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Silvia Camporesi [10]S. Camporesi [5]
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Profile: Silvia Camporesi (European School of Molecular Medicine & University of Milano)
Profile: Silvia Camporesi (King's College London)
  1. Silvia Camporesi (forthcoming). The Ethics of the New Eugenics. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-4.
    The Ethics of the New Eugenics, edited by Calum MacKellar and Christopher Bechtel ,An introductory “Note on the Text” states: “The research on which this book is based was commissioned by the Scottish Council on Human Bioethics. It is the result of the collective work of many individuals at the Scottish Council on Human Bioethics. Initial drafting and subsequent editing was the work of Calum MacKellar and Christopher Bechtel, as agreed to by the Ethics Committee of the Scottish Council on (...)
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  2. Silvia Camporesi (2014). Simona Giordano, Exercise and Eating Disorders: An Ethical and Legal Analysis. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 8 (2):216-220.
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  3. Silvia Camporesi & Michael J. McNamee (2014). Performance Enhancement, Elite Athletes and Anti Doping Governance: Comparing Human Guinea Pigs in Pharmaceutical Research and Professional Sports. Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 9 (1):4.
    In light of the World Anti Doping Agency’s 2013 Code Revision process, we critically explore the applicability of two of three criteria used to determine whether a method or substance should be considered for their Prohibited List, namely its (potential) performance enhancing effects and its (potential) risk to the health of the athlete. To do so, we compare two communities of human guinea pigs: (i) individuals who make a living out of serial participation in Phase 1 pharmacology trials; and (ii) (...)
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  4. Silvia Camporesi (2013). Bend It Like Beckham! The Ethics of Genetically Testing Children for Athletic Potential. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 7 (2):175-185.
    The recent boom of direct-to-consumer (DTC) genetic tests, aimed at measuring children?s athletic potential, is the latest wave in the ?pre-professionalization? of children that has characterized, especially but not exclusively, the USA in the last 15 years or so. In this paper, I analyse the use of DTC genetic tests, sometimes coupled with more traditional methods of ?talent scouting?, to assess a child?s predisposition to athletic performance. I first discuss the scientific evidence at the basis of these tests, and the (...)
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  5. Silvia Camporesi & Matteo Mameli (2012). The Context of Clinical Research and Its Ethical Relevance: The COMPAS Trial as a Case Study. American Journal of Bioethics 12 (1):39 - 40.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 12, Issue 1, Page 39-40, January 2012.
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  6. Katrina Karkazis, Rebecca Jordan-Young, Georgiann Davis & Silvia Camporesi (2012). Out of Bounds? A Critique of the New Policies on Hyperandrogenism in Elite Female Athletes. American Journal of Bioethics 12 (7):3-16.
    In May 2011, more than a decade after the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) and the International Olympic Committee (IOC) abandoned sex testing, they devised new policies in response to the IAAF's treatment of Caster Semenya, the South African runner whose sex was challenged because of her spectacular win and powerful physique that fueled an international frenzy questioning her sex and legitimacy to compete as female. These policies claim that atypically high levels of endogenous testosterone in women (caused by (...)
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  7. Silvia Camporesi (2011). Can We Finally See Pain?: Brain Imaging Techniques and Implications for the Law. Journal of Consciousness Studies 18 (9-10):9-10.
    The assessment of chronic pain is a highly unmet medical need. Chronic pain is also the subject of a large and costly category of legal claims. Yet, with pain cases, the jury always face a doubt: is the claimant faking or malingering? How can we be assured that the claimant is 'really' in pain? Most recently, several new neuroimaging technologies are promising to solve these questions, by rendering pain visible, measurable and, to some degree, verifiable. The results of these advancements (...)
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  8. Silvia Camporesi & Paolo Maugeri (2011). Genetic Enhancement in Sports: The Role of Reason and Private Rationalities in the Public Arena. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 20 (2):248-257.
    Reviews of philosophical books run the risk of being either excessively and unconstructively critical or superficially praiseworthy. To avoid both these risks, we test the approach outlined by Häyry in his book Rationality and the Genetic Challenge: Making People Better? by applying it to an eighth genetic challenge, namely, a variation of the genetic enhancement challenge discussed by Häyry as it applies to sports. We assess whether genetic enhancement in sports should be conceived as an eighth wonder or an eighth (...)
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  9. S. Camporesi & P. Maugeri (2010). Caster Semenya: Sport, Categories and the Creative Role of Ethics. Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (6):378-379.
    Caster Semenya, a South African 18-year-old, won the 800-metre track running title at the Berlin World Athletics Championships in 2009. Only 3 h later, her gender was being harshly contested. The investigation of the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) was neither discreet nor respectful of her privacy. Caster's case has implications for the ethics of sports and debates about gender and enhancement, and for the philosophical debate about the nature of categories and the classification of people. The IAAF has (...)
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  10. Silvia Camporesi (2009). Choosing Deafness with Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis: An Ethical Way to Carry on a Cultural Bloodline? Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 19 (01):86-.
    These words were written by ethicist Jonathan Glover in his paper “Future People, Disability and Screening” in 1992. Whereas screening and choosing for a disability remained a theoretical possibility 16 years ago, it has now become reality. In 2006, Susannah Baruch and colleagues at John Hopkins University published a survey of 190 American preimplantation genetic diagnosis clinics, and found that 3% reported having the intentional use of PGD “to select an embryo for the presence of a disability.” Even before, in (...)
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  11. S. Camporesi (2008). Oscar Pistorius, Enhancement and Post-Humans. Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (9):639-639.
    Oscar Pistorius was born without fibulas and had both legs amputated below the knee when he was 11 months old. A business student at the University of Pretoria, Pistorius runs with the aid of carbon-fibre artificial limbs and is the double amputee world record holder in the 100, 200 and 400 metres events.1“I don’t see myself as disabled,” says Oscar, “There’s nothing I can’t do that able-bodied athletes can do.”2 But then the question is: do prosthetic limbs simply level the (...)
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  12. S. Camporesi & G. Boniolo (2008). Fearing a Non-Existing Minotaur? The Ethical Challenges of Research on Cytoplasmic Hybrid Embryos. Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (11):821-825.
    In this paper we address the ethical challenges of research on cytoplasmic hybrid embryos, or “cybrids”. The controversial pronouncement of the UK’s Human Embryology and Fertilisation Authority of September 2007 on the permissibility of this area of research is the starting point of our discussion, and we argue in its favour. By a rigorous definition of the entities at issue, we show how the terms “chimera” and “hybrid” are improper in the case of cybrids, and how their use can bias (...)
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  13. S. Camporesi & L. Bortolotti (2008). Reproductive Cloning in Humans and Therapeutic Cloning in Primates: Is the Ethical Debate Catching Up with the Recent Scientific Advances? Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (9):e15-e15.
    After years of failure, in November 2007 primate embryonic stem cells were derived by somatic cellular nuclear transfer, also known as therapeutic cloning. The first embryo transfer for human reproductive cloning purposes was also attempted in 2006, albeit with negative results. These two events force us to think carefully about the possibility of human cloning which is now much closer to becoming a reality. In this paper we tackle this issue from two sides, first summarising what scientists have achieved so (...)
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