makes this striking admission (W8:135):I may mention, for the benefit of those who are curious in studying mental biographies, that I was born and reared in the neighborhood of Concord—I mean in Cambridge—at the time when Emerson, Hedge, and their friends were disseminating the ideas that they had caught from Schelling, and Schelling from Plotinus, from Boehm, or from God knows what minds struck with the monstrous mysticism of (...)
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  26. David Walsh (1984). The Historical Dialectic of Spirit: Jacob Boehme's Influence on Hegel. In Robert L. Perkins (ed.), History and System: Hegel's Philosophy of History. State University of New York Press. 15--35.score: 26.0
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  27. Celia Deane-Drummond (2009). Are Animals Moral? A Theological Appraisal of the Evolution of Vice and Virtue. Zygon 44 (4):932-950.score: 24.0
    I discuss controversial claims about the status of non-human animals as moral beings in relation to philosophical claims to the contrary. I address questions about the ontology of animals rather than ethical approaches as to how humans need to treat other animals through notions of, for example, animal rights. I explore the evolutionary origins of behavior that can be considered vices or virtues and suggest that Thomas Aquinas is closer to Darwin's view on nonhuman animals than we might suppose. An (...)
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  28. Alfredo Ferrarin (1994). Husserl on the Ego and its Eidos (. Journal of the History of Philosophy 32 (4):645-659.score: 24.0
    Husserl on the Ego and its Eidos (Cartesian Meditations, IV) ALFREDO FERRARIN THE THEORY OF the intentionality of consciousness is essential for Husserl's philosophy, and in particular for his mature theory of the ego. But it runs into serious difficulties when it has to account for consciousness's transcendental constitution of its own reflective experience and its relation to immanent time. This intricate knot, the inseparability of time and constitution, is most visibly displayed in Husserl's writings from the 192os up to (...)
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  29. Eckart Förster & Yitzhak Y. Melamed (eds.) (2012). Spinoza and German Idealism. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    Machine generated contents note: 1. Rationality, idealism, monism, and beyond Michael Della Rocca; 2. Kant's idea of the unconditioned and Spinoza's the fourth antinomy and the ideal of pure reason Omri Boehm; 3. The question is whether a purely apparent person is possible Karl Ameriks; 4. Herder and Spinoza Michael Forster; 5. Goethe's Spinozism Eckart Förster; 6. Fichte on freedom: the Spinozistic background Allen Wood; 7. Fichte on the consciousness of Spinoza's God Johannes Haag; 8. Spinoza in Schelling's early (...)
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  30. Gert Goeminne (2013). Who is Afraid of the Political? A Response to Robert Scharff and Michel Puech. Foundations of Science 18 (2):355-360.score: 24.0
    In their respective commentaries to my article “Postphenomenology and the Politics of Sustainable Technology” both Robert Scharff and Michel Puech take issue with my postphenomenological inroad into the politics of technology. In a first step I try to accommodate the suggestions and objections raised by Scharff by making my account of the political more explicit. Consequently, I argue how an antagonistic relational conceptualisation of the political allows me to address head on Puech’s plea to leave politics behind and move towards (...)
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  31. Paul Davidson (1993). Austrians and Post Keynesians on Economic Reality: Rejoinder to Critics. Critical Review 7 (2-3):423-444.score: 24.0
    Most economists?old and new classical, old and new Keynesian, and Austrian (as embodied in O'Driscoll and Rizzo's The Economics of Time and Ignorance) postulate an immutable reality unchangeable by any human action (the ergodic hypothesis). They differ only over the amount of information decisionmakers have, in the short run, about this unchanging reality. Keynes and the Post Keynesians provide an axiomatic alternative model that presumes a transmutable economic reality (i.e., it postulates a nonergodic environment). Runde, Torr, Prychitko, and (...) and Farmer fail to adequately address this dichotomous analysis of reality in responding to my review of O'Driscoll and Rizzo's book. (shrink)
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  32. Max Imdahl (2012). Iconica. L'intuizione delle immagini. Aisthesis. Pratiche, Linguaggi E Saperi Dell’Estetico 5 (2).score: 24.0
    Posthumously published by Gottfried Boehm, Iconic may well be considered as a concise summa of Max Imdahl’s theories and methods. Referring to Panofsky and to his idea of an art-historical understanding on three levels («pre-iconographic», «iconographic» and «iconological»), Imdahl highlights the limits of such interpretation, suggesting the necessity of overcoming it and outlining a fourth level which he calls «iconic». Basing on this approach, it becomes possible to look at images as self-referential systems, as autonomous domains endowed with a (...)
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  33. A. S. F. Gow (1938). Hans Schweizer: Aberglaube und Zauberei bet Tkeokrit. Pp. 56. Basel: Boehm, 1937. Paper. The Classical Review 52 (04):144-.score: 24.0
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  34. Leonard Katz (ed.) (2000). Evolutionary Origins of Morality: Cross Disciplinary Perspectives. Imprint Academic.score: 24.0
    Four principal papers and a total of 43 peer commentaries on the evolutionary origins of morality. To what extent is human morality the outcome of a continuous development from motives, emotions and social behaviour found in nonhuman animals? Jerome Kagan, Hans Kummer, Peter Railton and others discuss the first principal paper by primatologists Jessica Flack and Frans de Waal. The second paper, by cultural anthropologist Christopher Boehm, synthesizes social science and biological evidence to support his theory of how our (...)
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  35. Bente Larsen (2014). Eye, Matter and Interpretation. Nordic Journal of Aesthetics 23 (46).score: 24.0
    The main thesis behind the article is that Ad Reinhardt in hisPaintings , through a ‘painting away’ of what traditionally constitutes painting, color, pictorial space and gesture, leads our attention towards visuality. The thesis shall be pursued through a discussion of two different approaches to visual sensing as aesthetic experience, one that prefaces a hermeneutical/phenomenological approach claiming sensuousness to unfold through the gesture of chiasm and ‘intertwining’, as it is formulated by Gottfried Boehm, and another, through Jean-Luc Nancy’s post-phenomenological (...)
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  36. Robert H. Paslick (1985). The Ontological Context of Gadamer's “Fusion”: Boehme, Heidegger, and Non-Duality. [REVIEW] Man and World 18 (4):405-422.score: 24.0
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  37. Mindy Steinberg & Thomas S. Weisner (2012). Everyday Ruptures: Children, Youth, and Migration in Global Perspective. Cati Coe, Rachel R. Reynolds, Deborah A. Boehm, Julia Meredith Hess, and Heather Rae‐Espinoza, Eds. Nashville: Vanderbilt. 2011. Vii + 230pp. [REVIEW] Ethos 40 (4):1-3.score: 24.0
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  38. R. O. Elveton (1970). The Phenomenology of Husserl. Chicago,Quadrangle Books.score: 24.0
    The philosophy of Edmund Husserl, by O. Becker.--The phenomenological philosophy of Edmund Husserl and contemporary criticism, by E. Fink.--The decisive phases in the development of Husserl's philosophy, by W. Biemel.--Husserl's concept of the "absolute," by R. Boehm.--Critical observations concerning Husserl's posthumous writings, by H. Wagner.--Husserl's departure from Cartesianism, by L. Landgrebe.
     
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  39. G. B. Kerferd (1961). Plato's Early Dialogues Robert Böehme: Von Sokrates zur Ideenlehre. Beobachtungen zur Chronologie des platonischen Frühwerks. (Dissertationes Bernenses, Ser. i, fasc. 9.) Pp. 159. Bern: Francke, 1959. Stiff paper, 18.50 Sw.fr. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 11 (01):32-33.score: 24.0
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  40. S. J. McGrath (2006). Boehme, Hegel, Schelling, and the Hermetic Theology of Evil. Philosophy and Theology 18 (2):257-286.score: 16.0
    Building on recent research exposing Hegel’s debt to esoteric Christianity (both Gnostic and Hermetic traditions), the aim of this paper is to show how Hegel and Schelling resolve an ambiguity in Boehme’s theology of evil in opposing ways. Jacob Boehme’s notion of the individuation of God through the overcoming ofopposition is the central paradigm for both Hegel’s and Schelling’s understanding of the role of evil in the life of God. Boehme remains ambiguous on the question of the modality of evil: (...)
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  41. Daniel J. Peterson (2006). Jacob Boehme and Paul Tillich: A Reassessment of the Mystical Philosopher and Systematic Theologian. Religious Studies 42 (2):225-234.score: 14.0
    Jacob Boehme, the seventeenth-century mystical philosopher, had a significant influence upon Paul Tillich. In this article I offer a reassessment of the relationship between these two thinkers by arguing for an orthodox interpretation of Boehme's doctrine of God that links him more closely with Tillich than recent commentators have suggested. Specifically, I show how Boehme and Tillich stand united against the heterodox Hegel in their presentation of a dynamic process of divinity's self-differentiation and reconciliation that completes itself apart from history (...)
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  42. Miklos Vetö (forthcoming). Jacob Boehme et l'idéalisme postkantien. Les Études Philosophiques.score: 14.0
    Boehme a été lu avec enthousiasme par les Romantiques et les Idéalistes allemands et sa mystique spéculative a marqué le développement de la pensée postkantienne. L'article explore l'influence de Boehme sur Hegel et Schelling à travers les grands thèmes de la révélation-manifestation, du devenir et du temps, du mal. Il a également l'ambition de mettre en lumière la pertinence philosophique sui generis de la problématique boehmienne. Jacob Boehme's speculative mysticism was studied intensely by the Romantics and the German Idealists and (...)
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  43. Emmanuel Tourpe (2013). Potentia Dei, fecunditas entis : À la recherche des fondements métaphysiques d’une ontologie de la fécondité après Thomas d’Aquin. Laval Thã©Ologique Et Philosophique 69 (2):281-293.score: 14.0
    Emmanuel Tourpe | Résumé : La voie traditionnelle de l’analogie de l’être s’accomplit en contexte post-heideggérien dans une analogie de la fécondité. Mais cette analogie de la fécondité a pour fondement une ontologie de la fécondité, qui suppose une reprise du questionnement thomiste sur la puissance de Dieu à la lumière des développements de Boehme et de l’idéalisme allemand. C’est en découvrant la positivité essentielle de la puissance féconde de Dieu que la métaphysique contemporaine peut se renouveler de manière décisive. (...)
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  44. Aleksandra Ziółkowska-Boehm (2006). Kaja, a Stretscher-Barear From the Warsaw Uprising, Saviour of the Hubal Cross. Dialogue and Universalism 16 (7-9):157-174.score: 12.0
    This paper is a fragment of the book “Kaja od Radosława, czyli historia Hubalowego Krzyża”, which was published by Warszawskie Wydawnictwo Literackie Muza in 2006. It will be published by the American publisher The Military History Press under the title “Kaia Savior of the Hubal Cross”. Covering a century of Polish history, it is full of tragic and compelling events. Such historic events as Polish life in Siberia, Warsaw before the war, the German occupation, the Warsaw Uprising, life in Ostaszków, (...)
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  45. Michel Henry (2009). Destruction ontologique de la critique kantienne du paralogisme de la psychologie rationnelle. Studia Phaenomenologica 9:17-53.score: 8.0
    This previously unpublished text of Michel Henry’s was written during the preparation of his first major work published in 1963: The Essence of Manifestation. Being devoted to the philosophy of Immanuel Kant, this extensive text could be as well integrated in the above mentioned book, namely in the context where the author criticizes the ontological monism privileged by the strong tradition of German philosophy, from Jacob Boehme and Kant to Heidegger. Starting from the topic of self-knowledge, this text focuses on (...)
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  46. E. S. Water House (1932). The Mystic Will. Based on a Study of the Philosophy of Jacob Boehme. By Howard H. Brinton, Ph.D. With an Introduction by Rufus M. Jones, M.A., D.Litt. (London: George Allen and Unwin Ltd. 1931. Pp. Xiii + 269. Price 8s. 6d. Net.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 7 (25):114-.score: 8.0
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  47. Rainer Rochlitz (1986). Briefe: 1903–1975. Telos 1986 (69):196-200.score: 8.0
    Bloch's correspondence, published the year of his hundredth birthday, evokes a period of German philosophy which today seems forever gone. In exile in Switzerland at the outbreak of WWI, Czechoslovakia and the United States during die Nazi period and in bodi Germanies after 1945, Bloch epitomized an extraordinary symbiosis of the Jewish and the German spirits. Benjamin, Adorno, and Bloch were assimilated Jews unaware of their identity (or difference) except dirough the disdainful look of others. They saw themselves primarily within (...)
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  48. Ernest Benjamin Koenker (1971). Great Dialecticians in Modern Christian Thought. Minneapolis, Minn.,Augsburg Pub. House.score: 8.0
    Ancient and medieval dialecticians: the lengthening shadow of Plato.--Traveller on the royal way: Martin Luther on simul justus et peccator.--Musician in the concert of God's joy: Jacob Boehme on ground and unground.--Prodigy between finite and infinite: Pascal's dialectic of grandeur and misery.--Thinker of the thoughts of God: Hegel and the dialectic of movement.--Venturer at the brinks: Kierkegaard and the dialectic of the suffering self.--Walker on the narrow ridge: Karl Barth and the dialectic of the human and divine.--Bridge-builder beyond the boundaries: (...)
     
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